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  1.  (10085.1)
    I've been worried, lately. Not going to elaborate on the boring minutiae of my private life and its numerous neurotic hang-ups, but in a nutshell I feel as if I don't have time. When I'm busy, I'm constantly thinking of creative things to do - writing, drawing, etc. - but when I have the time, I feel robbed of my enthusiasm and energy. It doesn't help that I'm 21 and about to begin my third year at Uni.

    I want, NEED desperately to be making stuff and putting it on the 'net and elsewhere, but I'm robbed of the time. I want to be an illustrator or a director or a writer, or even some given degree of all three, but I keep running into dead-ends - catching myself killing time on the 'net.

    Creative people - in the past and at present, how do you keep a balance between work, social and creative lives? Should I just quit using the internet to save time, or allot a scheduled hour or so each day in which I do nothing but draw/write/etc.? Would it even be advisable to just put my creative endeavours on hold until my studies are finished? Any suggestions will be very much appreciated.
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      CommentAuthorYskaya
    • CommentTimeJul 30th 2011
     (10085.2)
    Ariana said it best: "What do I want to do today? Look at pretty pictures or make pretty pictures?" (quoting from memory, here)


    So my advice is:

    -to quit the internet lollygagging only e-mail, banking and emergencies among friends and family may divert your attention

    -Establish your necessary routine that you have to do before you can work (showering, coffee, answering e-mail only 3 times a day )

    -Plan your free time, plan your social contact moments.

    -If your creativity boosts your energy do it next to your study, creative thinking shows in your academics too.
    -If it is your health that lags your creative endeavors, take up sports and a healthy diet so you gain energy for your study and attempt arts as a side project or admit you'd rather watch a film and check the web as relax time after your studies, because the mind needs to unwind ;)

    Keeping a time diary for 3 days- 1 month to see what actually consumes your time helps when planning your creative schedule.

    This is what worked for me. I'm told I appreciate solitude more than the average person does hence I added the 'plan your social contact moments' advice

    Hope it helps a bit. It's an important question, I'm also curious to see what the other whitechapel denizens have done.
    •  
      CommentAuthorglukkake
    • CommentTimeJul 30th 2011
     (10085.3)
    So many times, when I could just take an hour or so to draw something, I feel like it's not enough time, or I'll be in the middle of something I'm doing. And so I'll say: "oh, I can just push it off until later". Then when all that stuff wraps up, I can't push myself to draw or I get self conscious of the idea or I'll be sleepy and then just resolve to refresh Twitter for the 5000th time that day.

    I've changed that to where I just fucking sit down and draw it right there.

    Most of the usual work-tasks I do, I can actually accomplish them in minutes. I always feel like it'll take a ton of time, but when I look at the clock, it's only been 5 minutes and I've completed that and several other tasks. So don't be afraid to push some things back just to indulge yourself in some art time. And really, drawing that thing out of your head or writing that bit down doesn't take too long. As you keep going, you'll get faster and better at it, especially knowing there's a time limit. Most of my sketches are not aesthetically pleasing because they're really just the equivalent of shorthand notes to me for when I have those 4 hours to bring it to life. And this is OK.

    And yea, turn off the internet for a while. I hide my bookmark toolbar when it's work time. I close the tabs so I'm not constantly peeping at the new update numbers steadily increase. Sometimes I'll fully log out so that if I catch myself trying to go to a page, I have to think about logging in before I can do "just a quick check on what's going on". Whatever you can do to make it more difficult for you to get your time wasters, the better.

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