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    •  
      CommentAuthordorkmuffin
    • CommentTimeOct 22nd 2011
     (10289.61)
    And...





    [headdesk]
    •  
      CommentAuthoroldhat
    • CommentTimeOct 22nd 2011
     (10289.62)
    Yeah, wow. That really spiralled, didn't it?
    •  
      CommentAuthordispophoto
    • CommentTimeOct 22nd 2011
     (10289.63)
    time to pull this out:
    retards
    • CommentAuthorRenThing
    • CommentTimeOct 22nd 2011 edited
     (10289.64)
    Still, look at the number of people saying "Whoa, settle down, settle down." as opposed to the usual "NO U SUK!" trolling that happens in other places.

    edit: nevermind what I said, that idiotic and pretty offensive pic had to get posted.
    •  
      CommentAuthoroldhat
    • CommentTimeOct 22nd 2011 edited
     (10289.65)
    I think maybe this is more appropriate?

    •  
      CommentAuthornelzbub
    • CommentTimeOct 22nd 2011
     (10289.66)
    @ oldhat- thanks, I will be borrowing that.
    •  
      CommentAuthordispophoto
    • CommentTimeOct 22nd 2011
     (10289.67)
    since i posted the "idiotic & pretty offensive pic" (but you have to admit the thread was on the verge of heading in that direction) i might as well put in my own view, instead of just doing a 'hit & run' pic.

    right now i'm 37, and i work as a video/photo freelancer in Montréal, mainly in the Deaf community. the video stuff involves primarily translating texts into ASL and/or LSQ for government contracts or organizations for their websites and/or DVDs to be sent out. I've only been here for a year and half, and people hire me over already established persons with similar skills (although one of them is a good friend of my fiancee, so we tend to refer each other & hire each other when needed) because of two reasons: the quality of my work in comparison to theirs is on par or *much* better; and i'm NOT an asshole. there have been MANY so-called photographers or video people here who end up becoming 'one-hit wonders' where people hire them, but don't hire them again after the contract is done, due to their professionalism, attitude (mainly attitudes) or the quality of their work (sometimes all 3). me, i have a very flexible approach with my clients, which is why i constantly get repeat business. attitude is the key here, especially if your focus is on community-based employment. if i'm an asshole with them, i'd be relegated to 'outsider' status very quickly, no matter how good my work is.
    • CommentAuthorOddcult
    • CommentTimeOct 22nd 2011
     (10289.68)
    mmm... sandwich...
    •  
      CommentAuthordorkmuffin
    • CommentTimeOct 22nd 2011
     (10289.69)
    Dickfinity FTW.
    •  
      CommentAuthorMorac
    • CommentTimeOct 22nd 2011
     (10289.70)
    ALL OF THE DICKS.
    •  
      CommentAuthortaphead
    • CommentTimeOct 22nd 2011
     (10289.71)
    GUYS THIS BLT IS THE BEST
  1.  (10289.72)
    @William George

    This guy is successful and I'm pretty sure he's not an asshole:

  2.  (10289.73)
    Up to a point, this thread was a fascinating read. Don't suppose anyone wants to continue talking about how the current financial situation has effected their life? Or the things they've done to work around the million different ways a harsh economy can introduce crushing failure? Because I'd be really interested in hearing about that.

    As I mentioned earlier, my personal method of dealing with the world is by keeping expenses low, working a job I don't mind (much) but will never love, and being careful enough with money that I can pursue the things that make me happy when not at work. I will never make a living with the little writing I do, but it makes my life better in ways that have nothing to do with money.
  3.  (10289.74)
    I dunno, I'm not completely unsuccessful anymore, and I kinda had to be a dick to get here.
    •  
      CommentAuthordorkmuffin
    • CommentTimeOct 22nd 2011
     (10289.75)
    I'd be down to continue the current discussion. I'll write a little summary of how this has changed shit for me tomorrow when I'm not.... drunk. Cuz I'm totally drunk.
    • CommentAuthorStefanJ
    • CommentTimeOct 22nd 2011 edited
     (10289.76)
    I'm doing pretty well financially mainly due to long service. I survived by being skilled and a good team member . . . and specifically not being a pain in the ass. I never pushed anyone under the bus. I'm not especially competitive. On the contrary: I'm flexible. I share knowledge.

    RE my writing, see James' last paragraph. My writing earns me a couple a hundred a year, but it means a hell of a lot.

    Um. For what it's worth, I run the school supply drive, food bank drive, and (until recently) the toy drive at work. I bring this up not to boast, but to point out something troubling. It's getting harder to get donations out of my co-workers. Some people are absolutely great; they drop off $100 checks for the food bank, stuff like that. But the great aggregate seems to be pretty crappy since the beginning of the recession. About ten years ago, we'd have VPs donating bicycles and huge checks; we'd fill up a pickup truck with toys. Now, "eh." The thing is, everyone at work is working. The whole Fear of Fear Itself thing seems very real.
  4.  (10289.77)
    You know, I take it back. I do better than survive; I pay my bills on time, I eat well, I pay my child support on time, and I try to spoil my girlfriend and my kid as well as I can. I eat well, and I have nice toys. I do fairly well, without owning a home or a car.

    I may have had to do some dickish things in the past to get here (some say working law enforcement is in itself a dick thing to do) but for the most part, I am not a dick. Though I have given up on any specific dreams I may have once had; I was never talented at things like art or music. I know I'll get a decent retirement somewhere between 50-57, and be young enough to enjoy it, with my family, and I guess that's good enough.
    •  
      CommentAuthornelzbub
    • CommentTimeOct 23rd 2011
     (10289.78)
    I'm finding this thread fascinating and would love to contribute with some of my own experiences of following my dreams and where it has taken me.
    Firstly, Please forgive the deliberate vagueness! I hope you'll understand.
    Secondly, please allow me to emphasise that the last thing I would do is recommend that anyone take this as advice to emulate my behaviour- however I think the sentiments behind my actions have some relevance.
    My formative years were in London and Glasgow during the height of the house/rave era, and due to some overwhelmingly positive and life changing experiences during that time, I dropped out of university and made a deliberate decision to take a different path, the details of which I cannot really share.
    What I can say is that I made my choices fully aware of their inherent risks and limitations and in twenty years I've never ripped anyone off or stitched anyone up, I have built a large network of friends and associates and despite ups and downs, I have managed my own business successfully without(I think) harming any others and having much fun along the way.
    I have never equated success with monetary wealth (which is handy because I've never really had much of that!)- more with being able to do the thing you love and the path I have chosen has led to me finally being able to do that. In the six years I have been in Amsterdam I have had the chance to be able to see my dreams as a reality. While I'll be the first to admit that reality can and does, regularly fail to live up to expectations I have to say that I am largely happy with the choices I made all those years ago and the life that has resulted from those choices.
    It was one of my earliest associates who gave me the motto of "nice things for nice people" and I've always tried to live up to that because it just felt right.
    It may not be the philosophy of the outrageously successful, but it works for me.
    •  
      CommentAuthoroddbill
    • CommentTimeOct 23rd 2011 edited
     (10289.79)
    Going way back to the original post, I honestly don't think the quality of future prospects facing the recently graduated is all that different than it was when I came out of college back in 1993.

    I was a theater student in Buffalo NY. I knew I was going to have to move, I knew I was going to be poor. I chose a state school over a more prestigious private school because it seemed the height of insanity to take on tens of thousands in debt for a theater degree, even then. I wanted to be serious about it, and figured it mattered more that I hone skill as opposed to buy connections. My career petered out a few years later but I still think I made the right decision there. I carried a couple of thousand dollars debt for about 10 years, and thought I'd never pay it off, but I finally did in 2003.

    When you are looking at a debt even as low as 2 to 5k that you see no ability to pay off ever, because you make less than 20k per year on a series of cobbled together temp jobs it all looks pretty bleak. But that does eventually get paid off, and you do eventually start earning, as long as you keep at it.

    I moved to LA to act, did some plays and some TV commercials (one that was even a pretty big payday), but eventually stopped doing that as the freelancer lifestyle was just not for me. The anxiety and frustration of constantly hustling for work was not something I was mentally composed to thrive in, as I discovered.

    So I started doing office temp work and working on my own artistic projects in my spare time. The temp work led to a series of completely unforeseeable opportunities that zig-zagged me into corporate IT and a well paying career (so far!) - in the meantime I did a bunch of personal projects and helped a bunch of friends with theirs.

    It hasn't been a bad life, though it didn't go the way I thought it would.

    The truth, though, is that almost nobody's life goes the way they think it will. It's not smart to get too hung up on doing the thing you were in love with when you were a teenager. The world is bigger and stranger and more kind than you've been told. Keep being interested in things, look out for yourself and the people who depend on you, pay your own way and then do what you like. Opportunities open up that you can't predict and if you can manage to have the freedom of movement that not being dependent can provide, you can pivot to them more easily. Find the fun in whatever you are doing right now.

    That's how I work it, at least. I have not done too badly. I don't think a recent college graduate needs to do anything more drastically different than that.

    This chart I found online is also probably a good guide:

    chart

    (PS: Career wise I'm probably somewhere in the bottom middle of the chart.)
    •  
      CommentAuthornelzbub
    • CommentTimeOct 23rd 2011
     (10289.80)
    That is a great pie chart, thank you!