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      CommentAuthorBeamish
    • CommentTimeMar 4th 2012
     (10478.1)
    #ChromiumAndOtherOSes

    @morac That's true but I have problems getting the new Ubuntu to recognize my nic.
  1.  (10478.2)
    I went with the easy option: got the houdehold sysop/Net God to install Ubuntu instead.
  2.  (10478.3)
    #PassoverSeder

    Okay, so I've been invited to a friend's place for Seder and I'm trying to figure out if there's something that I'm supposed to be bringing / not bringing or if there's anything that I really shouldn't be doing while I'm there (IE: riding around on a pig while eating fish).
    Is there someone on here that's good with religious things like this? I have a good grasp on the generalities, but I have no idea on the specifics, especially about the holidays.

    Thanks in advance.
  3.  (10478.4)
    #PassoverSeder

    I've never been invited to a Seder (kind of an honor, that), but as a kid I somehow ended up hanging with the Jews at my school and thus went to a few Conservative/Reform Bar Mitzvahs, so I have a little experience as a goy among the Chosen People. :) Even though the Seder involves a bit of ritual, part of the point of the rite is to pass it along to future generations, so it includes an explanation by the host of what they're doing as they do it. If they all know it's your first Seder, they'll be more than happy to just treat you like a 4-year-old who needs instruction about everything. Judaism has as much variability in observance as Christianity; some are very by-the-Book, others not so much. They may tell you that you don't need to do one thing or another. If so, don't insist on doing it; they may be politely indicating that they'd rather you didn't. Just be polite and respectful, don't say "God" (or "Jesus"), don't draw attention to yourself, etc. But really: ask your friend. He'll be able to explain what his family expects of you, and will be able to coach you on what's appropriate or not as a non-Jewish guest at the meal.

    P.S. I'm not aware of anything in the Tanakh against riding a pig while eating fish. Go for it. ;)
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      CommentAuthorBeamish
    • CommentTimeMar 6th 2012
     (10478.5)
    @passover/seder

    This may help.
  4.  (10478.6)
    Jason -- Thank you. I was rather surprised to have been invited in the first place and I haven't had any time to look into it on the 'net yet. I think there's going to be a whole lot of non-Jewish people there, but it seems like a lot of them have been there before. Good to know about the thing of them saying that I don't need to do something as I tend to always want to help clean and what-have-you. I'll talk to the host to see if she has any advice, especially since she's fairly by the book with her beliefs and practices.

    Beamish -- I've only had a chance to skim over that, but thank you! I'll have to give it a good read over later on tonight. Like I said to Jason, I haven't had the time to look around on the 'net.
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      CommentAuthorFinagle
    • CommentTimeMar 6th 2012
     (10478.7)
    @passover/seder

    Don't be surprised if the family doesn't behave according to your expectations. As a Gentile, you might believe that it should be a really reverent occasion, like we Christians treat our holidays. However, the last time I cooked Passover seder for an Ashkenazi family (my girlfriend at the time), her mother looked at the place set for Elijah, noted that the wine was all gone, declared that "Oh, he isn't coming anyhow," and downed Elijah's wine.

    I'm just sayin'.
  5.  (10478.8)
    @Warped Savant: I was thinking in terms of them possibly excusing you from some part of the ritual (because they find it particularly meaningful to their identity as Jews), rather than excusing you from just helping with dinner chores. :) I don't know what that might be (if anything), but as an example from my own religious background: when one of my Jewish friends came with me to a church service that included Communion, my father told him "you don't have to take the wine and bread" when he really meant "the wine and bread are only for Christians" but didn't want to sound like a jerk about it.
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      CommentAuthorglukkake
    • CommentTimeMar 6th 2012
     (10478.9)
    #adherethistothat

    So this is a weird question - I have a long rug (think something that would do well in a long hallway) under my desk/desk chair since my desk chair was scratching the shit out of my hardwood floors. But now the wheels keep dragging the rug everywhere and it's a messy pain when rolling forward and then pushing back and it's just a jumble of rug. I want to adhere the rug to the wood floor, but in a way that's somewhat removable since I'm renting? I tried using rolled up duct tape but it didn't cling to the rug hard enough and was pulled up within an hour. So help me out, handyfolks.
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      CommentAuthortaphead
    • CommentTimeMar 6th 2012
     (10478.10)
    #adherethistothat - How about using some kind of rubber mat under the rug?
    • CommentAuthorroadscum
    • CommentTimeMar 6th 2012
     (10478.11)
    #adherethistothat

    In the dim, distant past i used to deliver stuff to carpet shops. Back then there were a number of different products to stop rugs sliding around - grippy underlay, glue type goo and double sided sticky tapes. Looking about today there's still a good selection of stuff online at Amazon, can't vouch for how well any of it works though. Your best bet is probably a mooch round your local carpet and flooring shops.
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      CommentAuthorFinagle
    • CommentTimeMar 6th 2012 edited
     (10478.12)
    #adherethistothat

    Careful with using that double-sided tape. I did that at my house, and when it came up, it took all the varnish off the floor along with it. Not a huge deal if you're prepared to touch up the varnish, but just be warned if your security deposit is at stake.

    I would go for the rubber mat, possibly with velcro attached to the top of the mat.
    • CommentAuthorroadscum
    • CommentTimeMar 6th 2012
     (10478.13)
    #adherethistothat

    Ah, i should have said, these are all specially designed to be re-positionable and safely removable and yes, don't get them confused with the permanent varieties or you'll end up in a very sticky situation.
  6.  (10478.14)
    @Finagle -- I always try to go in with no expectations, and I was raised in a family that never takes anything too seriously (which can sometimes be an issue when people do take things really seriously, but in this case I think I can be smart enough to not mess this up). It sounds like it'll be a fairly relaxed party but it's really tough to say. The hostess doesn't work on Saturday's, her Chinese husband usually wears a kilt, so yeah... I really have no idea what it will be like so I'd kind of like to be ready for anything.

    @Jason Quest -- Ahhh... okay, yeah, that makes sense. There was a time where something similar to what happened with friend happened to me when I was at a Catholic funeral.
    I've known this woman for a few years and this is the first time that she has invited me to anything so I'm more concerned about not making an ass out of myself than normal (Mind you, I usually don't care at all). I'm pretty sure she'd understand if I completely flubbed something up, but it would be nice to leave with the feeling that I may be invited back again.