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  1.  (10493.141)
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      CommentAuthorFishelle
    • CommentTimeFeb 22nd 2012
     (10493.142)
    @Vornaskotti
    I'm gonna second Purple Wyrm's wiki entry there. It's quite accurate, really. Also, as far as I know, posthumous baptisms of holocaust victims don't happen anymore. And yes, the dead person does choose to accept or reject it.
    I'm just going to add, I'd think it would be obvious that where someone goes in the afterlife is based on a lot more than baptism, so if someone obviously deserves to go to hell, being baptized won't really change that (regarding Hitler and whatnot). It's all about everyone having the same chances, and if you believe that being baptized is an absolute requirement, then everyone ought to have that chance. Maybe it is silly or crazy, but I quite like being baptized for dead people. I've been doing it since I was 12 and won't be stopping any time soon. (I don't think being gay is a choice, though.)
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      CommentAuthorBeamish
    • CommentTimeFeb 22nd 2012
     (10493.143)
  2.  (10493.144)
    @Fishelle: How do they say no if they're dead? And how do the living Mormons know if the deceased that they've chosen have said no or not? And thus what is to keep the Church from claiming that everybody they've chosen to posthumously baptise have happily accepted their place in the Church, regardless of what that person's beliefs may have been in life? The Wikipedia article says that only relatives are allowed to submit names for vicarious baptism, but it doesn't specify how 'relative' is being defined. If my eight times great grandfather was the father in law of your seven times great grandmother, would you be able to submit my name if I die?
    • CommentAuthorNorbert
    • CommentTimeFeb 23rd 2012 edited
     (10493.145)
    Dogs like food:

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      CommentAuthorsneak046
    • CommentTimeFeb 23rd 2012 edited
     (10493.146)
    RE last page's Hello Kitty rifle, meet Brookie and her mean green 6.8 mm AR-15:

    6.8mm AR15, the choice of Special Forces and 13-year old girls.
  3.  (10493.147)
    @Fishelle

    Fair enough. As a somewhat religious person myself, and aware that I'm probably being somewhat offensive now, I find that practice deeply silly and more than borderline offending. Not something that should be banned or anything, mind you, but it's definitely a target for snarky criticism like the previous. I know that the idea of someone re-baptising me after I'm dead annoys the crap out of me, not that I believe I'd be saying anything about it, but you know... It's the thing about freedom of religion and freedom from religion. People can have their faith and practice it, as long as it stays in their lot and house. This stuff steps over the line.
  4.  (10493.148)
    Standing ovation.

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      CommentAuthorFoamhead
    • CommentTimeFeb 23rd 2012
     (10493.149)
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      CommentAuthorbarton
    • CommentTimeFeb 23rd 2012
     (10493.150)
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      CommentAuthorFishelle
    • CommentTimeFeb 23rd 2012
     (10493.151)
    @DavidLejeune
    Same way anyone says no to anything, I figure. We don't know, and don't claim to know, whether someone accepts or rejects something in the afterlife. The only record kept is that the baptism's been done for that person. They don't go in with the normal membership records of living people, and aren't considered Mormons. Relative is a big term, and I know lots of people that try to get every possible person in their ancestral line. And people can find the names of relatives and let other people be baptized for them, which allows for people like me to just go to the temple and not have to do a bunch of genealogy beforehand. So to answer your question, yeah.
    @Vornaskotti
    I haven't ever really understood why it would offend someone if they think it's nonsense, because then it doesn't really matter, does it? If it's not true, it's just a bunch of silly people saying dead people's names briefly in a ceremony that doesn't really matter to anyone but them. But I guess I understand a little better now. Sorry it bothers you. If it's any comfort, no one will ever be a Mormon unless they want to be, dead or not. And if you're not baptized while living, you wouldn't ever be considered a Mormon by living people, really.

    (I'm done talking about this now.)
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      CommentAuthorcelan
    • CommentTimeFeb 23rd 2012
     (10493.152)
    Ahem. And now for something completely different:
  5.  (10493.153)
  6.  (10493.154)
  7.  (10493.155)
    Greasemonkey, I see your "crappy" reporter and raise you
    Here is a professional at work:I'm sorry whitechapel
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      CommentAuthortaphead
    • CommentTimeFeb 23rd 2012
     (10493.156)
    Science has been dropped:

  8.  (10493.157)
    Meanwhile, in the student house...
  9.  (10493.158)
    Flat share for homeless females only!

    You've got to admire the guy's optimism. :)
  10.  (10493.159)
    @ JP Carpenter - Why oh why did I click that link? WHY??
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      CommentAuthoroldhat
    • CommentTimeFeb 23rd 2012
     (10493.160)