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  1.  (10525.21)
    @flecky, me too - they've released two trailers and two viral videos now. I think I've watched all of them at least three times and realised that I've got to stop so that I don't spoil the experience of actually seeing it when it gets released.

    There's also probably already slashfic of Guy Pierce and Michael Fassbender's characters so...enjoy that thought.

    @johnjones - it's taken a panning by the critics here in the UK but I admit I'm still intrigued by it. Thanks for your review.
    • CommentAuthorStefanJ
    • CommentTimeMar 20th 2012
     (10525.22)
    I read about half of the ERB Barsoom novels decades ago. I remember enough about them to know that John Carter (of MARS damnit) wasn't an exact adaptation.

    But it was a great, fun, movie and doesn't deserve the critical whomping it is getting.
    •  
      CommentAuthortaphead
    • CommentTimeMar 23rd 2012
     (10525.23)
    SHUT UP AND TAKE MY MONEY

    •  
      CommentAuthorAlan Tyson
    • CommentTimeMar 23rd 2012 edited
     (10525.24)
    I'm predicting that John Carter will go dark for a few months after its theatrical run peters out, and then become the closest thing to a cult classic that it's possible for a movie to become these days.
  2.  (10525.25)
    @taphead - yup, I've been saying that to David Cronenburg for years now. Methinks that with Cosmopolis, all the naysayers about his A Dangerous Method will be right back on board.
    •  
      CommentAuthorjohnjones
    • CommentTimeMar 24th 2012
     (10525.26)
    I think that Robert Pattinson is absolutely desperate to leave behind his Twilight fame and become the new Johnny Depp, but I'm not sure he has the chops to pull it off.
    • CommentAuthorflecky
    • CommentTimeMar 24th 2012 edited
     (10525.27)
    @taphead: Now that, that looks excellent! Any film with a giant, horrible rat cruising through the street of a city has to be worth seeing. I've still got goosebumps from the soundtrack.

    I'm so grateful for David Cronenburg for weirding me out my whole life. He's made films most directors wouldn't even have the balls to contemplate doing.
    •  
      CommentAuthorFinagle
    • CommentTimeMar 24th 2012
     (10525.28)
    How have I not seen Hobo With A Shotgun til today? This grind house trash is just what I needed to kill my brain.
    •  
      CommentAuthorOsmosis
    • CommentTimeMar 25th 2012 edited
     (10525.29)
    In more SHUT UP AND TAKE MY MONEY news:

    Pirates! An Adventure with Scientists!
    • CommentAuthorGordon
    • CommentTimeMar 25th 2012
     (10525.30)
    I was ready to give up on Hobo With a Shotgun but the school bus scene gave me a slap and told me to sit back down. From that point on it just got better and better, peaking with The Plague. They deserve their own movie!
    • CommentAuthormanglr
    • CommentTimeMar 25th 2012
     (10525.31)
    But then you need to do a double feature of 'Hobo' and 'the Mill and the Cross' for the ultimate whiplash Rutger Hauer double feature...
  3.  (10525.32)
    @johnjones - he doesn't have the chops, I'm afraid. See Bel Ami or that shite 9/11 film he did; in fact, even Water for Elephants was odd to watch as his face is so taught that he looks like he's holding about 4 expressions throughout the whole film. I'm hoping that Cosmopolis is going to be mad enough to keep the focus away from him and on weird-ass narrative and themes.

    @Osmosis - Another reason to like that film? David Tennant. According to Simon Mayo, David Tennant is "...the British George Clooney." [Also: The Doctor; enough said.]

    Hobo with a Shotgun - almost as enjoyable as The Ice Pirates [I hereby initiate the moment this thread begins to eat itself.]

    If you like filthy trash, you'll love it.

    For anyone inclined to watch The Ice Pirates [and join me in my Ron perlMANATHAON], I can recommend it on one phrase alone "The ship's got Space Herpes."

    In other news, I watched My Week with Marilyn and it's a reel [sic] shame of a film - it's a great idea, executed well but there's a massive black hole at the centre of it SUCKING all life from it - it's name is Eddie Redmayne.
    Boy can that boy not act: I never thought much to Emma Watson in the Harry Potters but next to him she's Marlon fucking Brando.
  4.  (10525.33)
    OK - I'm 2 thirds through the Ron PerlMANATHON and I thought I'd let you know what's been hitting my eyeballs.

    The Ron PerlMANIFEST:
    The Ice Pirates
    The Name of The Rose
    Mutant Chronicles
    Star Trek: Nemesis
    Cronos
    The City of Lost Children
    Hellboy
    Hellboy 2


    I've only the Hellboys left - I chose to leisurely enjoy them over late-evenings this week so as not to overdose and who knew he was great in Star Trek too?
    • CommentAuthorStefanJ
    • CommentTimeMar 25th 2012
     (10525.34)
    We Have to Talk About Kevin opened up in Portland this week. I feel conflicted; wonderful reviews, but I'd have to be in the right mood to see a film about a murderous disturbed kid. The tipping factor might be that A Separation is playing in the same theater.
    •  
      CommentAuthorFinagle
    • CommentTimeMar 26th 2012 edited
     (10525.35)
    @StefanJ -

    I found /Kevin/ to be curiously empty. There are no real plot spoilers here, but:

    You really didn't gain any insight or understanding into the personality of Kevin. He might as well be Damien from the Omen. We get some allusions to the similarities in his mother's personality, but nothing that really has explanatory value. There's no more meaning in his actions than there are in the development of his whole personality...just a bad piece of fate made incarnate.


    Now, that may be a very deliberate choice on the part of the writer (book as well as movie), but I just find that approach doesn't stick with me in the long run. Everything plays on the surface, and I don't feel that one comes away with any better understanding of anything. About actual school killings in particular, I don't think it has much offer. I still found it an attractive and interesting piece of work, but the takeaway was extremely shallow.
    • CommentAuthormanglr
    • CommentTimeMar 26th 2012
     (10525.36)
    Looking forward to catching 'The Raid' on the big screen this weekend. If you're an unrelenting action junkie, this may be up your alley.
    The Raid Trailer and synopsis
  5.  (10525.37)
    A couple of endearing documentaries that have been making the festival/art theatre rounds.

    First, No Look Pass, about the other talented Asian-American basketball player...who's also dealing with coming out as a lesbian:

    No Look Pass

    And, This Is Not A Film, in which director Jafar Panahi answers the question of what do you do when your government has put you under multi-year house arrest and banned you from making films for 20 years?

    This Is Not A Film
    • CommentAuthorlucien
    • CommentTimeMar 26th 2012
     (10525.38)
    oh the raid is excellent...nice to see silat getting a film forum....
  6.  (10525.39)
    If i was going to watch some Perlman i would have to include The Name of The Rose. Even though it was a small role for him, i found the hunchback he played to be well entertaining.
    Sean Connery, Christian Slater (before he started acting like Jack Nicholson II), and Christian Slater's Butt all put in good performances too. :)
  7.  (10525.40)
    I saw The Ides of March today and thought it a very well made film.

    Either George Clooney is getting better at his control of the camera or he's getting better cinematographers since Confessions of a Dangerous Mind because both this and Good Night, Good Luck have masterly cinematography.

    Ryan Gosling is well cast and Philip Seymour Hoffman too. It's unfortunate that the more I see of Paul Giamatti, the less I see him acting in different ways. Clooney's a difficult one to rate but thankfully, he's not the focus of the film.

    For anyone that's seen it, my favourite moment is:
    when Clooney's character, Morris, has to fire PSH's character, Paul: the scene is when Paul gets in the car and all we see is the slow track forward of the camera with the war march music playing louder, louder, louder and louder still until Paul gets out and the two cars drive away.

    The cinematographic analogy of the grinding attrition-like nature of war's effect on morals in politics was perfect.