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  1.  (10536.1)
    #niceornasty

    That could work.
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      CommentAuthortexture
    • CommentTimeMar 27th 2012
     (10536.2)
    @Jason A Quest: Thanks for the info, much appreciated.
  2.  (10536.3)
    #niceornasty

    If it were me, I'd go full-on nasty and hope for the publicity. There are other dude's-first-cookbooks out there, after all. But if you're going thru a publisher, it ultimately won't be your decision to make. So I'd include it in your proposal but offer to cut it (or move it online (good idea)) if a publisher sees it as a stumbling block.

    And let me know when it's ready, so I can buy it for my damn housemates.
    • CommentAuthorDC
    • CommentTimeMar 27th 2012
     (10536.4)
    #niceornasty
    Add sections on taking care of laundry, dusting, dealing with neighbors and roommates (remember that excellent thread on the subject of roommates?:) ) and negotiating with landlords. Also, go with the adult stuff and make the book funny.
    IMO, a smaller format would be ideal for a quick read in the middle of a crisis.
    • CommentAuthorKosmopolit
    • CommentTimeMar 27th 2012
     (10536.5)
    And you could put the words "Don't Panic" on the cover.
  3.  (10536.6)
    Maybe the e-book is a better option for the sake of convenience. I'm considering the coffee table format because I want this to be an art book, and little piddling illustrations don't really cut it.
    • CommentAuthorArgos
    • CommentTimeMar 27th 2012 edited
     (10536.7)
    #brewingwithfruit

    I want to make a cherry wheat beer once cherries are in season, and I want to use real fruit instead of extract. I've already gotten some info online and how to do this (steeping during primary fermentation vs secondary, etc.), but it's still a fairly new concept for me. I'm still not sure if I should just toss the fruit in the secondary and hope there's enough alcohol to kill any germs, or pasteurize is at 170 F and hope the pectins don't thicken. Anyone have any input on brewing with fruit?
  4.  (10536.8)
    #V/VM

    So I have been scrounging the internet for copies of V/VM's "V/VM 365" project, "Thirty Six Illegal Inches" and "The Destelbergen Remixes". I know the lovely people here in whitechapel have some esoteric taste in music. I thought maybe someone might have some MP3s they would be willing to torrent somewhere? I'm not asking for anything illegal here, these were all released for FREE back in the day with instructions to share them as you like as long as it was not for profit. Really though, since Vukzid went bye-bye these things have become impossible to find. Which just strikes me as odd, but whatever.

    This is a bit of a mundane thing to post to this board, but I figure it can't hurt to ask. Hopefully some kindly person will indulge my desire to bombard my ears with electronic insanity (that is strangely hard to come by).
    •  
      CommentAuthoroldhat
    • CommentTimeMar 27th 2012
     (10536.9)
    @brewingwithfruit!

    Okay! So! I'm going to go by Sam Calagione's advice here...AND I'm going on the assumption that we're talking a 5 gallon batch here...

    Most of the time, with cherries especially, it's been suggested to crush them and put them in at the end of your 60min boil, but it is IMPORTANT to let them steep for at least 20mins at temperatures between 160 and 170 degrees Fahrenheit.

    For sour cherries 10lbs of the suckers can be good. For sweet cherries, 8lbs is suggested. If you'd rather use a puree, do everything the same except halve the volume of cherries you're using.

    Now that said, with the beer Alan and I made, we put them in at around...30mins or so in to the boil? They were frozen as well. But it turned out quite fruity. So let it be a lesson that nothing is really set in stone. But for a safe way, above should be fine.

    To answer your question on twitter, unless you're planning on making a tripel or an imperial anything with a VERY high ABV, you don't need to worry about adding more yeast. You'll be surprised how much a small amount can do.
  5.  (10536.10)
    #niceornasty

    Does anyone else have any suggestions about the sort of stuff I should include in a guidebook for first-time home leavers?
  6.  (10536.11)
    #niceornasty

    Dealin' with da Guv'mint. Specific advice would of course be impossible as it would depend on the jurisdiction the book is currently in, but some basic advice on filling out forms (don't put "yes please" in the "sex" column, no matter how funny it might seem...), applying for benefits and assistance and how to handle run ins with the law could be something of use to many home leavers. God knows I could have done with it when I struck out on my own.
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      CommentAuthorglukkake
    • CommentTimeMar 27th 2012
     (10536.12)
    #wordpresspressgallery

    I have a wordpress template set up that lets me tag blog entries and then they don't show up in the main blog feed, but *do* show up when you go to the link for all pages with that one tag.
    So you could try to hack it together so that instead of manually entering it into one huge page, you're just writing small blog pages and then they just show up in a row.
    I hope this makes sense, because I am half dead.
  7.  (10536.13)
    #niceornasty

    Government dealing, definitely. I'm considering a section on getting in trouble with the law, too.
    • CommentAuthorFlabyo
    • CommentTimeMar 28th 2012
     (10536.14)
    #niceornasty

    I know one thing a lot of my generation (man, it feels weird saying that) messed up when leaving home was the sheer amount of things you're actually expected to pay for.

    In the UK most people would immediately know about paying for gas and electricity, and getting your phone and internet.

    But water rates? Lost track of home many friends of mine ended up with nasty water bills cause they didn't know they had to pay for that. Tax too (and the fact that in the UK if you live alone you don't have to pay the full council tax, they don't really push that so often people don't spot it).

    Remembering to register to vote each time you move house. And one that every student in the UK dreads... the TV Licence. Don't mess with the TV Licence people, they bear grudges that last a lifetime...
  8.  (10536.15)
    #niceornasty

    :) When I was a kid and I'd ask Dad for juice or pop, he'd say "have a glass of water, it's free". One of the many Lies My Father Told Me.

    But I'd be careful getting into government/legal stuff (beyond "never answer cops unless you're trying to get their help") because the differences between the US/UK/Can/Oz run the risk of cluttering it up with irrelevant stuff that doesn't apply.
  9.  (10536.16)
    #wordpresspressgallery

    Cheers - do you have a live blog where I could see how that works?
    • CommentAuthorEmperor
    • CommentTimeMar 28th 2012
     (10536.17)
    #niceornasty

    You should include a list of methods people recommend for getting high cheaply and why you shouldn't waste your time on them - I still feel queasy at the thought of nutmeg and milk burps (and even if you get it to work it isn't worth it) and banana skins? Don't bother. Although they should give jenkem a try. ;)

    Might also be worth a guide to legal highs that do work like Salvia (make sure you have someone experienced sit with you), magic mushrooms (be very sure you can identify mushrooms as you could end up eating poisonous ones - buy them from hippies if you are unsure). Chloroform is a little trippy but carcinogenic and ether is intoxicating but flammable (so don't smoke afterwards - they stopped using it medically because sparks could set off fires inside your lungs), while it can be drunk it is easier to just inhale it - both make you stink like a mad scientist's lab.

    On the recipe front a few general tips are often better than recipes - how to tell rice, pasta or potatoes are cooked, for example. Don't bother following a recipe - busk it and adjust the flavour to suit. One handy thing though might be a table of cooking times for joints of meat - always handy at Christmas or Thanksgiving. 10 great ingredients to keep stocked up (like lazy garlic, Worcester sauce, dried mixed herbs, stock cubes, tins of chopped tomatoes, etc.). What struck me when I went away to University was that any awful lot of the guys I'd met had either never cooked or had a few recipes that they stuck to religiously, when what they really needed was a grasp of the basics, which gives you confidence and transferable skills you can bring to new recipes. If you can make a quick and easy spag bol, you can make a chilli with a quick change in a couple of ingredients. Also buy some cheap tupperware boxes, make 2 or 3 times what you'll need and freeze the rest - you will never have to buy ready meals for the times you are too tired, lazy or drunk to cook (Too Drunk to Cook. That was a song wasn't it?).
  10.  (10536.18)
    #niceornasty

    This is sounding a lot like a book I received as a gift once, called "Etiquette for Outlaws,"

    Which is basically a how-to guide on everything soceity says you shouldn't do, or how to do dangerous or illegal things as safely as possible. Not a bad read, oddly enough I was fairly versed in most of the information already, but it made a good reference guide for a book I was working on at the time.
    • CommentAuthorArgos
    • CommentTimeMar 28th 2012
     (10536.19)
    #brewingwithfruit Thanks Oldhat!! I'll try that. I'd heard numerous things about when you can add the fruit and how that might affect the flavor and so on, and how adding the fruit at the end of the boil might make the overall flavor less fruity than if you add them to to secondary fermentation, but for my first go I'll go ahead and steep my cherries at the end of my boil to ensure that I don't introduce any bacteria that might lead to nasty off-flavors in my beer, knowing that yours turned out really fruity the way you did it.
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      CommentAuthoroldhat
    • CommentTimeMar 28th 2012
     (10536.20)
    #brewingwithfruit Oh! Crap! I actually forgot to mention that with ours the fruit was added to the fermentor. I forget whether or not it was part of the secondary fermentation, but it was there for the primary.