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    • CommentAuthorSolario
    • CommentTimeApr 8th 2012
     (10575.1)
    Regarding the Rhetorical fallacy chart:

    Need to remind everyone that just because an argument is based on a rhetorical fallacy, doesn't mean that it's wrong - it's shortcuts. Sometimes those shortcuts aren't fair, but it's very much up to interpretation. For example, the Reductio Ad Absurdum: When you ridicule an oponent's argument, how far is too far? "Faith in God is like believing in Santa Claus and the Tooth Fairy". How is that an unfair claim? It's hard to see how the concept of god differs from the other two. The only defenses, I could see, is either A. that the existence of god is empirically proven, or B. you use one of the other logical fallacies like an appeal to tradition or popular belief or unfalsifibility.
    I love rhetorics and argumentation theory, but it's pretty easy to shut down someone's argument by pointing out that they're using logical fallacies. Even if they're correct.

    The chart itself is a nice shortcut, but like the logical fallacies it's shortcuts, and their veracity is questionable.
    • CommentAuthorRenThing
    • CommentTimeApr 8th 2012
     (10575.2)
    @Solario

    Broken link or image, mate, because I see no chart.
  1.  (10575.3)
    @Ren

    I think Solario is referring to an earlier post regarding This
  2.  (10575.4)
    This is fascinating - I guess I just have an issue with the assumption that a specific internal state has been generated when the subject is a mouse. Specific BEHAVIOUR has been generated, sure, but it's the interpretation that I consider to be a bit of a stretch. Thoughts?
    • CommentAuthorWood
    • CommentTimeApr 9th 2012 edited
     (10575.5)
    40 years ago, in 1972 the Club of Rome in collaboration with the MIT released a report titled The Limits to Growth, using the sharpest technology in computer simulation available at the time, predicting global economic collapse around 2030. Have their predictions been correct so far? Yup, they have.

    "The world is on track for disaster" indeed.

    The good thing is, once the economy is in the can, there will be a serious decrease in global pollution, so there's that.
  3.  (10575.6)
    predicting global economic collapse around 2030


    Still 18 years left of the party...
  4.  (10575.7)
    •  
      CommentAuthorAlan Tyson
    • CommentTimeApr 9th 2012
     (10575.8)
    @JP: Or 18 years until the party starts, depending on who you are.
    • CommentAuthorWood
    • CommentTimeApr 9th 2012
     (10575.9)
    @Anchorbeard : 18 years until we can start eating the rich ?
    • CommentAuthorRenThing
    • CommentTimeApr 9th 2012
     (10575.10)
    @Wood

    I think we should start posting recipes now in the Food thread.
    • CommentAuthorArgos
    • CommentTimeApr 9th 2012
     (10575.11)
  5.  (10575.12)
    @Argos -damn. Next they'll be saying menstruation is murder. O,o
    •  
      CommentAuthorFoamhead
    • CommentTimeApr 9th 2012
     (10575.13)
    Booze in spaaace!
    Experiments using malt from the Ardbeg distillery on Islay are being carried out on the International Space Station to see how it matures without gravity.
  6.  (10575.14)
    RT reports that Netflix has created a pro-SOPA superPAC, Forbes and TechDirt dispute the claim
  7.  (10575.15)
    Iran plans to build a "national intranet" complete with government-controlled e-mail system (with a government register of all account holders real identities) and government-controlled search engine. The intranet will be competely sepaarate from the internet and access to the internet will be banned.

    link
    •  
      CommentAuthorMorac
    • CommentTimeApr 10th 2012
     (10575.16)
    Maybe we should fly in some flying server drones, like Pirate Bay is setting up.

    Apparently Greece is all over this idea.
    • CommentAuthorWood
    • CommentTimeApr 10th 2012
     (10575.17)
    Korean Scientists launch project to clone a mammoth

    It turns out that cloning scientist Hwang Woo-suk really meant it when he said last October that his next project would be to bring a mammoth back to life.

    On Tuesday, Mr. Hwang’s Sooam Bioengineering Research Institute signed an agreement with Russia’s North-Eastern Federal University to clone a mammoth, the giant elephant that went extinct several thousand years ago.

    Dr. Hwang, once hailed as national hero for his work on stem cells and cloning, fell from grace in 2005 after it was revealed that he fabricated what was then believed to be a major breakthrough in human embryonic stem cell research. He was virtually disbarred from the industry, with his license canceled. But he continued doing his experiments in animal cloning. Last October, he announced the successful cloning of a coyote.

    On Monday, nine Korean and Russian scientists got together in Seoul to discuss their joint research in details including how to retrieve DNA samples from a mammoth.

    According to the Sooam Institute, bioengineering scientists since 2002 have discovered what they believe to be the remains of a mammoth in the permafrost of Russia. Last August, it was reported that a thigh bone of a mammoth was discovered in Siberia.
    •  
      CommentAuthornigredo
    • CommentTimeApr 10th 2012
     (10575.18)
    @Morac

    April Fools'
    •  
      CommentAuthorD.J.
    • CommentTimeApr 10th 2012 edited
     (10575.19)
    Pigeons Could Poop Soap

    Tuur van Balen calls the project "Pigeon d'Or" - French for "golden pigeon." It's a two step process: 1) make pigeons poop soap. 2) Build specially designed coops to house the pigeons where they can be fed, and direct their feces onto car windshields. Understandably, the first part hasn't been easy.
    •  
      CommentAuthorMorac
    • CommentTimeApr 10th 2012
     (10575.20)
    Derp derp, don't mind me...


    *goes and hides in shame*