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      CommentAuthorAlastair
    • CommentTimeApr 29th 2012
     (10603.221)
    yeah that would be a lot more interesting if any of those were cultural touchstones all over the world
    • CommentAuthorWood
    • CommentTimeApr 29th 2012
     (10603.222)
    Seattle Attorney Andrew Basiago Claims U.S. Sent Him On Time Travels

    Since 2004, Seattle attorney Andrew Basiago has been publicly claiming that from the time he was 7 to when he was 12, he participated in "Project Pegasus," a secret U.S. government program that he says worked on teleportation and time travel under the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.
    "They trained children along with adults so they could test the mental and physical effects of time travel on kids," Basiago told The Huffington Post. "Also, children had an advantage over adults in terms of adapting to the strains of moving between past, present and future."

    Basiago said he experienced eight different time travel technologies during his stint in the program. Mostly, he said, his travel involved a teleporter based on technical papers supposedly found in pioneering mechanical engineer Nikola Tesla's New York City apartment after his death in January 1943.
    "The machine consisted of two gray elliptical booms about eight feet tall, separated by about 10 feet, between which a shimmering curtain of what Tesla called 'radiant energy' was broadcast," Basiago said. "Radiant energy is a form of energy that Tesla discovered that is latent and pervasive in the universe and has among its properties the capacity to bend time-space."
    Basiago said project participants would jump through this field of radiant energy into a vortal tunnel and "when the tunnel closed, we found ourselves at our destination."
    "One felt either as if one was moving at a great rate of speed or moving not at all, as the universe was wrapped around one's location," Basiago said.
    Basiago claimed he can be seen in a photograph of Abraham Lincoln at Gettysburg in 1863, which he said he visited in 1972 via a plasma confinement chamber located in East Hanover, N.J.
    • CommentAuthorWood
    • CommentTimeApr 29th 2012
     (10603.223)
    This dog. is. INTENSE

    Dog meets wolf
  1.  (10603.224)
    LED lights revolutionise indoor pot cultivation - way less heat and electricity.

  2.  (10603.225)
    •  
      CommentAuthorD.J.
    • CommentTimeApr 29th 2012 edited
     (10603.226)
    Man sues BMW for 20-month erection

    Which is to say, he has a 20-month erection and is suing, not that he's suing to win a 20-month erection. Personally, I'd be thanking them.
  3.  (10603.227)
    ^^ everyone says that, but priapism is extremely uncomfortable and painful.
    •  
      CommentAuthorcelan
    • CommentTimeApr 30th 2012 edited
     (10603.228)
    I'm sorry but that sets off my bullshit detector. After a time much shorter than 20 months, you'd end up in the ER where they would give you anti-boner drugs (amphetamines sometimes) and aspirate, i.e. they surgically drain the blood from the penis.
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      CommentAuthorPhilip
    • CommentTimeApr 30th 2012
     (10603.229)
    Presumably it's a recurring long-lasting (mechanical injury) erection rather than a constant erection. If he had a full erection for a few weeks the problem would presumably have solved itself. (Necrosis and auto-amputation of the offending appendage)

    Can't seem to find any similar cases though so.. Could easily be nonsense. I'm on the smarter-than-me-phone.
  4.  (10603.230)
  5.  (10603.231)
    After a time much shorter than 20 months, you'd end up in the ER where they would give you anti-boner drugs (amphetamines sometimes) and aspirate, i.e. they surgically drain the blood from the penis.


    Couldn't they just show him pictures of Newt Gingrich naked? That would non-surgically drain the blood from most penises...
    •  
      CommentAuthorcelan
    • CommentTimeApr 30th 2012
     (10603.232)
    *rimshot*
  6.  (10603.233)
    •  
      CommentAuthorcelan
    • CommentTimeApr 30th 2012
     (10603.234)
    •  
      CommentAuthorD.J.
    • CommentTimeApr 30th 2012
     (10603.235)
    •  
      CommentAuthorcelan
    • CommentTimeApr 30th 2012
     (10603.236)
    •  
      CommentAuthorFoamhead
    • CommentTimeMay 1st 2012
     (10603.237)
    The Question for the facial hair owners thread...I misses it.

    LLTGDBat-Stache!

    •  
      CommentAuthorVornaskotti
    • CommentTimeMay 1st 2012 edited
     (10603.238)
    This made me laugh, although I'm a bit "mrbhbm" about the writer lumping pretty much whatever under the heading "art". I do agree that a lot of modern art comes across as a bit pointless to me, and especially, I've yet to see a piece of video performance art featuring humans that doesn't make me cringe and think of the rabbit-rabbit-rabbit episode of Spaced. There have been some great abstract ones, though.

    I'M SICK OF PRETENDING: I DON'T "GET" ART

    You know what? I'm sick of pretending. I went to art school, wrote a dissertation called "The Elevation of Art Through Commerce: An Analysis of Charles Saatchi's Approach to the Machinery of Art Production Using Pierre Bourdieu's Theories of Distinction", have attended art openings at least once a month for the last five years, even fucking purchased pieces of it, but the other night, after attending the opening of the new Tracey Emin retrospective at the Hayward Gallery, I'm finally ready to come out and say it: I just don't think I "get" art.


    Hard to say what is the X-factor in the modern art pieces that have spoken to me. For example the Roland Persson sculptures were pretty awesome seen live. They definitely hit my urban exploration aesthetic nerve. http://riemu.net/post/17758033662/andreas-eriksson-roland-persson-amos-anderson
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      CommentAuthorsneak046
    • CommentTimeMay 1st 2012
     (10603.239)
    Ghetto Hikes


  7.  (10603.240)