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  1.  (10678.161)
    Typically, there is a list of "government approved religions" for inmates to have the option of observing. If an inmate requests to add a religion to the list, there usually must be more than one member.

    Several cases in the past have shown that inmates creating their own religions are often scams of some type of scam. Another anecdotal reference, but we're told of instances where inmates claim their religion forces them to have weekly meals with steak, lobster and wine, and rituals involving sexual acts with women.

    Regardless of the veracity of these stories, the end result is the same: the inmate can beleive or "practice" any religion he can think of, but the government agency is not required to recognize it, pay for any of his religious diet, or provide him with any of his religious materials. The government can choose to do that, for more widely recognized faiths, but can always declare that due to the unreasonable costs or safety issues, the requests can be denied.

    Another example, was the inmate that tried to make a local union for the inmate population. From what I remember, the court case permitted the inmate to form a union, though its members were not allowed to have meetings, correspondence, dues, pamphlets, or strike. (I think this is the case I'm remembering)
    • CommentAuthorWood
    • CommentTimeJun 10th 2012 edited
     (10678.162)
    "Governement approved religions" right. Just give me some time to let that idea sink in.

    As far as I'm concerned every religion is a scam one way or the other, so I don't see why only the most successful ones should be allowed... Anyway, I'm surprised the guy who invented the religion that required weekly steak meals and ritual sex with women had problems finding followers. It seems like the kind of religions that'd get successful very fast.

    Also, "native American" is a religion?
  2.  (10678.163)
    The vampire guy was the one with only one member of his religion. Steak, lobster, wine & sex guy had lots of people that wanted to join. Just the gov't told him, you can beleive in whatever you want; we just don't have to provide you with any of the things you want.

    It isn't so much that the government "approves" of the religion, I guess that's just bad wording. It's that there's a policy created to provide services, staff or volunteers, and religious materials for those religions. Generally, anything that will occupy the inmates' time, while not causing undue problems for the institution, is a good idea. We want our inmates to be occupied, calm and that thinking that following a moral or behavioral code is a good thing.
  3.  (10678.164)
    @govt spy & Wood:
    Not surprised a very new religion (to be as charitable as possible to Vampire Dude) didn't get authorized. Patrick McCollum's been trying to get California to ease up on it's Big 5 Religion list for years, and it's not like there's any lack of pagans there to prove they exist...
    • CommentAuthorKosmopolit
    • CommentTimeJun 10th 2012
     (10678.165)
    Wood, besides a lot of different relgious beliefs assocaited ith different tribes, there's the Native American Church.
    • CommentAuthor256
    • CommentTimeJun 10th 2012
     (10678.166)
    I don't see why only the most successful ones should be allowed.

    Surely that is the very definition of success.
    • CommentAuthorWood
    • CommentTimeJun 10th 2012
     (10678.167)
    @Kosmopolit : that was my point, it's not just one religion. Didn't know about that church, though.

    @256 : touché!
    • CommentAuthorWood
    • CommentTimeJun 11th 2012
     (10678.168)
    From A Bottle Of Wine, Researchers Grow A Dress
    Researchers of the FNAS laboratories, University of Western Australia, have developed a way of making seamless clothing using wine, and its fermentation process.

    I'm not sure I'm qualified to make a statement about fashion but that dress just looks like... well like it's been grown out of wine and bacteria, actually. Also :
    At early stages of development, the material would smell like red wine and feel like sludge when wet, but fits on to bodies like a second skin.
    • CommentAuthorRenThing
    • CommentTimeJun 11th 2012
     (10678.169)
    • CommentAuthorWood
    • CommentTimeJun 11th 2012
     (10678.170)
    This is a map of registered voters in Venezuela whose fist name is "Hitler"



    There is a guy in Barinas whose full name is Hitler Maolenin Leañez Aponte. There are a couple of Venezuelans called Hitler Jesús.
    •  
      CommentAuthorcelan
    • CommentTimeJun 11th 2012
     (10678.171)
    I'm sure you've all read about The Oatmeal's BearLove Good. Cancer Bad. indiegogo campaign in response to a frivolous lawsuit from FunnyJunk.
    It raised over $70K in 7 hours. Awesome.
    • CommentAuthorFlabyo
    • CommentTimeJun 12th 2012
     (10678.172)
    Thought about just posting this in the videogames thread, but it's an interesting enough peek into the utter madness of the industry I call home I thought I'd put it here.

    The rise and collapse of Yoshinori Ono

    Sure, a fairly large part of that is that famously insane Japanese work ethic, but I hear similar stories from much lower profile people in the biz all the time. Hell, I ended up in hospital myself from the stress of overwork about 8 years ago now.
    • CommentAuthorWood
    • CommentTimeJun 12th 2012 edited
     (10678.173)
    So apparently in Indiana it is now legal to shoot police officers if they illegally enter your home.
    The first of its kind in the United States, the law was adopted after the state Supreme Court went too far in one of its rulings last year, according to supporters. The case in question involved a man who assaulted an officer during a domestic violence call. The court ruled that there was “no right to reasonably resist unlawful entry by police officers.”
    The National Rifle Association lobbied for the new law, arguing that the court decision had legalized police to commit unjustified entries.
    •  
      CommentAuthorjohnjones
    • CommentTimeJun 12th 2012
     (10678.174)
    @ Wood

    I can sort of see the logic of the law. Police officers should be no more legally immune to getting shot for illegally entering someone's home than anybody else. That said, I figure the consequences of this law will be a few dead cops and more than a few dead homedwellers.
  4.  (10678.175)
    Thought about just posting this in the videogames thread, but it's an interesting enough peek into the utter madness of the industry I call home I thought I'd put it here.
    The rise and collapse of Yoshinori Ono
    Sure, a fairly large part of that is that famously insane Japanese work ethic, but I hear similar stories from much lower profile people in the biz all the time. Hell, I ended up in hospital myself from the stress of overwork about 8 years ago now.

    Well, I work in the Japanese games industry and it is true that work practices here are different than in Europe or America. Many people stay late all the time, but not all of them overwork themselves though... Still, people with responsibilities can have a lot of pressure, I imagine even more in bigger companies like Capcom. So, yeah, sad but not surprising. I've heard people in Japan saying that one reason not to hire foreigners is that it's hard to ask them to do overtime like other employees...
    •  
      CommentAuthorD.J.
    • CommentTimeJun 12th 2012 edited
     (10678.176)
    @celan
    The whole thing just seems like an opportunity for Oatmeal to drive a ton of traffic to his site, not that that's anything new. It's also worth noting that the charity campaign is in no way related to the issue and he's not actually obligated to donate more than $20k. He could pocket more than $100k right now and it's unlikely we'd ever know.
    • CommentAuthorWood
    • CommentTimeJun 12th 2012
     (10678.177)
    Man writing book about kindness in America shot, wounded
    HELENA, Montana (Reuters) - A West Virginia man who was traveling across the United States gathering material for a book about kindness in America was shot and wounded while eating lunch in Montana, police said on Monday.

    Ray Doland, 32, was hospitalized with a gunshot wound to the arm following the incident near Glasgow, Montana on Saturday, Valley County Sheriff Glen Meier said.

    Doland was still in hospital on Monday but was expected to recover, Meier said.

    He said that Doland, who was hitchhiking across the country and writing a memoir about kindness in America, had been eating lunch at a spot of historical interest and was looking for a ride.

    When Doland approached a vehicle that pulled up near him the driver opened fire, hitting him in the arm, before speeding away, Meier said.

    A suspect, identified as 52-year-old Charles Lloyd Danielson III, was later taken into custody in Culbertson, Montana, Meier said.

    "Montana is certainly full of a bunch of nice people and wonderful people and it's a shame this kind of thing happens but it just happens," Meier said.
    • CommentAuthorKosmopolit
    • CommentTimeJun 12th 2012
     (10678.178)
    @johnjones: based on my recollections of prior coverage of this case it says that if occupants believe police are on their premises illegally they have the right to open fire.

    So every tax resister-sovereign citizen nutcase has just been handed a shooting license.
    • CommentAuthorKosmopolit
    • CommentTimeJun 12th 2012
     (10678.179)
    Man writing book about kindness in America shot, wounded


    There was a similar story a few years back , not sure if it was the same guy.

    He got as far as Mississippi before before being robbed at gun-point and thrown off a bridge into a river.
  5.  (10678.180)
    Yeah, but,
    "Montana is certainly full of a bunch of nice people and wonderful people and it's a shame this kind of thing happens but it just happens," Meier said.


    I'd say the right guy is writing that book.