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      CommentAuthorBeamish
    • CommentTimeJun 10th 2012
     (10686.1)
    #LastNames

    So, a friend of mine stated that there is a European country that commonly, for a last name, will take their fathers name and will add -son or -daughter to the end i.e. OdinSON. Is this still a common practice and what country would it have been?
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      CommentAuthorOsmosis
    • CommentTimeJun 10th 2012
     (10686.2)
    #LastNames

    Sounds like Iceland to me.
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      CommentAuthorBeamish
    • CommentTimeJun 10th 2012
     (10686.3)
    Thanks!
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      CommentAuthorOsmosis
    • CommentTimeJun 10th 2012
     (10686.4)
    You're welcome, and thank you; my family name is most likely a version of a Scandinavian patronymic, so it was interesting to read that Wikipedia article all the way through.
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      CommentAuthorAlan Tyson
    • CommentTimeJun 10th 2012
     (10686.5)
    #LastNames

    As I understand it, common practice in Russia is to do this with the middle name, adding -evic (male) or -evna (female) to the end of the father's name.

    So, if my name is Vasily, and my dad's name is Ilya, and our last name is Blukov, I'd be Vasily Ilyavic Blukov. My sister Natalya would be Natalya Ilyevna Blukova.
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      CommentAuthortrini_naenae
    • CommentTimeJun 10th 2012 edited
     (10686.6)
    #Last Names

    That was the norm in Scandinavian countries for quite a while, though it seems that only Iceland still does it. It's one of the reasons why Anderson, Johnson, etc are such common names.

    Edit because I have the stupids.
  1.  (10686.7)
    #LastNames

    I believe one or other of the Scandinavian countries also used to do "Daughter of" with "Nic-". Hence, Nicolson could either be "Son of Nicol" or "Daughter of Olson". I have no idea if my info on this is at all correct :)
  2.  (10686.8)
    #LastNames

    Also, a daughter is referred to as such in the Icelandic patronymic, is she not? Hence Björk Guðmundsdóttir?
  3.  (10686.9)
    #LiteraryAgents

    Bram, I gotta warn ya, the average response time is a tricky one: I sent 4 attempts out in early April [5th to be exact] and have had 2 rejections a week ago. That's 9 weeks. I'm waiting on the other two.

    I think one thing that might be interesting is trying to start an online discussion with them - there seem to be quite a few on Twitter [though I'm still really bad at using/following/chatting through Twitter - I'm just not built for it] so that might be one avenue, as well as LinkedIn. That's my next plan.

    Even as someone who has worked for an international opera company, I'm struggling to get one. Best of luck, sir. Let us know how it goes.

    Oh and in addition to the other #LastName comments, in Wales we still use a patronymic system but ours is slightly different: we have [FirstName] [Mother'sName] ap [Father'sName]. 'Ap' means 'son of'. Interestingly, names don't always have to follow that [Mother'sName] ap [Father'sName] tradition if someone's given a particular name by an event, a place, or a teacher so it sort of becomes [AWESOMEnewName] ap [Father'sName]. This is, of course, not in fitting with UK law so most people just have one officially and keep the 'ap [Father'sName]' for Welsh situations. Hope it helps.
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      CommentAuthortexture
    • CommentTimeJun 11th 2012
     (10686.10)
    #LiteraryAgents

    Ben, thanks for this mate, great to have some feedback from someone else who's been there. I'm currently torn between finishing the project and then approaching agents, or sending out sample chapters and then finishing it, to allow for the delay in getting a rejection or response. Given you've experienced such a long wait, I may go with the latter. I'm also going to see which agents form my list are on Twitter or LinkedIn, that's a really good idea.
  4.  (10686.11)
    #aManualfortheSolarSystem

    I don't know if this exists or not, but poking Whitechapel for help /suggestions, is kind of the point of the thread.

    What I'm looking for is literature regarding space travel. Recent histories, political diatribes, scientific proposals and papers that got shelved when NASA started working for PayPal, that sort of thing. I'm researching this for stories set in a near and semi-plausible future, where we're harvesting helium-3 (for example) and basically alternatively making a mess of and exploring our solar system.

    I see articles occasionally in Popular Science, etc. But I'm looking for a big meaty book that I can chew on, or even a hefty web resource that would just take days to comb through. Wikipedia and general googling can only take me so far with this kind of thing and I feel like I'll learn faster with a few friendly pointers.
  5.  (10686.12)
    #LiteraryAgents

    Not sure if this is one of the obvious questions, but do you have anything published, at any level, currently? If so, that's at the very least going to help an agent see your worth; someone else thought you were worth publishing.

    If you're yet to be published, I'd also suggest concurrently submitting short stories or articles to publications that seem up your alley. I've been finding for myself that working on short stories hones the skills I'll use on longer pieces. (I read Alan Moore saying once that doing 5 page strips for 2000 AD served as a training ground. Once he knew he could create a solid 5 page narrative, he had greater confidence in his ability to do longer work. But I'm drifting from the agency question.)
    • CommentAuthorflecky
    • CommentTimeJun 12th 2012
     (10686.13)
    #virus-thingy

    I had that same annoyance a while back, turning random words green. For some reason, it seemed to happen more on this site. I THINK it went away and died a foul death when I started using Chrome.
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      CommentAuthorGreasemonkey
    • CommentTimeJun 12th 2012 edited
     (10686.14)
    #aManualfortheSolarSystem

    Stephen Baxter's VOYAGE, while dry and kind of unreadable, is based on Baxter's extensive knowledge of NASA's history and technology. He places the story in an alternate history in which JFK survived the assassination attempt in 1963 and continued as an advocate of space exploration, implementing the actual plans NASA drew up for a Mars mission. Baxter exhaustively describes every aspect of a hypothetical voyage to Mars (hence the extreme dryness of the novel), and there's an appendix with a large number of diagrams of the configuration of the Mars spacecraft at every point of the mission.
    • CommentAuthorKosmopolit
    • CommentTimeJun 12th 2012
     (10686.15)
    #Virus-thingie

    Avast, AdAware and Malwarebytes have all failed to remove this damned thing.

    Chrome it is.
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      CommentAuthorStoto
    • CommentTimeJun 12th 2012
     (10686.16)
    #cheekbiting

    I've always chewed the inside of my cheeks. Now, I've started biting the sides of my tongue and I have a blister that will not go away until I stop biting it. Stopping is easier said than done.

    Does anyone have any tips for smashing these habits?
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      CommentAuthordorkmuffin
    • CommentTimeJun 12th 2012
     (10686.17)
    #cheekbiting

    Honestly, finding another less harmful habit to replace it with. You may lapse but it might let your tongue heal up in the meantime. Mouths do heal quickly at least.
  6.  (10686.18)
    #cheekbiting

    I started chewing the edge of my tongue a few years ago... not really sure what lead to it, but I can't seem to break the habit either. It sounds strange, but the best thing for it that I can find is using green Crest mouthwash.
    Yeah, I know, sounds weird. Something about it seems to detach the loose bit and heals the small cuts faster than anything else. Without the small bits hanging on it makes it harder to chew on it.
    (NOTE: Swish it around, keep it in a minute or so. Little fleshy, sticky bits means that it's working.)
  7.  (10686.19)
    #cheekbiting

    If you bite them in your sleep, your dentist can have a mouthpiece made that you could wear at night to stop the biting - they're also used to keep people from grinding their teeth, but it would suffice for your purposes, too.
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      CommentAuthorStoto
    • CommentTimeJun 12th 2012
     (10686.20)
    Thanks for the suggestions.

    I don't think I do it in my sleep. It usually happens when my mind is off wandering.

    I'll invest in some decent mouthwash and perhaps pop in some chewing gum when I notice I'm doing it.