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  1.  (10702.1)
    Anyone got any plans to view the Transit of Venus (or as a friend of mine put it "Venus's sexy dance across our star") tomorrow? Last chance until 2117 you know.

    I've taken the day off work and built a sun projector out of coathangers and plastic plates. Now I've just got to hope the "cloudy periods" they're predicting for my local areas include enough sunny periods to make it worthwhile.
    • CommentAuthorStefanJ
    • CommentTimeJun 4th 2012
     (10702.2)
    The weather report for the area (Portland, OR) is grim, as far as viewing anything in the sky goes.

    The recent partial solar eclipse was visible as a murky image through the clouds.

    Bleah.
    • CommentAuthorArgos
    • CommentTimeJun 4th 2012
     (10702.3)
    it's overcast in SD right now, with the forecast predicting partial cloud cover tomorrow. *fingers crossed*
    •  
      CommentAuthorOsmosis
    • CommentTimeJun 5th 2012
     (10702.4)
    I'm planning to get up tomorrow, but, y'know. Northern England. When I look up it's like being in a Tupperware box.
    • CommentAuthorArgos
    • CommentTimeJun 5th 2012
     (10702.5)
    it is sunny, hooray! Heading down to the science center near me in like an hour so I can buy a pair of glasses to view the sun without burning my retinas, and then kill time hula hooping until Venus begins her sexy dance.
    •  
      CommentAuthorAlan Tyson
    • CommentTimeJun 5th 2012
     (10702.6)
    I'm going to try like heck, but I'm not holding out too much hope. I'm in a bad area for sky-watching.
    • CommentAuthormanglr
    • CommentTimeJun 5th 2012
     (10702.7)
    Thick clouds and rain showers in Boston. Sad panda.
    • CommentAuthor256
    • CommentTimeJun 5th 2012
     (10702.8)
    Can only see clouds? Can only see night? Can't get up at the crack of dawn?

    Get on a livestream! NASA has about a bajillion from different observatories. Here's one from the top of Mauna Kea, a mountain sacred to Hawaiians and astronomers alike.

    1st contact should be in around 15 minutes.
    • CommentAuthorStefanJ
    • CommentTimeJun 5th 2012
     (10702.9)
    Yikes . . . it's alternating between sun and overcast every few minutes in the Willamette Valley. I made a crude pinhole viewer. Fingers crossed!
    • CommentAuthor256
    • CommentTimeJun 5th 2012 edited
     (10702.10)
    1st Contact!

    edit: Images from SDO (solar dynamics observatory, in orbit around Earth):


    c/o NASA/SDO, HMI, and AIA science teams.

    2nd Contact!
  2.  (10702.11)
    The transit is starting right as I type - but the sun won't be above the horizon for an hour. It's looking good so far, some clouds but some clear patches.
    •  
      CommentAuthornigredo
    • CommentTimeJun 5th 2012
     (10702.12)
    • CommentAuthorArgos
    • CommentTimeJun 5th 2012
     (10702.13)
    woohoo, went down to my local science center museum and saw it. They ran out of sun filters, but some people were kind enough to pass them around. They also had a telescope set up so that the sun was projected onto the wall (light going from big lens to small lens), and we were able to see it really well on that, too.
    •  
      CommentAuthorPurple Wyrm
    • CommentTimeJun 5th 2012 edited
     (10702.14)
    Bah! Turns out that a 100% overcast sky just before dawn looks pretty much identical to a 100% clear sky just before dawn. No transit for me :(

    But I'm watching the Mt Wilson Observatory webcast, so it's not all bad.

    And the whole media-hooha has got some of my friends interested in going out and doing some night astronomy, so that's a bonus :)
    •  
      CommentAuthorFoamhead
    • CommentTimeJun 6th 2012
     (10702.15)
    • CommentAuthor256
    • CommentTimeJun 6th 2012
     (10702.16)
    Stayed up watching the broadcast from Hawaii until about half way thru the transit, then slept and got up at dawn to see if I could view the end of it in person, but it was not to be - 100% cloud cover. Alas.

    A truly remarkable event. One of the best bits, oddly, was hearing scientists atop Mauna Kea wonder what the world will be like at the next transit, and reading aloud the same thoughts written down by another scientist at the transit of Venus in 1769.

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