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      CommentAuthorStoto
    • CommentTimeJun 24th 2012
     (10733.1)
    G'day, Whitechaplers.

    We've already got some great threads floating around with podcast recommendations (Recommend me some podcasts/Recommended Podcast Listing/Podcasts And Podcasters), but I'm hoping this can be a spot to post individual episodes of podcasts or radio shows that need to be heard. Much in the same vein as the TV, book, movie and other awesome threads.

    Only rule is no music, because you can plonk that in the Listening Thread.

    I'll kick it off with Alex's recent submission from Around the Net:

    BBC World documentary on science fiction in Africa hosted by Lauren Beukes
  1.  (10733.2)
    A bit random, but this is one of my most favorite interviews I've heard on the BBC World Service.

    Michael Caine is awesome.
    •  
      CommentAuthorTF
    • CommentTimeJun 25th 2012
     (10733.3)
    I really like when Jay Mohr gets his manager to speak on his podcast Mohr Stories.

    It's a good free kick up the ass no matter what field you're trying to achieve in - but - for someone trying to write professionally it illustrated for me where the standard is set in the entertainment industry.

    Mohr stories 47
    • CommentAuthorRenThing
    • CommentTimeJun 25th 2012
     (10733.4)
    A friend and I read horrible books and review them so you don't have to at Your Book is Why Daddy Drinks. Dreamhost had a catastrophic server failure (as in they let the magic smoke out) and we're still sorting out the website. Most of the content is at the blog, our latest episode is here.
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      CommentAuthorStoto
    • CommentTimeJun 25th 2012
     (10733.5)
    @Rachæl Tyrell

    I really enjoyed listening to that. Such a lovely bloke!
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      CommentAuthorStoto
    • CommentTimeJun 25th 2012
     (10733.6)
    Another one from AROUND THE NET (thanks, magnusisasillyname).

    Stewart Lee and Richard Herring back together again. (Hour and a half of comedy gold)
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      CommentAuthorStoto
    • CommentTimeJun 26th 2012
     (10733.7)
    As an expat myself, the latest episode of This American Life was rather enjoyable.

    467: AMERICANS IN CHINA
    It used to be that the American expats in China were the big shots. They had the money, the status, the know-how. But that's changed. What's it like to be an American living in China now? And what do they understand about China that we don't?


    Also, while I remember. Act Three of episode 164: Crime Scene, is the best bit of radio I've heard in a while. The recordings of the kids are just gold.

    ACT THREE. A CRIMINAL RETURNS TO THE SCENE OF THE CRIME.
    Sometimes criminals return to the scene of their misdeeds—to try to make things right, to try to undo the past. Katie Davis reports on her neighbor Bobby, who returned to the scene where he robbed people and conned people...to coach Little League.
  2.  (10733.8)
    Thrilling Adventure Hour #76 Frank and Sadie Doyle in the 'Beyond Belief' segments of Thrilling Adventure Hour are kind of a gag on Nick and Nora Charles from 'The Thin Man.' In this episode they find a magic bottle.
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      CommentAuthorStoto
    • CommentTimeJul 2nd 2012
     (10733.9)
    Science Weekly podcast: David Nutt reveals the truth about drugs
    Professor David Nutt discusses his book Drugs – Without the Hot Air, and argues that society's prohibition of psychedelic substances is preventing groundbreaking science.

    Especially enjoyed hearing how the ISDC evaluate the harmfulness of various drugs in this one. David Nutt seems like a top bloke.

    Big Ideas: Marc Lewis - Memoirs of an Addicted Brain
    Dr. Marc D. Lewis discusses the years he spent addicted to drugs including morphine and heroin, and links his first-hand drug experiences to his current behavioral science research into the interaction between drugs and brain chemistry.

    This guy loses points for sounding a bit self-indulgent when he talks about his own experiences, but there's some good stuff about neuroscience and addiction.
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      CommentAuthorStoto
    • CommentTimeJul 10th 2012
     (10733.10)
    •  
      CommentAuthornelzbub
    • CommentTimeJul 12th 2012
     (10733.11)
    While I'd hesitate to say that this needs to be heard, here's a cross post from the drugs thread.
    A couple of months ago I was interviewed for a podcast about my experience working in the coffeeshop industry in Amsterdam, with specific reference to the potential changes that may be happening in the coming months.
    It's essentially half an hour of me spouting my opinions.
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      CommentAuthorStoto
    • CommentTimeJul 12th 2012
     (10733.12)
    Cheers, nelzbub. I'm pretty intolerant to cannabis so often don't pay a lot of attention to what's going on with it. I enjoyed hearing your rational stance. The changes sound like they're going to be pretty damaging. Best of luck with your business.

    Cross post from AROUND THE NET: Alan Moore, Marcus Du Sautoy, Adam Rutherford discuss symmetry on the latest episode of The Infinite Monkey Cage. (Thanks, a ethic whelp)

    Psychtalkradio - Sexism in Language
    A thought provoking discussion on “male generics”. Think this whole aspect of social linguistics is pretty interesting. Would like to hear more about how language reinforces all other '-isms'.

    Sound Body - Transfiguration
    Gruesome and moving story of Dallas Weins, the first US full face transplant patient.

    99% Invisible - The Best Beer in the World
    The story behind Trappist beers. I knew nothing about this before listening. 99% Invisible is always good but this episode was fascinating.

    HowSound - A Square Meal, Regardless
    “A Square Meal, Regardless” follows the last days of John Gallagher with his caring friend Cedric Chambers. John is dying of cancer and Cedric radically changed his life to take care of him.
    Jen Nathan produced “A Square Meal, Regardless” in 2007 and struggles with feelings of guilt for trespassing on their lives. Interesting talk about the moral ambiguity of documenting people's private moments.

    RSA - Connectome: How the brain’s wiring makes us who we are
    Sebastian Seung, talks about mapping the “connectome”, in the hope of understanding the basis of personality, identity, intelligence, memory, and perhaps disorders such as autism and schizophrenia.
  3.  (10733.13)
    I don't know if these will be accessible outwith the UK, (there may be podcasts) but I have just finished listening to the last of this years Reith Lectures. On the BBC website there is an archive from 1948 onwards. This years was very entertaining, previous years have been at the least informative.