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  1.  (10885.1)
    One of the things that bothers me about this is that this is confirming what I've been saying about Disney's current trajectory and which has accelerated since Roy Disney's death. They are no longer an animation company and now a company that sole function is is to acquire outside properties. If they had enough money to purchase Lucasfilms, it's kind of sad that Disney cries poverty when they say they can't afford to produce more of their own animation. I've worked at Disney and in the short time I was there I saw the amount of actual artists that were working on the Disney lot decrease and the amount of lawyers and pencil pushers increase. Currently, most of the productions are being produced in Glendale and not on the Burbank lot. I think that says a lot right there about Disney's intentions.
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      CommentAuthorAlan Tyson
    • CommentTimeOct 31st 2012
     (10885.2)
    Theory: This was never about Star Wars (or Indiana Jones, for that matter). I think Disney want's Lucasfilm so they can get Industrial Light and Magic.

    Disney is losing Pixar in, I believe, one more movie. That's the end of that particular cash cow for them, so I wonder if they're going back to the farm to try and get another one. Remember that ILM is where Pixar started (mostly). I think ILM would be a better long-term ivnestment for Disney than even a franchise as popular and successful as Star Wars. Think of all the other studios who come to ILM for their effects - now they'll be coming, at least in part, to Disney.
    • CommentAuthorRenThing
    • CommentTimeOct 31st 2012
     (10885.3)
    My thoughts on it: If they make more SW films then we get more SW films. If they suck, I won't watch them, if they don't suck, yay more SW films.
    • CommentAuthorFlabyo
    • CommentTimeOct 31st 2012
     (10885.4)
    @RenThing - That's basically where I stand on this one too, apart from my concerns over the Lucasarts games division.
  2.  (10885.5)
    Disney is losing Pixar in, I believe, one more movie.
    Nope. Pixar is a wholly owned subsidiary. 'Cars' was originally the last movie Pixar was going to do for Disney, and then Steve Jobs sold his controlling share of Pixar over, but cut some crazy deal that gave Pixar complete creative control over their films and made John Lasseter Disney Animation's Chief Creative Officer.

    That doesn't preclude licensing stuff out, Epic Mickey for example,
    Epic Mickey wasn't licensed out. Junction Point is owned by Disney Interactive. Disney Interactive has actually been pulling a lot of the licenses back in-house (there will probably never be a Pixar tie-in game developed or published by a third party again, for example). The thing about LucasArts is that they haven't really been doing a lot in-house development themselves lately (I think the Monkey Island Special Editions were their most recent 100% in-house releases), they've just been a licensing house. It's probably going to be business as usual for them for the foreseeable.
    • CommentAuthorRenThing
    • CommentTimeOct 31st 2012
     (10885.6)
    @Flabyo - I have a friend who used to work there and she called up some of her friends who were still with the company. Disney focuses a lot on browser and mobile games and so the outlook right now is kind of bleak.
  3.  (10885.7)
    There's never been anything wrong with any of the prequels that wouldn't have been fixed by A GOOD SCRIPT.

    Number one, Lucas is crap at heroic dialogue. That doesn't matter if your story is serious enough. But if you want us to believe the fate of the galaxy lies in the hands of three kids and an old guy with flashy swords, you had BETTER wow us with dialogue that at least resembles the conversations young people who might not survive would actually have.
  4.  (10885.8)
    I don't know what you're talking about!
    "I hate sand, it gets everywhere. But your skin is soft."
    • CommentAuthorRenThing
    • CommentTimeNov 1st 2012
     (10885.9)
    Well, my opinion of George just went up: George Lucas is going to spend $4 billion on funding education.
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      CommentAuthoroldhat
    • CommentTimeNov 1st 2012
     (10885.10)
    That's amazing and I give props to him, but that's not going to suddenly make me love the prequels.

    [/hrumph]
    • CommentAuthorRenThing
    • CommentTimeNov 1st 2012 edited
     (10885.11)
    Well, no, and it shouldn't; they're lukewarm dog vomit served on a CGI plate. However, I do think it speaks highly of him.
    • CommentAuthorRenThing
    • CommentTimeNov 1st 2012
     (10885.12)
    • CommentAuthorkmcleod
    • CommentTimeNov 1st 2012
     (10885.13)
    Remake/Remodel: Star Wars Episode VII?
    • CommentAuthor256
    • CommentTimeNov 2nd 2012
     (10885.14)
    @kmcl - that's a hell of an idea. perhaps best to wait to see how different disney's copyright regime is to lucasfilm's, though.
  5.  (10885.15)
    From Cartoon Brew:

    "Disney’s $4.05 billion acquisition of Lucasfilm has generated more questions than answers. The Mouse has made it clear that they bought Lucasfilm for one thing, and one thing only: the Star Wars property.

    But Lucasfilm’s business also includes other components such as Skywalker Sound and the visual effects studio Industrial Light and Magic (ILM). The fate of these entities remains unknown and will likely remain so for the foreseeable future.

    For example, what to make of ILM’s promising start as a producer of animated features? Don’t forget that ILM’s first original film Rango won an Oscar earlier this year for Best Animated Feature. But Disney already owns its own feature animation studio as well as Pixar. It hardly needs a third studio, especially one that offers an original take on computer animation that could make the work of its other studios look formulaic by comparison. In other words, it’s a likely bet that ILM won’t be making any more animated features of its own.


    The rest here:

    http://www.cartoonbrew.com/disney/disneylucasfilm-what-does-it-mean-72685.html
    • CommentAuthorArgos
    • CommentTimeNov 2nd 2012
     (10885.16)
    ^^ That just made me sad :(
  6.  (10885.17)
    @Argos- me too. :/

    I work in animation so I had probably a different immediate take on this news than some who do not. Most had a "Good! Lucas fucked up the prequels, so I'm glad this is happening", instead of "one of the largest independent movie studios is no longer independent".

    I'm curious what Dark Horse is going to do without the Star Wars comics. Also, I think the future of Clone Wars on Cartoon Network is doubtful. My guess if there will be more seasons of CW, it might end up on Disney XD or another Disney owned network.
  7.  (10885.18)
    I stopped caring about Star Wars quite a while ago. All I see here is one of the Big Six media conglomerates getting even bigger.

    It's kind of like when Jim Lee sold WildStorm to DC: nice for him, I suppose, but seeing a creator's artistic vision replaced by a legacy corporation's control... isn't something that excites me in a good way.
    •  
      CommentAuthorTF
    • CommentTimeNov 2nd 2012
     (10885.19)
    God I would have thought ILM were a strong brand in themselves and as such bullet proof.

    I always thought ILM was the business George cared about, a way to be in movies and the technology of moving images without having to... work. I always looked at the Star Wars prequels as being a tool that provided ILM with the R'n'D budget to develop new CG techniques/abilities (Scale, move the camera, textures/fur etc.)
    • CommentAuthorFlxzr
    • CommentTimeNov 2nd 2012
     (10885.20)
    I think there was a time when ILM were incredibly strong as their own brand. It used to be that nobody else could do what they did as well as they did, but times have changed and they're now just another VFX company. I'm probably talking rubbish but it felt to me that when LotR films came out and didn't have effects done by ILM it was like the end of an era. Suddenly people were talking about Weta as the power-house in visual effects.