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    •  
      CommentAuthoroldhat
    • CommentTimeMar 14th 2013 edited
     (10957.1)
    Weird. You'd think his views would have more weight.

    Also, never heard the word "wetback" before so looked it up. What asshole invented that word?
    • CommentAuthorArgos
    • CommentTimeMar 14th 2013
     (10957.2)
    Omg, you just made me want to move to Canada. I grew up knowing the word wetback. Also, beaner, which can be offensive but is also funny cos we do eat a lot of beans.
    •  
      CommentAuthoroldhat
    • CommentTimeMar 14th 2013
     (10957.3)
    BEANER? What the hell?
    • CommentAuthorArgos
    • CommentTimeMar 14th 2013
     (10957.4)
    Yup. *cries*
    • CommentAuthorG. Foyle
    • CommentTimeMar 14th 2013
     (10957.5)
    Good friend of mine (very caucasian) has a two year old daughter he affectionately calls his 'little bean.' We met up with a mexican friend of ours we hadn't seen in a couple years, and the dad introduced her as his 'frijolita'. Our friend grinned and said, 'I know you didn't mean anything by that, but you'd really be better off if you never call her that in public. ' The dad's face, as it morphed from total puzzlement to understanding of how that might be taken was pretty hilarious.
    • CommentAuthorStefanJ
    • CommentTimeMar 14th 2013
     (10957.6)
    A few years back I read Mark Twain's Roughing It, about his stage coach journey out west as a teenager. Twain would likely, at the time, be considered pretty fair-minded, but at one point he casually refers to the Mexican staff at a coach stop as "beaners."

    Gave me a real "WHAT?" feeling, reading that.
    • CommentAuthorRenThing
    • CommentTimeMar 14th 2013
     (10957.7)
    @StefanJ - He also uses the word "nigger" in his fiction. *shrug* That was the language back then.
  1.  (10957.8)
    Daily Mail: Space Sex causes Cancer

    (the Daily Mail adds to the long list of things it claims can cause cancer, although this is possibly the strangest)
    •  
      CommentAuthoroldhat
    • CommentTimeMar 14th 2013
     (10957.9)
    @lazarus

  2.  (10957.10)
    @Oldhat - I saw Shatner at Comic Con on the weekend. He looked surprisingly like that.
  3.  (10957.11)
    This article is from back in 2009, but reads so like something from The Onion that I had to share...

    Savvy Hard Shoe Shuffle

    ''Phat pants give the illusion you don't have any feet and you are gliding across the ground when you shuffle,'' Zach said.
    •  
      CommentAuthorcurb
    • CommentTimeMar 15th 2013
     (10957.12)
    Speaking of the Pope...

    Vatican Sticks With Nazi Theme
    •  
      CommentAuthoroldhat
    • CommentTimeMar 15th 2013
     (10957.13)
    So a friend of mine whom I went to college with just let me know about this personal project of hers that brings people constant news on The Sun. It's movements, emissions and even breakthroughs being made in to Solar Energy. She wants to set up a site for it but in the meantime she's started this facebook page. I really suggest you check it out.

    THE SUN.
    •  
      CommentAuthorteasmaid
    • CommentTimeMar 15th 2013
     (10957.14)
    • CommentAuthorWood
    • CommentTimeMar 17th 2013
     (10957.15)
    Google Reader’s demise is awful for Iranians, who use it to avoid censorship

    RSS readers take raw feeds of data—headline, text, timestamp, etc.—and display that information in a stripped-down interface along with many other feeds, which is what makes them so efficient. (Here is the RSS feed for Quartz.) Less obvious is how many RSS readers, including Google’s, serve as anti-censorship tools for people living under oppressive regimes. That’s because it’s actually Google’s servers, located in the US or another country with uncensored internet, that accesses each feed. So a web user in Iran just needs access to google.com/reader in order to read websites that would otherwise be blocked.

    And, indeed, Google Reader has long been accessible in Iran, where it is the most popular RSS reader. Iran would probably have to block all of Google and its many popular services in order to keep its citizens from using Reader. YouTube, by contrast, is easier to censor, though it is also owned by Google, because the video site is located on its own domain, youtube.com. Reader is also harder, though not impossible, to block because it uses more secure technology known as HTTPS.


    See what you've done, Google ?
    •  
      CommentAuthordorkmuffin
    • CommentTimeMar 17th 2013
     (10957.16)
    @Wood, when Google Reader discontinued their social function there was a HUGE backlash because of this exact reason. People in Iran and other countries with oppressive regimes and internet censorship were using Google Reader as a social networking tool that enabled them to speak freely.

    It made my friends' (and my) complaints about losing the ability to post comments on inane design articles we were sharing seem ... pretty trivial. It's an enormous bummer that they discontinued social, and even more of a bummer that the service is disappearing altogether.
    •  
      CommentAuthorglukkake
    • CommentTimeMar 17th 2013
     (10957.17)
    I'm really hoping they try to fold it into the chrome browser or something. I hope that the Iranians/others can use one of the many clones that are coming out?
  4.  (10957.18)
    There is a Chrome add on called Brief that is also an RSS reader. Hopefully that can work for them.
  5.  (10957.19)
    Surely that's no good, though? If the RSS reader is part of your browser, your machine will still be accessing the censored sites. You need the work to be being done on a server at an inconvenient-to-block address.
    •  
      CommentAuthorDoc Ocassi
    • CommentTimeMar 18th 2013
     (10957.20)
    Anyone who has concerns regarding security and anonymity, especially in oppressive regimes should use Tor.

    And anyone who in interested in helping and can should run a Tor relay.