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      CommentAuthorsneak046
    • CommentTimeAug 18th 2013 edited
     (11025.1)


    Glenn Greenwald's partner detained at Heathrow airport for nine hours


    David Miranda, who lives with Glenn Greenwald, was returning from a trip to Berlin when he was stopped by officers at 8.05am and informed that he was to be questioned under schedule 7 of the Terrorism Act 2000. The controversial law, which applies only at airports, ports and border areas, allows officers to stop, search, question and detain individuals.

    The 28-year-old was held for nine hours, the maximum the law allows before officers must release or formally arrest the individual. According to official figures, most examinations under schedule 7 – over 97% – last under an hour, and only one in 2,000 people detained are kept for more than six hours.

    Miranda was released, but officials confiscated electronics equipment including his mobile phone, laptop, camera, memory sticks, DVDs and games consoles.
    •  
      CommentAuthorsneak046
    • CommentTimeAug 19th 2013 edited
     (11025.2)
    Moscow's mayoral election takes turn for the esoteric:

    Meet the Mayoral Candidate Who Believes Russia Will Vanquish the Antichrist



    On Friday, Mikhail Degtyarev, the Liberal Democratic Party's candidate, indulged in some apocalyptic thinking and said he believes Russia will lead the world in vanquishing the Antichrist. But when it comes to Degtyarev's political shenanigans, that's just the tip of the iceberg.

    Meet the man who not only would like to lead Moscow in battle against Satan, but would also like to give women two days leave from work every month during menstruation.

    For Degtyarev, the battle between good and evil is one that plays out in intensely nationalist terms. "I can say as a believer that I believe in the apocalypse from the point of view of faith. And I think we must prepare," Degtyarev said on Friday. "I believe that we'll defeat the Antichrist -- I'm sure of it -- and that Russia will lead the fight against the Antichrist."

    But Degtyarev has no patience for the portended apocalypses of other religions. Late last year, he launched a campaign to stop Russian media from reporting on the possibility that the end of the Mayan calendar foretold the end of the world. "In our compatriots' interests, we ask you to pay attention to the dissemination of pseudo-scientific information about the end of the world in your media," he said in addressing the coverage.

    Incidentally, Degtyarev serves as the deputy head of the science and technology committee in the Duma.

    But Degtyarev isn't just a kooky crusader for Christ. He's perhaps best known for his initiative to give women paid leave during menstruation. Last month, he introduced a bill in the Duma that would require employers to provide their female employees two days off every month during what he called their "critical days."
    •  
      CommentAuthorOsmosis
    • CommentTimeAug 19th 2013 edited
     (11025.3)
    On the Miranda case, this NY Times story has more that makes it seem less like he was stopped because he is married to Glenn Greenwald, and more that he was stopped because he was carrying documents from Laura Poitras, the journalist who is working with Snowden and Greenwald on the ongoing leaks.
    Mr. Miranda was in Berlin to deliver documents related to Mr. Greenwald’s investigation into government surveillance to Ms. Poitras, Mr. Greenwald said. Ms. Poitras, in turn, gave Mr. Miranda different documents to pass to Mr. Greenwald.
    Which makes sense, right? Knowing what Greenwald, Poitras, and Snowden do about the NSA, you're not going to communicate electronically - at all, if possible.
    Those documents, which were stored on encrypted thumb drives, were confiscated by airport security, Mr. Greenwald said. All of the documents came from the trove of materials provided to the two journalists by Mr. Snowden. The British authorities seized all of his electronic media — including video games, DVDs and data storage devices — and did not return them, Mr. Greenwald said.
    A lot of Snowden's leaks have been about GCHQ - I don't think it's too surprising that someone carrying British government secrets through the UK would be stopped. Is it an example of a scary law I wasn't aware the government had? Certainly. Is it reasonless victimisation of this man? I don't think it is.
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      CommentAuthorCat Vincent
    • CommentTimeAug 19th 2013 edited
     (11025.4)
    @Osmosis: I agree it's playing hardball to detain Miranda (and also that it's not the "picking on me" story Greenwald's framing it as), but I'm seriously worried about Greenwald's tradecraft if he gave critical data to his boyfriend to take past customs...

    If you're going to send out that sort of data and you don't want it found, several other options spring to mind: top of my list would be multiple copies on encrypted Micro-SD cards sent via DHL inside other (metallic) objects looking like gifts. Decryption key sent in pieces by snailmail or based on data the recipient already has.
    • CommentAuthorRenThing
    • CommentTimeAug 19th 2013
     (11025.5)
    Does anyone have any relatively bias-free news information on Egypt? I'm getting so much fucking spin I don't know who's the asshole and who isn't and I'd rather like to know what the details are about what's going on over there.
    • CommentAuthorScrymgeour
    • CommentTimeAug 19th 2013
     (11025.6)
    @renThing
    where are you based?
    • CommentAuthorRenThing
    • CommentTimeAug 19th 2013
     (11025.7)
    United States. It's hard to parse the info from the "We like Egypt" to "Those damn Muslims starting up shit" to "Who really cares what's happening, they're just ferners".
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      CommentAuthorsneak046
    • CommentTimeAug 19th 2013 edited
     (11025.8)
    @catvincent, @osmosis the bigger point here is that it was an 'anti-terrorism' law used to detain Miranda. We have final proof that in the eyes of those in power, leaking and/or investigative journalism (depending on yr point of view) is by definition terrorism. Either that or it is fairly strong proof of the function-creep principle in action - in which laws invoked for one purpose end up being used for other, less clear-cut situations.


    I just find the notion of people being detained at the border with no right of silence and legal representation to be worrying and open to abuse. There's a story on Al-Jazeera about a guy who keeps getting detained at airports because (he says) he refused to be an MI5 informer. I'll look to see if I can backtrack and find it.
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      CommentAuthorsneak046
    • CommentTimeAug 19th 2013 edited
     (11025.9)
    @Renthing - I find Passport (the Foreign Policy blog) to be a good source of factual reporting.


    http://blog.foreignpolicy.com/
    • CommentAuthorScrymgeour
    • CommentTimeAug 19th 2013
     (11025.10)
    @Renthing
    Call me old fashioned but I'm a big fan of the bbc
    I also like Al Jazeera
    •  
      CommentAuthorOsmosis
    • CommentTimeAug 19th 2013 edited
     (11025.11)
    IANAL! But I've spent a little while perusing the Terrorism Act 2000.

    I think there are a couple of interpretations. The Terrorism Act 2000 allows for detention whether or not there are any grounds to believe the detainee is a terrorist, for the purposes of determining whether or not they are a terrorist. There may have been a process of "this chap is coming through, what do we have to hold him and grab his laptop, TA2000, that'll do, 'ello 'ello sonny jim." After nine hours, "gosh, he wasn't a terrorist after all, mind 'ow you go sir." If that's the case, I'd agree with you - this would be using a law for something it's not intended for and decidedly shady (but still not, I don't think, illegal).

    The other interpretation is that acts 'designed seriously to interfere with or seriously to disrupt an electronic system' are 'terrorism' under the act, and that's all the justification needed to detain someone suspected to be helping leak GCHQ material.
  1.  (11025.12)
    There's around 60,000 people a year detained under Schedule 7. Function creep is pretty much a given. The most unusual thing about Miranda's detention is that it lasted for 9 hours.
    •  
      CommentAuthorsneak046
    • CommentTimeAug 19th 2013
     (11025.13)
    fair points, definitely.
    • CommentAuthorRenThing
    • CommentTimeAug 19th 2013
     (11025.14)
    @sneak046, Scrymgeour

    Thank you very much!
    • CommentAuthorFlabyo
    • CommentTimeAug 20th 2013
     (11025.15)
    The BBC's reporting on Eqypt probably isn't as bias free as you'd like...
    • CommentAuthoricelandbob
    • CommentTimeAug 20th 2013
     (11025.16)
    on a much lighter note...

    SLAYER GRAFFITI CONFUSED AS HATE CRIME

    • CommentAuthorandycon
    • CommentTimeAug 20th 2013
     (11025.17)
    Even more funny considering Tom Araya is super Catholic
    • CommentAuthorOxbrow
    • CommentTimeAug 20th 2013 edited
     (11025.18)
    oops, aimed at ATN.
    • CommentAuthorScrymgeour
    • CommentTimeAug 21st 2013
     (11025.19)
    @Flaybo, I don't think any reporting will be completely objective, but the BBC seem to be covering quite a lot of stuff from both sides. They generally seem quite calm and disinterested too which is a bonus for me
    • CommentAuthorScrymgeour
    • CommentTimeAug 21st 2013
     (11025.20)
    Also this
    NOW KNOW YE that We by Our Prerogative Royal and of Our especial grace,
    certain knowledge and mere motion do by this Our Charter for Us, Our Heirs and
    Successors will, ordain and declare as follows:.....
    6. The independence of the BBC
    (1) The BBC shall be independent in all matters concerning the content of its output, the
    times and manner in which this is supplied, and in the management of its affairs.

    signed Liz