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      CommentAuthorAlastair
    • CommentTimeApr 14th 2013
     (11045.41)
    @curb cheers man. i'm pretty stoked with them
  1.  (11045.42)
    If we're talking 40k I recently painted these guys up. They're the the first figures I've painted in years and I'm astonished at how well they turned out.

    Bones' Bludgers

    (front row, left to right) Leo, Sergeant Bones, Uncle Ivan, (back row, left to right) Cousin Merl, Big Hungry Joe, Sweeny Patch, Big McLargehuge.

    I gave them names solely so I could yell things like "You bastard! You killed Sweeny Patch!" during games :)
    •  
      CommentAuthorcurb
    • CommentTimeApr 15th 2013
     (11045.43)
    Very nice!
    •  
      CommentAuthorLokiZero
    • CommentTimeApr 15th 2013
     (11045.44)
    The aftermath:



    We were down two players, but it turned out better than I expected! Next up: Thistletop.

    •  
      CommentAuthorLokiZero
    • CommentTimeApr 15th 2013
     (11045.45)
    haha so glad I got that bong water pipe in the shot.
    •  
      CommentAuthorAlastair
    • CommentTimeApr 15th 2013
     (11045.46)
    nice! on both counts
    •  
      CommentAuthorBeamish
    • CommentTimeApr 15th 2013
     (11045.47)
    I am really hoping that this gets funded. I am just really getting into tabletop gaming, curse you Wil Wheaton.
    • CommentAuthorRenThing
    • CommentTimeApr 17th 2013
     (11045.48)
    This is the Kickstarter for the second game by Christopher Badell, who designed Sentinels of the Multiverse, Galactic Strikeforce. It's a cooperative deck building game and I got to beta test it. A lot of fun!
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      CommentAuthorLokiZero
    • CommentTimeMay 9th 2013
     (11045.49)
    I think this is my best one so far: Thistletop Dungeon Lvl 1

    • CommentAuthorStefanJ
    • CommentTimeMay 9th 2013
     (11045.50)
    @LokiZero: What do you use to generate maps?

    I'm still hung up on pencils and graph paper. I should really update my tools . . .
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      CommentAuthorLokiZero
    • CommentTimeMay 10th 2013
     (11045.51)
    I put the maps together in Photoshop at 300 dpi, to scale, which generates some ginormous files. Then I flatten it, save it as a PDF, and print it out at Kinko's. THEN I decoupage it onto cardboard or foam core board and chop it up like a puzzle so I can put the rooms down one at a time as my players are exploring.

    It's getting a bit out of control, but I love it.
    •  
      CommentAuthorjohnjones
    • CommentTimeMay 13th 2013 edited
     (11045.52)
    I've been looking at stuff from Lamentations of the Flame Princess because I'd heard interesting things about it. While there are some creative, occasionally cool ideas that run through it, there also this weird thread of player resentment in there as well. The Author's notes in some of the modules put me in the mind of a first time GM who had a player group waltz through his "supermodule" and now really, really wants to get them back.

    Aside from that, I'm really getting back into TORG, which feels almost like a game version of Peter Gabriel in that there's so many concepts in it that feel advanced even for today. The cards, especially, are an example of this. Here's a look and explanation of one of them:



    You can't really tell it here, but each card has a gray border and a yellow border depending on how it's being used. The gray border is for when it's being used by a player, in this case as a Hero card which would act as an addition roll again to generate a higher roll.

    Player's card are divided into two locations, the Hand and the Pool. In combat (or some other form of round play) a player may only play card that are in his pool. Every time a player has his character take an action that moves the scene along, whether it's successful or not, the player can move a card from his hand to his pool. Any cards in a pool may be played separated or together. If a player has six cards in a pool, he can play all six to combine their bonuses to his action.

    For this card there's the ID number, 64, so that if the scenario breaks up for the night that player can get his card back when play resumes. And "They Strike" is just a little flavor text.

    The lines by S and D are the Encounter lines. If an encounter is Standard, you'd use the S line. If it's Dramatic, use the D line. A Standard encounter generally has the odds in the Players' favor. A Dramatic encounter stacks the odd against the players and is generally used at the climax of an Act or scenario. The H and V on the lines indicate the Heroes (players) and Villains (opposition). In both lines, the Heroes go first on this card. A "-" beside the H or V indicates no special effect while text like "Fatigue" or "Up" means that side enjoys (or suffers) some special condition. Put all together during a conflict and then lines generate an ebb and flow to the conflict much like that of a book or movie.

    The Approved Action line indicates action that the players can attempt during the conflict that will get them more cards to play in their hands, In this case they can attempt an active Defense or try to Taunt their opposition. This encourages players to do something other than "I try to hit him again." This is the way that players build the really big hands hands and pools they need to defeat really powerful opponents or accomplish extremely difficult actions.

    The Skill part of the card is for Dramatic Skill Resolution tasks. This is used when the Players have to accomplish some specific multi-part task under time pressure. The letters indication which portion of the task they can accomplish in a given round. In this case they could accomplish parts A, B or both. Say they have to defuse a bomb and the steps for doing this are: A) Remove the bomb case; B) Disable the motion detector; C) Determine the detonator wire and D) Cut the wire. On this card they could Remove the case, disable the motion detector or, if they were feeling lucky or pressed for time, try to do both. They could not find the detonator wire (C) or cut it (D) unless they went straight to trying to fully solve the problem, which would make thing much more difficulty for them and is generally only used when time has run out to solve the problem.
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      CommentAuthorcurb
    • CommentTimeJun 3rd 2013
     (11045.53)
    So, I recently tried Carcassonne: Explorers. Not sure how it compares to the original, as I've not tried that, but damn is it one Zen little game! Perfect for a relaxed gaming session, when you just want to chat as you lay down some tiles ...

    ... Well, for now at least. I'm sure once we start playing more tactically, and deliberately blocking each other out, it's gonna get MEAN.

    Also had my first game of A Touch of Evil last week. Based on how well the first game out went, I can't wait to play it again. Everyone picked it up really easily, but I can just tell there's tonnes of depth and nuance waiting to be explored. Plus, I had terrible luck throughout, yet still really enjoyed myself - definitely a good sign.
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      CommentAuthorsneak046
    • CommentTimeJun 3rd 2013 edited
     (11045.54)
    RenThing:
    SoTM is great. A friend of mine has a full set of the expansions. Which card are you?

    I've been playing a bunch of other stuff recently, but the highlights include Descent, Android Netrunner, Keyflower, and a LOTR-based strategy/eurogame that I've forgotten the name of.

    Oh and Zombicide, which is fantastic fun. Essentially very simple but I enjoy taking a bunch of undead out with a teenage chainsaw wielding roller skater girl.
    •  
      CommentAuthorAlan Tyson
    • CommentTimeJun 3rd 2013 edited
     (11045.55)
    My roommate is planning on running a one-shot D&D game with me and some good friends, and wants to go all-out for the map and terrain.

    We've been batting ideas back and forth (because I'm, as a player, kind of immune to spoilers, in that they don't detract from the joy of playing) and we decided that some of the terrain is going to be Jell-O, and that, pending certain conditions, this terrain will disappear, and we as the players will have to eat it.
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      CommentAuthorcjkoger
    • CommentTimeJun 3rd 2013
     (11045.56)
    @Sneak046 Zombiecide is do much rowdy fun. We have been loving it. I've used to to pull several "non-gamer" friends a bit deeper in.

    I started a Warhammer Fantasy escalation summer league today at a local shop. 1 win, 1 loss so far with my greenskin horde. It was good to dust off the old stuff, grab a couple new things, and start rolling stupid amounts of d6s. I'll have to throw up pictures soon of my units as I finish up some paint jobs.
    • CommentAuthorRenThing
    • CommentTimeJun 4th 2013
     (11045.57)
    @sneak046

    I'm in the most recent expansion, Shattered Timelines. I'm Matt Hayes (not my last name), one of the Hayes Gang in the Silver Gulch environment. My friend Tyler Hayes also had a card named after him. Christopher Badell decided to make us into bad guys because we're friends of his and have been responsible for making SotM big in the Bay Area in California.
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      CommentAuthorsneak046
    • CommentTimeJun 4th 2013
     (11045.58)
    Sweet, I've played the silver gulch deck but I don't remember your card popping up. I'll demand a game with my mate and look out for you!
    • CommentAuthorRenThing
    • CommentTimeJun 4th 2013
     (11045.59)
    I'm the one with a monocle and the red vest.
    •  
      CommentAuthorjohnjones
    • CommentTimeJun 9th 2013
     (11045.60)
    So Lamentations of the Flame Princess put out a game/setting called Carcosa. Presumably this is the same Carcosa noted in Call of Cthulhu scenarios that feature the play, The King in Yellow. In practice it plays out as being a weird kit-bash of Conan and FATAL. The mechanics are essentially the same as that of LotFP - a semi-update version of Basic D&D with a few differenced.

    So, let's start with the "dice conventions." In Carcosa not only are Hit Points and Weapon Damage random, the degree of randomness in any given encounter is also random. Here's how this works: Whenever the PCs get involved in a battle, they first roll a D20. This tells them what kind of dice to roll for their hit points. 1-4: d4, 5-8, d6, etc. This happens every conflict. Meanwhile, whenever the characters or their enemies hit with a weapon they roll all six die types (4, 6, 8, 10, 12 and 20). The number on the d20 tells which one of the other 5 dice you read for the damage. So, if in a roll your results were d4=3, d6=1, d8=5, d10=9, d12=2 and d20=18, your weapon did 2 points of damage against whatever it was.

    While the dice mechanics seem needlessly complex, class choices are very simple. You can play a Fighter or a Sorcerer and that's it. Sorcerers, btw, have the same attack bonuses as Fighters, which is good because their Sorcerous Rituals are completely useless in most encounters since they require elaborate preparations and usually take hours to cast. Generally, the rituals are all variants on a theme, Contact Thingie, Conjure Thingie, Banish Thingie, Bind/Control Thingie, Imprison Thingie and Torture Thingie. Contacting a Thingie lets a sorcerer communicate with it, presumably to gain knowledge, etc. Conjuring a Thingie calls it forth phyiscally. Banishing a Thingie forces it to flee. Bind/Control forces obedience. Imprisoning forces a Thingie to remain in some specific place until some other sorcerer calls it up again. Torture, well, tortures a thingie to make the Binding easier or automatic. Except for Banishing, all of these Rituals take hours of time, potentially age a sorcerer unnaturally and requiring the sacrifice of humans. Oh, and at first level, a Sorcerer starts with exactly none of them. All rituals have to be found in play.

    There are thirteen races available for play. They're humans of different colors. Along with your somewhat normal Black, White, Red and Yellow are Jale, Dolm and Ulfire. There's really no other difference between them aside from color though their is the notation that the races can't interbreed.

    All characters have one fairly low chance at gaining Psionics (they have to have at least a 15 in Int, Wis or Cha. 18s in all three stats still gives on a 12% of having Psionics). Assuming a character is doubly lucky enough to have psionics (once force having high attributes and once for making the Psi roll) he gets to roll a d4 each day to determine how many powers are available to him during a day. Further rolls are made to determine which of eight (Clairaudience, Clairvoyance, ESP, Mental Blast, Mind Control, Precognition, Telekinesis or Telepathy) are available. Psychic powers can be used a number of times per day depending on a character's level (take the character's level, divide by 2 and round up with anything 9 or above counting as 9). A 6th level character could use psychic powers 3 times a day. And that's any use of psychic power. If the guy got Clairaudience, Telepathy, Telekinesis and Mental Blast, he could use Mental Blast three times and that would be it, or use Clairaudience twice and Telepathy once, like that.

    The book goes on to describe various tech treasure available which include anything from a blaster pistol to some bizarre pit that randomly creating oozing monstrosities.

    There are a number of Sorcerous rituals to be found. Let's take a look at one, shall we?

    The Ecstatic Ritesof the Subterrene

    These rites make possible the contacting of a primal
    and feral subterranean god. The Sorcerer must obtain a
    Dolm virgin female of 14 years as the sacrifice. He must
    also acquire the erotic drugs and learning scribed by the
    Snake-Men in their forbidden tomes. Lastly, the Sorcerer
    must find twelve assistants (all of them male Sorcerers of
    lower level than himself) and instruct them in the ways
    of the ritual. In an underground cavern the Sorcerer, his
    assistants, and the sacrifice inhale the drugs and begin
    the rite. The Sorcerer and his assistants practice the
    debased sexual acts prescribed by the Snake-Men upon
    the sacrifice, which will lead to her death in 21–26 hours.
    During this time the Sorcerer can receive revelations from
    this feral god.


    Now, the above ritual is the best example of why I despise this game. Read that thing over again and really let the implications sink in. If you want to contact this feral, primal, subterranean god, you and your 12 little sorcerer buddies need to kidnap a 14 year old girl and rape her to death over 20-odd hours or so. Meanwhile, this is all treated with the cold, gamespeak dispassion of any other spell. Amber rod, check. Silk, check. Okay, let's cast Lightning Bolt. Here: Drugs, check. Book of snake-man sex torture, check. Twelve other sorcerer dudes, check. Virgin girl we're gonna rape to death, check. Okay, let's do this thing.

    The next part is a monster manual, followed by a bunch of encounter hexes and a sample adventure, but by that point I'd pretty much lost all heart and interest in this thing after the previous ritual and another one where you tie "a Purple female virgin of no more than 13 years and no less than 9" to a rock so she'll die of heatstroke and dehydration in the desert sun and you can torture a Violet Mist and make it do what you want. Oh, before she dies you also need to "obtain the weird copperish metal of the Snake-Men that, when melted, is merely warm to the touch" and be sure to "cover her naked body with the melted metal." At this point "Over the next 2–3 days the Sorcerer intermittently chants and performs cryptic signs while the desert sun claims the sacrifice." Presumably also over this time the dying 9-13 year old naked little girl is begging for her life, but fuck it, that's no concern when you're trying to torture a Violet Mist, right?

    So yeah, fuck this game right in the empty hole where its heart should be. Don't give these people your money and discourage others from doing so as well in order to perform the Cashless Prisoning of the Empty Wallet and thus cause this game to sink from sight, ne'er to be seen by the eyes of men again.