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      CommentAuthorCOMTE
    • CommentTimeMay 12th 2014
     (11237.1)
    I think I have a new roommate. BTW, she has 25 toes, so I think she's found the perfect place to fit in...My New Roomie
  1.  (11237.2)
    Possibly stupid and/or off-topic question- does clicking on the Youtube button on Youtube videos no longer work for anyone else? It only seems to happen on this forum, and works fine elsewhere.
    •  
      CommentAuthorTF
    • CommentTimeMay 13th 2014
     (11237.3)
    batflec

    It bodes well that Snyder announced this on twitter with a product placement tweet. He's clearly a passionate man.
    •  
      CommentAuthorTF
    • CommentTimeMay 13th 2014 edited
     (11237.4)
    Test video for James



    Answer:

    Doesn't work for me either.
  2.  (11237.5)
    Weird, but thanks for checking. Now I can stop glaring darkly at my computer. :)
    • CommentAuthorWood
    • CommentTimeMay 13th 2014
     (11237.6)
    The youtube thing doesn't work for me either on this forum.
  3.  (11237.7)
    It's not just here, by the way. It happens on another forum I use as well, so I honestly couldn't tell whether it was my PC being a dick or if there's some change to how Youtube links to itself, or maybe just forum software. Either way, knowing it's the internet being obnoxious is a bit of a relief.

    Oh, and it also just started happening last week. So whatever it is, it's pretty new.
  4.  (11237.8)
    CRACKED guest article from a former Biggest Loser contestant.

    Reality show producers are even bigger cunts than I'd imagined.
    •  
      CommentAuthoroldhat
    • CommentTimeMay 13th 2014
     (11237.9)
    WELP.

    • CommentAuthorStefanJ
    • CommentTimeMay 13th 2014 edited
     (11237.10)
    @oldhat: Funny coincidence; the lastest "The Oatmeal" strip, in which the Tesla Model S is reviewed, compares the car to "A Ferrari that got porked by a Luck Dragon."

    http://theoatmeal.com/comics/tesla_model_s
    • CommentAuthorWood
    • CommentTimeMay 13th 2014
     (11237.11)
    I don't think i needed or deserved to see a dragon's dick through a windshield today.

    Is that dragon from a particular videogame or something?
  5.  (11237.12)
    Re: Youtube on Whitechapel: I think it's a forum software thing. Fullscreening the embeds here has never worked for me, the Watch on Youtube links only recently stopped working.
    • CommentAuthorKradlum
    • CommentTimeMay 14th 2014
     (11237.13)
    The buttons work for me (Chrome Version 34.0.1847.131 m) but I think they didn't a couple of days ago.
    •  
      CommentAuthorglukkake
    • CommentTimeMay 14th 2014
     (11237.14)
    DAMMIT! I wanted to send this to a friend but the fucking URL gives the surprise away =\
  6.  (11237.15)
    Yep, Youtube button working again here, too. No idea what that was all about but it's fixed now.



    This supercomputer simulation shows one of the most violent events in the universe: a pair of neutron stars colliding, merging and forming a black hole. A neutron star is the compressed core left behind when a star born with between eight and 30 times the sun's mass explodes as a supernova. Neutron stars pack about 1.5 times the mass of the sun — equivalent to about half a million Earths — into a ball just 12 miles (20 km) across.

    As the simulation begins, we view an unequally matched pair of neutron stars weighing 1.4 and 1.7 solar masses. They are separated by only about 11 miles, slightly less distance than their own diameters. Redder colors show regions of progressively lower density.

    As the stars spiral toward each other, intense tides begin to deform them, possibly cracking their crusts. Neutron stars possess incredible density, but their surfaces are comparatively thin, with densities about a million times greater than gold. Their interiors crush matter to a much greater degree densities rise by 100 million times in their centers. To begin to imagine such mind-boggling densities, consider that a cubic centimeter of neutron star matter outweighs Mount Everest.

    By 7 milliseconds, tidal forces overwhelm and shatter the lesser star. Its superdense contents erupt into the system and curl a spiral arm of incredibly hot material. At 13 milliseconds, the more massive star has accumulated too much mass to support it against gravity and collapses, and a new black hole is born. The black hole's event horizon — its point of no return — is shown by the gray sphere. While most of the matter from both neutron stars will fall into the black hole, some of the less dense, faster moving matter manages to orbit around it, quickly forming a large and rapidly rotating torus. This torus extends for about 124 miles (200 km) and contains the equivalent of 1/5th the mass of our sun.
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      CommentAuthoroldhat
    • CommentTimeMay 14th 2014
     (11237.16)
    @glu,

    Tinyurl is your friend.

    http://tinyurl.com/q7qsrhh
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