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  1.  (1215.1)
    Simple question really. The other day I was reading Sean Philips studio tour over at CBR. He remarked about not having a set of action figures based on the "Marvel Zombies" series he did. At my comic shop today they had a set of the little creepy things. I thought it would be nice to pick them up and send them to him since after all he's a favorite artist of mine and anyone who brings Criminal into the world deserves many gifts.

    What's the best way to go about doing this? Should I send it to Marvel asking them to forward it on? Should I add on an additional amount of postage? Anyone done this sort of thing before?

    I want to respect a creators privacy, last thing I want to be is one of those people who send Neil Gaiman their hair for him to bless or something.
    • CommentAuthormunin218
    • CommentTimeFeb 29th 2008
     (1215.2)
    Good question.
    •  
      CommentAuthorYskaya
    • CommentTimeFeb 29th 2008
     (1215.3)
    Aquire adress and send. Don't expect a big 'thank you'. That's your gift, right? ;)
  2.  (1215.4)
    Aquire adress and send. Don't expect a big 'thank you'. That's your gift, right? ;)

    Well, I always expect sexual favors from any gift, but that's just common courtesy. This adds nothing.
    • CommentAuthorStefanJ
    • CommentTimeFeb 29th 2008
     (1215.5)
    Yes, good question. I've been wondering how to send Warren a puppy.
    •  
      CommentAuthorAriana
    • CommentTimeFeb 29th 2008 edited
     (1215.6)
    I want to respect a creators privacy, last thing I want to be is one of those people who send Neil Gaiman their hair for him to bless or something.
    Ehhhh... That's what a random present from a complete stranger always is. I know you're not creepy folk, but that's because I've actually spent some time aware of your existence-- not so for a creator you forward on a gift to. It's a kind thought, wanting to thank someone that's made something you enjoy, but the better way to thank someone is by buying more of their stuff, and talking them up to your friends. Anything else is just invading their space with stuff from a stranger.

    Again, I absolutely know you had the best intentions, but I'm going to close this one because it has the potential to start crossing some lines about protecting people's privacy and respecting their space. Edit: No, on second thought, you're all smarter than that. Going to leave it open if there's some further dialogue to be had.
    •  
      CommentAuthorZ
    • CommentTimeFeb 29th 2008
     (1215.7)
    I'll play the devil's advocate to say I've seen and read about artists receiving gifts at events (signings, etc.) such as their favourite brand of pen, a blank book to jot/sketch in, and things of that nature.

    However, a signing is give & take. You're giving them your money, your gratitude (be it in the form of a gift or not), and they're giving you time and consideration and a signature.

    Getting an anonymous gift from a stranger? There's a fine line.

    Recently a reader of mine's father died. Never met the guy or their dad (RIP). The reader did, on the other hand, end up missing a signing by an authour I was a fan of. When I went to the signing I purchased a second copy of the book, asked the authour to make it out to the reader's name, then asked the shop to hold it. I forwarded the reader the shop's information.

    Technically, that was a random gift from a stranger to a stranger. On the other hand, I don't know the reader's last name and chose not to invade their privacy by asking for mailing info.

    * * *



    - Z
  3.  (1215.8)
    Recently a reader of mine's father died. Never met the guy or their dad (RIP). The reader did, on the other hand, end up missing a signing by an authour I was a fan of. When I went to the signing I purchased a second copy of the book, asked the authour to make it out to the reader's name, then asked the shop to hold it. I forwarded the reader the shop's information.


    Yes, that is simply quite mensch-ish Z.
    •  
      CommentAuthorZ
    • CommentTimeFeb 29th 2008 edited
     (1215.9)
    Er... I guess.

    I'm just glad the shop said they'd mail it to the reader for free if they couldn't make it into the shop in the near future.

    Wasn't sure if I should bring a stamp with me or something.

    - Z
  4.  (1215.10)
    Orwell,

    If your worried about the appropriateness of it I have an idea.

    See if you can find a few people who are also fans to give you a few dollars and go in on it with you. This has a few advantages, its not one fan bought him a gift, its a couple of his fans did, at a few dollars a piece and sent it to him as a group thank you. Such a group gift lacks the stalker-ish overtone you might be worried about: "my fans sent this to me" seems much more casual then "a fan sent this to me."
    •  
      CommentAuthorZ
    • CommentTimeFeb 29th 2008
     (1215.11)
    Or, you know, they're the League Of Extraordinary Geekdom: one holding the ductape, one holding the ball gag, and one holding the blow torch.

    Just saying, it takes more than one good intention to pave the road to hell.

    I'm not saying that's the case in this situation; it just happens to be an imperfect approach.

    - Z
  5.  (1215.12)
    Ariana: Thanks for leaving this open. I completely understand what you said, if anything an experience I had with a random gift has made me more mindful. I received a big variety box of chocolates arrive with no note via UPS at my home, not my office and addressed to my full name, not the shortened one I use at work. The packing slip listed only the candy company and it took about 6 phone calls to figure out who sent it. Turned out the client's son had google-stalked me a bit, found my name and found my home address and sent the package there. Well meaning, nice chocolate, kind of freaky.

    Jtraub: The group send idea is a fine one.
    •  
      CommentAuthorZ
    • CommentTimeMar 1st 2008
     (1215.13)
    @orwellseyes

    I said to Mr Phillips, paraphrasing, "in regards to mail, I assume that Marvel is likely to have a PO box for you."

    Direct quote from Mr Phillips:
    <blockquote>Marvel will indeed forward any mail sent to me there.

    Sean</blockquote>
    According to the Marvel.co.uk website, their office address there is:
    <strong>Marvel Entertainment International Ltd.
    Europa House
    54 Great Marlborough St.
    London
    W1F 7JU, England</strong>

    And there you have it. I'd recommend including 'ATTN: Sean Phillips' or 'Sean Phillips C/O Marvel' somewhere on the package, on the item, and on any intelligently worded & brief thank you note you include. These are, of course, only suggestions.

    Cheers,
    - Z
  6.  (1215.14)
    It's not like you're randomly sending him an article he didn't request, or asking for anything in return. It's a simple "thank you" for doing awesome work, a show of appreciation. He can hardly be put off by an unexpected bit of admiration like that, no?
  7.  (1215.15)
    Here's the deal. We make the comic. You buy the comic. End of transaction. Nothing else required.
    • CommentAuthorWilf
    • CommentTimeMar 12th 2008
     (1215.16)
    Here's the deal. We make the comic. You buy the comic. End of transaction. Nothing else required


    Seriously?

    Ah....anyone got any ideas on how to recall that box of kitten-bits I just posted?
  8.  (1215.17)
    How about the drawings I sent to Neil Gaiman of me and him as wolf-furries spooning naked with an enclosed condom with my phone number written on?

    Was that unnecessary too? :D
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      CommentAuthorroque
    • CommentTimeMar 12th 2008
     (1215.18)
    @alwayscrashing-- you can just pay for my fucking keyboard, bitch ajsfdkjalsdfj

    once, a semi-celebrity of whom I'm a fan went through a tragedy similar to something I've been through. when my tragedy happened, I made a CD mix about it, and I had the idea of sending this same mix to the celebrity. she had an open e-mail address, so I sent her a note explaining and asking if she would find it too creepy and stalkerish if I sent her this mix. she said that she didn't feel comfortable giving out a personal address to fans, no matter how nice, and her employers weren't keen on forwarding her packages because of the possible risk involved. she seemed touched by the thought and for the sympathy, though. later on, I came to realize what the artists have been saying above-- the best gift you can give is to buy their stuff and spread word of their creations to other people.
    • CommentAuthorepalicki
    • CommentTimeMar 12th 2008
     (1215.19)
    Anecdote One: I went to a Harlan Ellison speaking engagement in suburban Cleveland about 5 years ago. Because I'd recently re-read Slippage, I stopped at the local grocer and picked up three rolls of chocolate Necco wafers, which Harlan had mentioned liking. I offered him the candy and he said, "no, thank you. I don't need any Neccos. I've got a whole room full of the fucking things at home." He ended up taking one of the packages, but I was more than a little embarrassed for not realizing until that moment that I was not, in fact, the only person to have read Slippage.

    Anecdote Two: A friend of mine worked for a number of years at the Barnes & Noble in Union Square. The bookstore had organized an appearance by a writer whose credits include work on one of the Star Trek TV series. Before the scheduled signing, my friend asked the writer if there was anything he needed. His response: "Yeah. Hand sanitizer and a big cardboard box, for all the shit they're going to give me."

    Conclusion: Defer to Warren's response. It's a kind enough gesture, but on balance, it appears to be unnecessary and unappreciated. And you're very likely not the only one who's thought of it...
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      CommentAuthorZ
    • CommentTimeMar 12th 2008
     (1215.20)
    <strong>@epalicki </strong>

    Great stories. =]

    - Z