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  1.  (1252.1)
    Artists: Have you tried a Tablet PC for drawing and if so, how was it compared to the cheaper Wacom Tablets? (Bamboo)

    I am starting a design course and I need something that is useful on a couple levels The more useful with less crap to carry the better.
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      CommentAuthorMegaGoosey
    • CommentTimeMar 4th 2008
     (1252.2)
    Some Tablet PCs have screens made by Wacom, which work better than a standard tablet. However, if art is the only thing you're going to be doing on it I would have to recommend the Intuos (the bamboo is really for people just playing around with photos), that is unless you have a shitload of money to spend on a Cintiq.
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      CommentAuthorFC
    • CommentTimeMar 4th 2008
     (1252.3)
    even a Graphire is better than a Bamboo, i'm told.

    I own both an Intuos 2 and Graphire 4, and use the Graphire far more due to space and portability constraints. it's a small addition to your laptop bag and really is all you need in most cases, unless you really want to do a lot of detail in one sitting.

    If you are looking in to Tablet PCs, have a look at levels of sensitivity, what sort of density the screen has as far as sensors as well as tilt sensitivity and overall durability.

    Have played around with classmate's Cintiq 12"... at $999 retail, is a fair bit more affordable than their 18 and 21" models with wonderful sensitivity, durability, overall design. That's still a whole extra piece of equipment though, if you're looking in to portability.
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      CommentAuthorTristan
    • CommentTimeMar 4th 2008
     (1252.4)
    Save you money stick with a tablet.

    it's all about your ability to draw. So if you weren't Michelangelo before your tablet PC don't expect to be anywhere closer to him when you wallet is 1000 dollars lighter.
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      CommentAuthorFC
    • CommentTimeMar 4th 2008 edited
     (1252.5)
    At the same time, while it'd be possible for Michelangelo to do anything with any media, no matter how basic or complex, presenting someone with talent with a box of crayons might not provide for the greatest potential for that artist, no?

    Sometimes it can be rather troublesome to be bothered or restricted by the media with which one is working when a good idea is in the works.
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      CommentAuthorTed
    • CommentTimeMar 4th 2008
     (1252.6)
    I've got a Bamboo, and whilst it isn't as sensitive as perhaps it could be, it's not bad at all considering it's the cheapest Wacom range currently made.

    That said, I wouldn't recommend it to a proper artist...just someone like me who wants to piss around and try it out for low-subtlety pics.
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      CommentAuthorTristan
    • CommentTimeMar 4th 2008
     (1252.7)
    Sometimes it can be rather troublesome to be bothered or restricted by the media with which one is working when a good idea is in the works.


    Florence Chan, Wacom is the INDUSTRY STANDARD on graphics tablets. Hank has presented us with a tablet pc vs a Wacom query; the Wacom is HARDLY the box of crayons you suggest they are.


    I've been using the same Wacom tablet i bought back in 1997 and it works well, serial port and all. I'd be more than willing to show you the wide range of detailed artwork i've been able to achieve using this "box of crayons."
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      CommentAuthorFC
    • CommentTimeMar 4th 2008
     (1252.8)
    Tristan, I'm not sure at what point you found my comments offensive, but I apologize if I've done so unknowingly.

    I don't believe at any point in my post did i specifically say WACOM = CRAYONS, nor will you ever find argument from me re: Wacom being industry standard - there is simply hands down no other tablet maker that compares. in fact, if you look back and read carefully, I am very appreciative of their products. The one exception is the Bamboo, which from the specs provided on their website and from various reviews is really not the sharpest tool in the toolbox for those looking for use for art-making.
  2.  (1252.9)
    woah woah woah. I was asking about the tablet more out of sheer laziness and love for my lower back, since Ill have to lug either (or Both) around.

    I previously picked up one of the medium Bamboo fun tablets (which seems to have replaced the Graphires (except the blue tooth)) to get used to using a pen and pad (the last light pen i played with was in 1991.)

    for the record, i am NOT any great shakes at drawing, so the Design program i'm entering is mostly to break my balls and challenge me. I just wanted a few opinions about whether or not I should ponder a tablet PC over a Wacom Tablet, and what user's experiences were. Honestly I wish the damn tablet had a hair more texture so it didnt feel like i was writing on glass.
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      CommentAuthorMeatgun
    • CommentTimeMar 4th 2008
     (1252.10)
    I just picked up the Thinkpad X61 Tablet/laptop, Found Here and I love it. The tablet technology is made by wacom, which was the main thing for me, at this point and time I wouldn't use anything else. Its still fairly light weight even with the larger battery (which you MUST get) and its a hell of a computer on its own. It is pricey, but you get what you pay for. If you are looking for something a bit more portable and still being able to produce high quality art on I highly recommend it.
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      CommentAuthorFC
    • CommentTimeMar 4th 2008 edited
     (1252.11)
    @Meatgun : Did it come with any specifics as to levels of sensitivity/tilt sensitivity? I can't seem to find specs on the actual tablet screen part of it and their spec .pdf lists info on all the other hardware, but doesn't mention specifics about the screen (aside from the fact that it swivels). Am i missing something off their info page? I think i've seen something comparable from the Mac side of things with 512 levels of sensitivity and no tilt (Axiom's Axiotron Modbook) and am curious if Lenovos are using the same sensitivity.
  3.  (1252.12)
    The X61 looks very sexy. Have a Toshiba M200 tablet at the moment which is not exactly excelling in the tablet department - the penclips break after about thirty, seconds the pen drivers have died and the screen randomly flipped itself due to a dodgy catch. Plus dust gets behind the screen mask. Not a great investment, to be honest - bought it for photo editing and music programming but never really made it work well for either.

    I certainly can't draw with it, but then again that's not exactly the fault of the tablet.
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      CommentAuthorFC
    • CommentTimeMar 4th 2008
     (1252.13)
    @hank RE: tablet surface being too smooth - if this bugs you too much, you can get around this to a certain degree by overlaying it with a bit of semi-transparent vellum or even just a plain piece of paper.
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      CommentAuthorTristan
    • CommentTimeMar 4th 2008
     (1252.14)
    agreed

    I see the appeal to drawing on the screen. It's easier.

    If you NEVER draw traditionally or at least draw digitally 90% of the time you'll probably feel like a pig in mud with one.

    If you DO draw traditionally it probably just gonna make you want to grab a piece of paper. It emulates trad. drawing close but not close enough. I keep feeling like I'm drawing on a UPS pad.

    there's no grit of the paper. I can press down hard but it gets slippery instead of catching from the friction of the graphite/ink surface.

    Those things may sound like aesthetic pleasures but they're not; they're necessary sensory feedback.

    So, Tablet PC's are an easier way to work digitally but I don't believe it creates a final product that couldn't be repeated using a regular tablet.

    The real power is in the software but if you draw traditionally don't expect a Tablet PC to be anything more like drawing on a real surface. It's just like a regular tablet but you're drawing on your screen.

    If your work looks great as it is with your standard Wacom save your money until someday these things are "affordable." You'll probably less likely to experience cognitive dissonance.
  4.  (1252.15)
    If your work looks great as it is with


    hahahaha


    i <3 you for even having that much faith in me.

    i have many hours of relearning even basic drawing.

    chants

    not gonna be rob liefield... not gonna be rob liefield... not gonna be rob liefield...
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      CommentAuthorPaul Sizer
    • CommentTimeMar 4th 2008 edited
     (1252.16)
    Strangely, the real breakthrough for me being able to use my Intuos tablet for doing inking and real drawing was to purchase the "felt pen" nibs for your stylus that you can purchase from Wacom. $4.95 for a pack of 5.

    FELT PEN NIBS

    They have enough drag and the feel of a Micron pen so I don't feel like I'm trying to draw on a formica counter top when I use the Wacom. I tried putting paper on the tablet previously to remedy this, but these new nibs just ROCK! I've done my last 5 drawings directly with the Wacom, it's great!
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      CommentAuthorstsparky
    • CommentTimeMar 4th 2008
     (1252.17)
    Hoping my replacement stylus comes, my toddler broke the first one ...
  5.  (1252.18)
    Who the fuck wants to be Rob Liefield?

    If you're going to be doing simple design work, and aren't at all concerned with fine drawing, and portability is highly important, then I'd recommend most brands of Tablet PC over a notebook-plus-Bamboo. The Thinkpad recommended above looks really nice although it's a bit pricey -- you can get a good laptop plus a 6x8" Intuos 3 for less casheesh.
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      CommentAuthorYskaya
    • CommentTimeMar 5th 2008
     (1252.19)
    Paul Sizer Would you happen to know if those feltnibs fit on a graphire pen too?

    *mumbles: probably not, should've just bought the intuos, not that that matters now gripe gripe argh! :-)
  6.  (1252.20)
    @ScottBieser

    That was a prayer and an oath.