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      CommentAuthorcurb
    • CommentTimeMar 8th 2008
     (1286.21)
    I think unknowable, interdimensional terrors work well for writers because, by virtue of allways hiding just out of sight, they can pop up virtually anywhere. Also, 'they want their old world back' is usually all the explanation needed for whatever subsequent weirdness or carnage that occurs. As norton mentioned, 2000ad writers seem particualary fond of using this device. Necronauts and the most recent series of Stickleback were both thoroughly entertaining, if a little lazy. Caballistics Inc has taken a slightly more biblical approach to its monsters, but still has a definate Cthulu vibe, including references to Nyarlahotep (sic). It also referenced Carnacki, briefly.
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      CommentAuthorslybyron
    • CommentTimeMar 10th 2008
     (1286.22)
    @Nigredo

    The gnostic issue with Invisibles is complicated. The Archons' otherness can also be attributed to the otherworldly agents of Barbelith, who look for all the world like Roswell alien spacemen, and they abduct people like Dane McGowan & Mason Lang throughout the series. R.A. Wilson's Cosmic Trigger posits that humankind has always needed help from outside, and that we get that help in the form of intelligent beings that are otherworldly but fit into the way we see the world at any given point in history; they used to appear as djinns, ancestors, gods, angels, familiar spirits, etc., and now they look like aliens, because that jives with our current, more materialistic paradigm.

    Grant's use of the grey aliens seems in accordance with that, which is not to say that he was thinking about that at the time he was writing, or when he had his own abduction experience or whatever; he & R.A.W. just seem to agree a whole lot.

    And did anybody else think that the 3-D Blazing World appearance of Nyarlathotep in the Black Dossier was inspired?
  1.  (1286.23)
    You might want to check out the man who heavily influenced Lovecraft -- Arthur Machen.

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