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  1.  (136.1)
    A interesting article about a monstrous particle accelerator in the monumental cold war style, abandoned at the Texas deep ground.
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      CommentAuthorJohn Smith
    • CommentTimeDec 4th 2007
     (136.2)
    Good stuff. I remember reading about this when I was seven years old in Ghostbusters Magazine. They claimed it was a real-life proton pack and I wanted to visit so bad.
    • CommentAuthorSolario
    • CommentTimeDec 4th 2007
     (136.3)
    Heh. Supertheory of Supereverything.
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      CommentAuthorturing
    • CommentTimeDec 4th 2007
     (136.4)
    Basically everything on DamnInteresting is, well, damn interesting. I've been resisting going through the archives as I have real work needs doing...
  2.  (136.5)
    With a little work and some paint, that could be the best go-cart track in the history of the universe.
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      CommentAuthorturing
    • CommentTimeDec 4th 2007
     (136.6)
    Seeing the map with the GIANT oval, I have to wonder what would happen if you just filled it with copper and turned the whole thing into a giant electromagnet. Could you pull planes down from the sky?
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      CommentAuthorGypsy
    • CommentTimeDec 4th 2007
     (136.7)
    When I lived in Illinois, every single time ANYONE came to visit, we took them to FermiLab in Batavia, IL. I have to admit, it looks like the place in Texas is far more interesting with its underground tunnels...and I have what can almost be described as a fetish for abandoned buildings, so this is right up my alley. But here is the link to FermiLab where they discovered the Quark and are looking into the discovery of something called a "Top Quark". It is a neat place. It's been nearly 20 years since I was there last. I'd like to go back...I'm sure it's changed some by now.
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      CommentAuthorLuke
    • CommentTimeDec 4th 2007
     (136.8)
    It's always sad to see such an immense project getting killed - I'm just glad I didn't get to see the savaging of the structure, ripping out all the pieces designed for a single awesome goal and flogging them off for minor work. On the other hand, the Higgs boson is interesing but not "billions of dollars we could spend on something else" interesting. We'll get back to those energies, don't you worry about that, but it might take a while.
  3.  (136.9)
    @Luke
    ' On the other hand, the Higgs boson is interesing but not "billions of dollars we could spend on something else" interesting. '

    How true. I know a guy who plays with the big machines like the Supercollider. His doctorate - on the Higgs - consisted of seven or so experimental runs, of which he got one viable result which was 'strongly indicative' of a Higgs boson.
    In other words, millions of dollars and four years of his life equals a PhD in which the data wasn't even enough to draw a line on a graph.