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    •  
      CommentAuthorAlan Tyson
    • CommentTimeDec 4th 2007 edited
     (149.21)
    @: JTraub

    And this is a bad thing? Comics are comics, whether they've got unnaturally-shaped eyebrows and switchblade noses or whatever other style defines the comic. Hell, I slowly hacked my way from Gundam Wing to Ghost in the Shell to Renaissance: Paris 2054 - everybody's gotta start somewhere.
  1.  (149.22)
    Hah no, its a GREAT thing. I just mean they have already been gotten, they just do not want what the US is selling.
    •  
      CommentAuthorAlan Tyson
    • CommentTimeDec 4th 2007
     (149.23)
    Not yet - give them time for the pituitary glands to kick in :) Actually, that's not totally fair, I've got a fair amount of manga still on my shelves.
  2.  (149.24)
    I dunno. surely the more superhero movies and what-not boosts sales of the relevant comics, right?
    •  
      CommentAuthorAlan Tyson
    • CommentTimeDec 4th 2007
     (149.25)
    Probably, although I honest-to-god talked to a kid the other day who had no idea The Punisher started life as a comic.
  3.  (149.26)
    Nope, they do not seem to, but I have a theory on that in the other thread.

    Back on track: what I would love to see if some sort of small publisher digital alliance which provides archival services for subscription and sales to the many publishers who lack major media muscle.

    I mean, I would happily pay $15 a month for a subscription archive to a digital reader of Avatar, Slave Labor, Oni, Top Shelf and many others....

    Edit: I left someone important out. Guess who.....
  4.  (149.27)
    It did? ;P
    •  
      CommentAuthorJohn Smith
    • CommentTimeDec 4th 2007 edited
     (149.28)
    JTraub, you're reading my mind as far as a small publisher alliance. Let them innovate and outshine the big two. They've got the least to lose and most to gain.

    Meanwhile, I'm off to bed tonight. Good discussions, folks. WhiteChapel's looking good.
    •  
      CommentAuthorAlan Tyson
    • CommentTimeDec 4th 2007
     (149.29)
    The danger in that is giving the alliance too much power, and losing the distinct flavors of the individual publishers. I'm not saying it's a bad idea, but it would have to be managed closely.
  5.  (149.30)
    I can't see how it could control their product anymore then Diamond does currently (clearly has its own issues in that area) unless it had influence over publishing choices and schedules.

    I simply mean a situation where the pool with some third party to provide the scanning and distro services.
    •  
      CommentAuthorAlan Tyson
    • CommentTimeDec 4th 2007
     (149.31)
    Well, wouldn't it at least have some influence over the scheduling? Again, I admit ignorance of how Diamond works, so maybe I'm spouting needless caution.
  6.  (149.32)
    Subscriptions to digital archives would be great. If I could get that from all the publishers I currently buy comics from I would save probably 75% of what I spend on comics now.
  7.  (149.33)
    Also, I dunno about a video of a comic. Sometimes I'm a very fast reader and just like to skim through things, other times I linger and take things in and read and reread.

    Quicktime has a setting where you can adjust the playback speed. Speed it up, slow it down. Pause it and navel gaze. Fast forward. Mobile devices all have a pause button.

    Lousy example, but a quicktime video of work in progress of a Black Summer cover I colored. Made from screen captures and slapped together. About 33 images at 1000x800 pixels (higher than dvd quality pixel size).

    WIP movie

    It's only 7 MB - roughly the size of 6 minute mp3. If this had been separate, individual high quality jpgs, about you'd be looking at 26 MB. The original PSD format for the images run to about 68 MB. Fast downloads, small bandwidth, and you could fit tons on portable devices.

    Add in Pan, Zoom and other things you can do with quicktime, and you've got a flexible format that can encompass a great deal more than just static images and facing page curling/flipping effects, and something that can cover computers, PDAs, Zunes, iPods, cellphones, and God knows what else.
  8.  (149.34)
    Does anyone understand the technology behind the Kindle enough to know if color is possible in the short term?

    I think I get that is suspending ink in a electromagnetic field....er sorta right? Having a comics readers that looks like paper would be a big selling point for me.
    •  
      CommentAuthorlamuella
    • CommentTimeDec 4th 2007
     (149.35)
    regarding the DRM thing, it's easier to make people not [i]want[/i] to copy and distribute it than make it tough for them to do it. Keep erecting barriers in the form of DRM and they'll keep finding ways over them. To be blunt, all someone has to do is hit print screen and paste 24 times and most forms of DRM are stymied with content as visual as a comic.

    Instead, the answer is (to my mind) to provide things that a scanner can't replicate. I think subscriber archives might be part of this, but I think you could do a lot more. For example:

    Give digital subscribers access to exclusive Q&A sessions with creators, or the first look at new content. Use them as a sounding board for new ideas and directions to make them feel like part of the process and the community.
    With the cooperation of conventions, give digital subscribers first shot at con tickets before they go on sale to the public, and either give them a discount or give them some kind of special privilege that goes along with it.
    consider giving people a discount on the trade paperback if they bought all the issues of the singles run. If it usually retails for $15, and they've bought all 8 issues of it, send them a printable coupon to get it for $10.

    beyond this, when looking at providing comics in the digital age, it's important to remember that the medium often dictates the content. Comic books are usually 22 page stapled things, and so the type of fiction they have generated is often episodic, in brief and exciting chapters. The kind of comics that have thrived so far on the Internet are daily strips. The question that needs to be asked is if you are trying to move print comics into electronic form, how will the change of medium effect the content? Will comics be able to excape their print beginnings in this way? Considering that webcomics have their niche and form so thoroughly carved out, is there a PLACE for the traditional comic online, as anything more than an alternative for the print version?

    I wrote my master's degree thesis on ebooks back in 2001, when an ebook reader weighed as much as a housebrick and was of similar portability. The point I remember making (derived from several surveys I conducted) as that people like books to be books. The novel works in printed form because that's where it grew up. Fiction in electronic form can't just be the novel ported over. The comic is the same. If all that is done is that print comics are available exactly as they are except scanned, their only advantage will be instant availability and possibly a lower selling price. If they are to thrive rather than simply be a stopgap measure, electronic comic books must change. Into what I'm not sure.
    •  
      CommentAuthorlamuella
    • CommentTimeDec 4th 2007
     (149.36)
    mark: unrelated to this, but that coloring job you did on that cover is absolutely out of this world.
    •  
      CommentAuthorelwood
    • CommentTimeDec 4th 2007
     (149.37)
    One thing regarding the DRM - Notice how many computer books now ship with PDFs of the book on CDs? Used to be they tried to use DRM.

    They learned that it was better to have people share it, as they would more then likely wind up buying the book if they found it useful to them. Net sales increase.

    Know why that does not matter?

    Because of you want to do "comics" in new media, its not comics. People only buy the book because that is the format it was written for. If you do these "new comics" right, they will be made for the new medium and that is the only medium people will want them in.

    I can't help but shake the thought that, you are no longer talking comics when you do this. You are talking a story telling technique using pictures and text combined. But as for the rest, there are no pages, there is no cover, etc etc. Its new. It would have to be written for the medium.
    •  
      CommentAuthorAlan Tyson
    • CommentTimeDec 4th 2007
     (149.38)
    If you're using text and images together to tell a story, it's still sequential art, whatever else you choose to call it. However, I agree that the 22-page story is not necessarily going to hold its place as the apex predator in this new environment.

    But might it still work? It's been proven to in the past. People are used to getting their stories this way. It's an effective length, just like 300-400 pages is an effective length for a fair-sized novel and 1 1/2 - 2 hours is a good length for a film (though we're seeing that changing). And you can do a well-done webcomic in that format - just ask most web-graphic-novel writers.
    •  
      CommentAuthorelwood
    • CommentTimeDec 4th 2007
     (149.39)
    Point I am trying to make is not that it can't be done. Its just it is something new.

    Think of it this way - You won't want to scroll. So, what does that do to "trim size"? Something made to be displayed on a phone is going to be a lot different then a dedicated device.
    •  
      CommentAuthorAlan Tyson
    • CommentTimeDec 4th 2007
     (149.40)
    Something on a phone might display one panel at a time, perhaps - although just the thought of that gives me a headache. It also kills the impact of full-page spreads.

    I personally don't mind scrolling while reading webcomics. Is it really that much of an issue?