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  1.  (1606.81)
    warren, if you were to wake up tomorrow and find your self as the EIC of Marvel (would that be a BIG stretch?) who would be your choice as the new creative team on The Thunderbolts?

    just curious...
  2.  (1606.82)
    No opinion, sorry. And my even considering that in public would do a serious disservice to the new writer, Christos Gage.
  3.  (1606.83)
    I actually fell off of the Thunderbolts book shortly after your takeover. Mostly due to the loss of work, and lack of funds. Damn shame really, as I always liked the book (except when it was all "Fight Club-esque." I hope it doesn't wind up being canceled, I'd like to jump back on, even though Warren's no longer going to be writing it. But then, I also wish DOOM 2099 was still around, but who gets what they wish?
    •  
      CommentAuthorDerleth
    • CommentTimeMar 31st 2008
     (1606.84)
    Oddly enough, my personal favorite WTH work of your was RUINS. I will never get the partially disemboweled Kitty Pride out of my skull.
  4.  (1606.85)
    No opinion, sorry. And my even considering that in public would do a serious disservice to the new writer, Christos Gage.


    okay, how about we change up the question a bit. If you woke up as EIC of WildStorm, who would you want to work on The Authority?
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      CommentAuthortedcroland
    • CommentTimeMar 31st 2008
     (1606.86)
    okay, how about we change up the question a bit. If you woke up as EIC of WildStorm, who would you want to work on The Authority?

    I believe that the response to this will be akin to the first one, especially since Christos Gage is also writing that book. Not to mention the fact that Darick Robertson is penciling it.
    • CommentAuthorMalifer
    • CommentTimeMar 31st 2008
     (1606.87)
    Ellis,

    You mentioned getting readers from UFF to Transmet. I thought I would share how I started following your work. I'm sure I had read DV8, Age of Apoc, maybe some the DOOM 2099 stuff but I wasn't paying attention to whom was making the books (I was young), but I was joining the Scifi Book Club for the second or third time and they had started giving the first two Transmet trades as a selection and "I figured what the hell, people said it was good I'll give a shot".

    I was hooked went comic store subscribed to Transmet around issue thirty something and I have been looking forward your books ever since. sfbc got you at least one fan.

    I actually prefer shorter stints for writers. I think you get more concise stronger stories. I remember in the 80s and maybe early 90s there was one guy who had written Captain America for like 10 years or something and at first the were good stories but in the end I distinctly remember one where Cap turns into a werewolf and another one where Capt got cancer and dressed like Super-Pro. Less than the man best, but hell after cranking out tens years of stories for one character it was bound to happen.

    Speaking of Super-pro that is a comic book character I dare any writer to make cool. lol
  5.  (1606.88)
    I haven’t read a superhero book in at least a year. I can’t say that I miss them much: trying to keep track of the Marvel universe over the last two decades just took too much effort.

    But when I was a kid, there were some really terrible books out there. It’s good to see that so many of the really great comic writers are doing the superhero books along with their own stuff. It gives me hope that at some point I’ll have kids who read comics, and there will be some really great writing there for them.
  6.  (1606.89)
    Just to be awkward I went the other way.

    I was very much a Vertigo (and similar) only person until fairly recently.... Then names like Warren Ellis, Neil Gaiman, Mike Carey and Grant Morrison got me picking up the pervert-suit comics as well, and while I will probably never rate X-Men, UFF, etc as being anywhere near as good as Transmet, Desolation Jones, Doktor Sleepless, etc, they can still be great fun if they have the right writer.
    • CommentAuthorepalicki
    • CommentTimeMar 31st 2008
     (1606.90)
    I read the announcement over on Newsarama and then made the mistake of looking over the talk-back comments.

    Man, between this and the Superman copyright thread, comics has actually succeeded in making me dumber today.
  7.  (1606.91)
    I believe that the response to this will be akin to the first one, especially since Christos Gage is also writing that book. Not to mention the fact that Darick Robertson is penciling it.


    actually he isn't anymore. the miniseries he was doing is done now, so the question is rather appropriate if there hasn't been another writer picked for whatever is to come next for the authority
    • CommentAuthorJim Moore
    • CommentTimeMar 31st 2008
     (1606.92)
    Judging by the email I was getting, some people weren't understanding.



    These must be, for the most part, the new readers you are attracting, so I would think that it's a positive, at least in terms of audience not knowing your MO.

    Hopefully this translates into good sales on your Avatar novellas.
    •  
      CommentAuthorpromethian
    • CommentTimeMar 31st 2008 edited
     (1606.93)
    The second really odd thing came in some months later. Sales of TRANSMET TPBs spiked massively. And the only thing that had changed was that I was writing UFF. What had happened was that these new readers had liked UFF, gone looking for other stuff by me, found nothing in their local store, gone to Amazon or bookstores, and picked up TRANSMET books. A few months later, I saw numbers on all my other creator-owned TPBs pick up too.

    And now we can sell more than 12,000 copies of CRECY in a matter of months.


    So Warren, translation... if you work in WFH for a while it gets all the new readers interested in your creator-owned/ independent/ superhero & non-superhero stuff... then that sells books and benefits you financially and allows you to do purely creator-owned work for a while... until it is time to introduce a new crop of (up to this point) superhero comics readers to your body of work... mission accomplished, you go back to WFH for a while... and the cycle continues... ? Sounds like an awesome system you got going on.
    •  
      CommentAuthorpromethian
    • CommentTimeMar 31st 2008
     (1606.94)
    Warren, I must say that my interest in comics has waxed and waned a lot over the years, but your writing has constantly refreshed my interest in them. I remember reading an issue of Doom 2099 where the characters were discussing the lesser and greater eyes of Agamotto. Wow! Seeing the Asgardian Enchantress in opera gloves and thigh-high stockings with Thor. Wow! Doctor Strange returning from the war of the seven spheres with a giant alien flea in his clothes! Wow! these wow moments stuck out in my mind and I didn't even realize you wrote them all until I finally figured out who you were once I started reading Planetery. Which brings us to the total bad-assery and consummate villany of the Thunderbolts, and the way you make the reader care about unknown C-list characters like American Eagle. Wow! Even when you only write in WFH for a short run, you constantly reinvorgate WFH comics with originality and quality.

    I have seen a lot of praise for your Transmet series in this thread, but I gotta say that for me your creator-owned wildstorm series "Planetary" wasn't merely my favorite Ellis comic, but is actually my fave series of all time. And I know from following the Wildstorm message board for a while that it was the favorite series of quite a few readers. I don't read superhero stuff much anymore so the fact that you are gonna do a lot more creator owned stuff is fine in my books.

    Whatever you do will be interesting or awesome!
    •  
      CommentAuthorpromethian
    • CommentTimeMar 31st 2008
     (1606.95)
    PS one more thing: I love the way you portray villains, you write them as kick-ass bad. some writers take classic villains, do stuff like make them disproportionally old relative to the main protagonist, sick, dying, or mentally incapacitated and seeking a wierd combination of revenge, redemption and death at the hands of their main hero. Or else the villain has a ton of potential but gets his ass-kicked in 5 seconds by the hero. I really don't like this style of writing because I feel it always demeans the character of the villain, and completely squanders their potential. And I am constantly pleased when I read your stories, because I never see that happen. Your villains are loaded for bear, 110% dedicated to whatever their twisted cause is (whether they are merely misguided, mentally ill, or straight up bad), and if they are shot down (ripped in half, dropped from miles above) they go out in flames with a giant metaphoric 'F-you world'.

    Example: in Thunderbolts, you totally resucitated the character of Mac Gargan, formerly the Spider-man villain the Scorpion. He was a great villain back in the classic Lee-Romita era of spiderman, but treated like a total loser who gets his ass kicked without a please or thank you by recent spiderman writers in the last decade. under your pen he is a once again a powerhouse, this time of brain chomping evilness. you have restored his dignity in villany! That is totally the way he should be written. thanks man!
  8.  (1606.96)
    I can't believe this is two pages.
  9.  (1606.97)
    I can't believe this is two pages.

    It's been one of those days. 501 messages posted in the last 24hrs... that's like 33% of the old WEF message velocity, and that place was huge and had three or four years under its belt at that point.
    • CommentAuthorchris g
    • CommentTimeMar 31st 2008
     (1606.98)
    Hee-hee, you should see the newsarama posts about this (not really).
  10.  (1606.99)
    I can live without seeing what, or if, they think.
    •  
      CommentAuthorseanarcher
    • CommentTimeMar 31st 2008
     (1606.100)
    So, just because I know I can't be the only one piqued by a few of your comments in the thread, what are the odds of you and Derrick actually finding yourselves wanting to revisit Transmet?