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  1.  (1719.41)
    does your fancy diet mean there will be no more cupcakes at your house this year?
    • CommentAuthorbsearles
    • CommentTimeApr 8th 2008
     (1719.42)
    Hi Ed,

    Thanks to my love of your work on Sleeper, Criminal, Daredevil, and Gotham Central, I've finally followed you over to Captain America. So my very mundane question is: Any word on when the first Death of Captain America paperback collection is due out? I've picked up all your Cap books, but a tight budget has me sticking to tpbs. I figured it might be out when the second volume hardcover arrives in May, but haven't seem any scheduling info on it yet...

    best from Boston,

    -Brad

    www.bradleysalmanac.com
    • CommentAuthordkb
    • CommentTimeApr 8th 2008
     (1719.43)
    You've done books with Rucka and Fraction, how about something with W.E.? Take some stellar crime noir and sprinkle in some Godzilla fetishists and saline injection, you may as well line them up for the movie rights.

    In all seriousness, one of my favorite books of yours was Deadenders. I was sad to see it go so soon. While I haven't read everything you've done, I've read a good deal, and (aside from X-men) Deadenders seems the biggest diversion from everything else. The book most unlike the others. Any plans, short or long-term, to do another book like that?
  2.  (1719.44)
    Angel Heart actually holds up really well. I watched it a few years back. It might be Alan Parker's best film. Just as Invasion of the Body Snatchers is Philip Kaufman's best movie, because it's his least pretentious, and it's fucking amazingly filmed.

    >>I was wondering if you could tell us a little about working with Sean Phillips--what kind of material do you give him to work with, and how tightly do you script things for him to draw? I am especially struck by the "black-out" panels above, and I wonder how you two split the visual work of writing?

    I've been writing for Sean for so long now that it's really simple for us. I trust him and Lark and Epting to do anything I write because we've done so many comics together. There are other collaborators I like working with, but those three are like my own hands, in some way. They always draw it how I pictured or better, for the most part.

    Here's a script page for an upcoming issue:

    1—1972. A 60s style big car drives down a long highway in the late afternoon. It’s like highway 5 in California. Emptiness, but mountains in the distance. It’s a four lane highway, two lanes on each side, and there’s a smattering of cars on it, but we focus on this one.

    NARR: Two hundred miles from home, I’m pretty sure this guy’s going to be trouble.

    NARR: Trouble I can handle, but trouble.

    2—Inside the car, we see the driver, a chubby nervous white guy with glasses, balding. He’s looking over at us, and we’re in the perspective of the passenger seat. He’s got a nervous smile, sweating a little. He’s like a travelling salesman or something.

    NARR: Figured him for the nervous type, the hopeful type…

    3—And now we see Danica in the passenger seat. She looks tired, but she’s smoking and she’s got her window down, and her legs crossed, so she’s showing some leg to the driver, and trying to ignore him looking at her. She’s got a small purse (big enough for a gun, though) on her lap. She’s looking out the window, and wearing her little fur jacket that she got killed in last issue.

    NARR: Kind you show a little leg, and shake a little ass, and they do whatever you want.

    4—Now the driver’s hand reaches over and touches her leg, where it’s exposed.

    NARR: But a few hours into the ride, and he’s growing his balls back.

    5—She looks at him, exhaling smoke. He laughs, nervously, taking his hand away.

    GUY: Henhh… hehh…?

    6—She looks away, flicking her cigarette out the window.

    DANICA: Stop up ahead, would ya?
    DANICA: I need to use the ladies room.

    And here's how Sean drew it:

    pagefrom3
  3.  (1719.45)
    would like to beg plead and cry for more in the style of DEADENDERS!! book is amazing.
  4.  (1719.46)
    Sean's inking is leaning toward a slight Munoz vibe lately, with those big swathes of black.
  5.  (1719.47)
    Thank you Ariana.
    •  
      CommentAuthorgroonk
    • CommentTimeApr 8th 2008
     (1719.48)
    >>Also, if you haven't seen Criminal at your local store ever, please ask them to carry it for you, and maybe remind them that I write other big books that do well for them, like Captain America.<<

    consider it done. i've been meaning to catch up on the new Iron Fist. i remember getting the Kun Lun story in one of those random comics things that Sears or somebody sold via their catalogs. this was back in the day.

    The recent goings on with Cap caught my eye as well. i'll have to backtrack on those issues, i guess.

    and that interview with Bill Hader: hilarious and informative.
    •  
      CommentAuthorJon Wake
    • CommentTimeApr 8th 2008
     (1719.49)
    Howyadoin'?

    So this is one I ask everyone I meet.
    How many years did you work until you felt you'd 'made it'?

    I mean 'made it' in the sense that you felt comfortable throwing out the resume that listed "customer service" as a skill.
  6.  (1719.50)
    I'm curious if there's any music (song/artist/genre/theme song) that you associate with specific titles or characters you write. I'm most curious about 'Criminal,' since it's closest to the 'real' world, but this applies to the superhero books, too. Is there anything special you listen while writing, to or imagine being on in the background of certain scenes?

    Not so much. I was thinking Leonard Cohen for certain parts of Coward, I think, but mostly I just listen to stuff that's sort of depressing and slow while I write, if I listen to anything at all. Stuff like Will Oldham or Sun Kil Moon's album of all Modest Mouse songs. I can't listen to anything too rambunctious and think straight enough to write.

    Also, if I get two questions -- the TV show "Homicide" was obviously a big influence on you and Greg in 'Gotham Central.' Do you have a favorite character/episode/storyline -- or just something in the show that spoke to you?

    I think we both loved Pembleton. Yeah, Gotham Central was so much our version of Homicide it was almost theft, but not quite. Originality is highly overrated, anyway.
  7.  (1719.51)
    hello Mr. Brubaker and welcome
    • CommentAuthorhkhenson
    • CommentTimeApr 8th 2008
     (1719.52)
    Heavy stuff you do.

    I think there is an opportunity to expand the market for graphic material beyond the current base.

    Transmetropolitan did that. I had not read anything in the graphic class since the underground comics dried up, but it was widely recommended in transhumanist circles. Of course that's not a very large community either.

    There is one other area that might be fun and profitable to take on, but due to legal restrictions I can't mention it in a public forum that might be read by a certain class of people. Ask in private if you wish. This community is larger, perhaps 100,000 strong, and smack in comics prime demographic.

    Keith Henson
    hkhenson(at)rogers.com
  8.  (1719.53)
    might be read by a certain class of people


    i dont know what you are alluding to, but this strikes me as fucking hilarious.
    i am always glad to be considered part of that class of people....
    •  
      CommentAuthorZ
    • CommentTimeApr 8th 2008
     (1719.54)
    <blockquote>I can't listen to anything too rambunctious and think straight enough to write. </blockquote>
    Is there work you can do while listening to more up-tempo music (like editing, or drafts of things), or is that music reserved especially for car/home? What music do you listen to 'away from the office'?

    - Z
    •  
      CommentAuthorPete
    • CommentTimeApr 8th 2008
     (1719.55)
    Ed, SLEEPER is a big favorite of mine and I'm crazy for both IRON FIST and CRIMINAL. Thank you for the excellent stuff to read, and keep up the great work.
    •  
      CommentAuthornigredo
    • CommentTimeApr 8th 2008
     (1719.56)
    Hey, Ed.

    Criminal is one of my favourite books and I think one of the best books out there in quite a while. I love that you have paid a lot of attention to the overall package, from the covers to the fonts to the essays at the end. The experience of reading Criminal would be entirely different if it weren't for that.

    Thanks for introducing me to some interesting writers by the way.
  9.  (1719.57)
    Damn. Lost a whole post. Fucking internet.

    Here's some of Sean's process, from his blog: http://surebeatsworking.blogspot.com/

    cover rough:

    rough

    inks:

    inks

    and painted and designed with temp text:

    final
    •  
      CommentAuthorEd Brubaker
    • CommentTimeApr 8th 2008 edited
     (1719.58)


    And here's that interview. It gets funny halfway through, or... at least I fucking hope it does.
  10.  (1719.59)
    Hey Ed

    You did an interview in a jail cell a few months ago for a tv series and I want say thanks (I was the editor, so we never met, but it was a great interview).

    I'm Seconding Jacob Horn's question about working with Sean Phillips. I recall a review of Criminal that drew attention to the "camera" angles you guys use. Is that something specifically in the script or is it generally left for Sean to interpret?
  11.  (1719.60)
    Sigh... I just picture Ariana running around after me fixing all the plumbing I'm destroying.