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    • CommentAuthorbecky c
    • CommentTimeApr 9th 2008
     (1719.121)
    Hello Ed,

    I muchly enjoyed your revamping of Catwoman a few years back. Are you ever going to work on that series again? I know it's been a while since then, so I'm guessing I already know the answer.

    Thanks for telling good stories.
    • CommentAuthorFlabyo
    • CommentTimeApr 9th 2008
     (1719.122)
    Just thought I'd say that you and Matt's run on Iron Fist is what switched me back to buying single issues instead of just trades. Waiting more than a month for more of the tournament just wasn't an option.
    •  
      CommentAuthorAdlai
    • CommentTimeApr 9th 2008
     (1719.123)
    Hey Ed, thanks for appearing on Whitechapel!

    I know you've probably answered this before but what was Marvel's reaction when you said that you wanted to bring Bucky back from the dead?

    And what drew you to Uncanny? The majority of your work is based on more "street-level" characters, so this was a pretty big departure from that.
  1.  (1719.124)
    Welcome to Whitechapel, Ed!

    Re crime novels; have you read any of Lee Childs' novels, all centered around the wandering, lone, hard-ass Jack Reacher? Howard Chaykin recommended them to me at a con a few years back and they're almost uniformally great, IMHO.

    Loving Criminal and Daredevil, which are the only books from Marvel I don't trade wait for. (I'd be tempted to do the same for Cap, but Marvel went ahead and released that glorious Omnibus, which settled that format issue!)
  2.  (1719.125)
    Hey Ed
    Did you find it slightly daunting at first when you were given Captain America to write?
    •  
      CommentAuthorAndre
    • CommentTimeApr 9th 2008
     (1719.126)
    Hi Ed

    First off I'm a huge fan of your work, I've only recently disovered alot of your writings but am looking forward to looking up all the things I've missed. I currently read Captain America and Daredevil and got ahold of the first issue of the new criminal series.

    1) Any plans to reinvigorate any other old DD villains, the work you've done to Mr. Fear was impeccable. If so which ones might we keep an eye out for.

    2) Whats your favorite works by other creators such as Warren Ellis, Grant Morrison, Alan Moore and Garth Ennis?

    3) I've read secret Invasion isn't going to effect the daredevil title but what about Captain America? I know questions like
    is steve returning (I hope not) and what not won't get an answer so a broad response is fine.

    4) Would you collarborate with any other creators beside Fraction in the near future and if so who would you like to work with.

    and finnally
    5) if there was an Ed brubaker action figure what would the accesories be?

    Thanks Ed, your one of the greats and a gem to but up with all this White Chapel nonsense...kudos....
  3.  (1719.127)
    5) if there was an Ed brubaker action figure what would the accesories be?

    If he answers this I'm going to have you killed, Andre.
    •  
      CommentAuthorZ
    • CommentTimeApr 9th 2008
     (1719.128)
    You do realise people are now going to speculate about the accessories for the Ellis action figure. Talk of canes and hats and removable beards and whatnot.

    If Ed's action figure speculation would be grounds for death, I wonder what the consequences would be of photoshopping your likeness into molded plastic form.

    I'm so glad I don't have PhotoShop.

    * * *

    Mr Brubaker:

    I've just picked up <em>Lawless</em>, having previously read <em>Criminal</em>. Is there an order to the books I should be looking for (such as volume numbers), or do the individual books stand alone?

    Thanks.

    - Z
  4.  (1719.129)
    As much as I love Lark, any plans to do an arc or story with the great Gene Colan?

    I would love that, but I hear that Gene is retiring after he finishes the Captain America annual he's been drawing for over a year now. That looks great, though.


    As someone who's made some drastic changes to some of comics biggest icons, how do you balance the respect for what's come before you with the opportunity to tell your own story and make your own mark?

    I think it's really selfish, honestly. You hold onto the stuff that came before that you personally liked or found interesting. The rest just falls into place around that. For my part I've been lucky in that I'm working on characters that I really liked the basic foundations of and was a fan of several popular runs on them, so I like parts of the characters and their worlds that resonate with the readership, apparently. On Catwoman, I pretty much threw out everything after Batman Year One.

    That said, it's important to find that key thing about any long-standing character before you write them, and to read what came before as much as you can. I think as long as you don't outright violate past continuity, you can take the readers with you down almost any path, if you're involved enough in your own story.

    hey, did you know that your name is now used as comic shop rhyming slang for making a cup of tea?

    No. But I think that must mean I've made it.

    is that guy at the end of the last issue of cap a the same bloke who died in the fire that "killed" sharon carter?

    You'll find out next issue who that is.

    I know you've probably answered this before but what was Marvel's reaction when you said that you wanted to bring Bucky back from the dead?

    In my first talk with Joe, he and I both brought up bringing back Bucky, so it was never any fight. Or it was a fight they'd had before I got there, at least. Then I had to talk Tom Brevoort into it, I was told if I could convince Tom, I could convince the readers, basically. So I talked to Tom and he gave me a list of questions that he felt needed to be answered for a Bucky return to work. Those questions helped me take my initial ideas and make them even better, and helped form the story of the Winter Soldier and his life since WW2. There's one whole issue of Cap that's all the Winter Soldier files, and that's all directly from my response to Tom's questions. So, if anyone wants to know, that's what a good editor does. He gets the writer to think.

    And what drew you to Uncanny? The majority of your work is based on more "street-level" characters, so this was a pretty big departure from that.

    Well, I try to keep the tone of my work different from project to project, to some degree, at least. And I had done a superhero team before, the Authority. I see my books like this - Cap America is espionage, DD is pulp fiction, X-Men is superhero romance, and Criminal is... well, crime stories.

    The main reason I took the first gig, though -- Deadly Genesis -- was because it was a big deal Marvel project going back to the debut of the modern X-Men in Giant Size #1. That was my first really high-profile gig, in some ways. From then, they kept offering me more X-Men work, and I was having fun so I stayed around. I will admit, though, that I think I'm finally in my wheelhouse on X-Men after Messiah Complex. The current story and the stuff Matt and I have planned for the next year are going to be a lot of fun.

    Re crime novels; have you read any of Lee Childs' novels, all centered around the wandering, lone, hard-ass Jack Reacher? Howard Chaykin recommended them to me at a con a few years back

    Yeah, Chaykin turned me onto Lee Child, too. I love those books. Tracy Lawless is a bit of a response to Reacher, actually, but not exactly.
  5.  (1719.130)
    Did you find it slightly daunting at first when you were given Captain America to write?

    No. I was too caught up in writing something new.

    1) Any plans to reinvigorate any other old DD villains, the work you've done to Mr. Fear was impeccable. If so which ones might we keep an eye out for.

    Maybe in a way, yeah.

    2) Whats your favorite works by other creators such as Warren Ellis, Grant Morrison, Alan Moore and Garth Ennis?

    My favorite Ellis books are Planetary and Fell, probably. Morrison would probably be the Invisibles. Alan Moore it's V for Vendetta and From Hell. Garth Ennis... probably his Punisher MAX series, honestly.

    3) I've read secret Invasion isn't going to effect the daredevil title but what about Captain America? I know questions like
    is steve returning (I hope not) and what not won't get an answer so a broad response is fine.


    No. I'm in the midst of a huge storyline, so I'm not interacting with Secret Invasion in Cap. I believe you may see the New Cap in Secret Invasion at some point, though.

    4) Would you collaborate with any other creators beside Fraction in the near future and if so who would you like to work with.

    Probably not. The co-writing deals I've done have been pretty unique situations. Mostly, we writers prefer to work alone.

    5) if there was an Ed brubaker action figure what would the accessories be?

    Glasses, a brown fedora, a switchblade, a bong, and a leather g-string.

    I've just picked up Lawless, having previously read Criminal. Is there an order to the books I should be looking for (such as volume numbers), or do the individual books stand alone?

    You can read them in any order. All the Criminal books stand on their own. That said, if you read Coward before Lawless, you get a few Easter Eggs in Lawless, basically. The main plan for Criminal was that each book would be completely new-reader friendly. If you're going to do crime comics, we figured, you need to keep them uncluttered for new eyes.
    •  
      CommentAuthorAndre
    • CommentTimeApr 9th 2008
     (1719.131)
    Haha sorry warren I'm a sucker for a goofy question. I heard it on some interview show one time and laughed
    so hard I think it blew my sanity.
    •  
      CommentAuthorZ
    • CommentTimeApr 9th 2008
     (1719.132)
    Are there any artists in particular you've wanted to work with that you haven't yet?

    If this question has already been asked, sorry about that.
  6.  (1719.133)
    Glasses, a brown fedora, a switchblade, a bong, and a leather g-string.

    You just wait. The custom figure will show up on ebay.
    • CommentAuthorMidweeker
    • CommentTimeApr 9th 2008
     (1719.134)
    Hi Ed,
    I've been a fan for a while, going back to your Aeon books. I used to work at Gosh! in London, and we kept your books in permanent stock, alongside the likes of Clowes, Bagge and Los Bros Hernandez.
    My questions are:
    1. What was your aim in the industry back then, were you always interested in doing books for the bigger companies, or were you a commited "indie guy"?
    2. Were you disappointed that the likes of D&Q and Fantagraphics didn't publish you back then?
    3. What would the you of those days think of you now?
    I would like to state now that I like both types of "you", btw. Whilst I miss the stuff you drew as well, I love what you've done across the big books, Sleeper, DD & Crminal especially.
    Just as a little postscript, are we gonna see anything on Charles Willeford or Frederic Brown in Criminal? I know Willeford's been mentioned, but he definitely deserves a full article!
  7.  (1719.135)
    Ed:

    I love your stuff, going back to Lowlife. Is there a market for more crime/noir comics? I adore Criminal, and I'm thoroughly enjoying drawing a short crime story for an upcoming Image Pop Gun. If there were more avenues for this stuff, I might get back into comics on a regular basis.
  8.  (1719.136)
    Are there any artists in particular you've wanted to work with that you haven't yet?

    Yeah, a lot of them. John Cassaday, Boucq, Jordi Bernet, Eduardo Risso, David Lloyd, Dave Gibbons, Klaus Janson, Mike Mignola, Art Adams, Cully Hamner... the list goes on.

    1. What was your aim in the industry back then, were you always interested in doing books for the bigger companies, or were you a committed "indie guy"?

    It was a slow evolution. I always wrote stories for other people to draw, even when I was doing Lowlife, I did Accidental Death with Eric Shanower when I was working on issue 2 of Lowlife, and did some other stories that were more crime and fictional even before I sold Scene of the Crime to Vertigo.

    Once I was making a living writing, I started getting asked if I'd like to write Batman or Catwoman, and so I started reading superhero comics again and seeing what they were like then (this was 1998 and I hadn't really followed mainstream comics for a long time). I saw what some people were doing - guys like Rucka and Warren and Morrison, and I thought, what the hell, I'll try it.

    2. Were you disappointed that the likes of D&Q and Fantagraphics didn't publish you back then?

    I remember feeling bitter about Kim Thompson and his reactions to my work, especially the condescending tone of his correspondence, but I wasn't that great a cartoonist so I'm not surprised that D and Q didn't publish me, really. Anyway, I was in my 20s, and being bitter is part of what that's about, right? I barely ever think about those days, honestly.

    3. What would the you of those days think of you now?

    I think the 'me' of those days was never quite as big a genre snob as a lot of other alternative cartoonists were and are. I always read crime and sci-fi novels and dug Jim Thompson more than Bukowski. So, I'd imagine the me of back then would probably ask me to borrow money and I'd tell him to get a fucking job.
  9.  (1719.137)
    Hello Mister Brubaker

    Well, first of all i'll say that i didn't read all the questions and anwsers along the discussion, so excuse me if i'm being repetitive...

    REST OF POST DELETED BY WARREN BECAUSE YOU'RE A LAZY IDIOT
  10.  (1719.138)
    Ed, what Martial arts films would you recommend, be they samurai, epic or other. I'm in the mood to watch movies with beautiful cinematography of some people being kicked in the face and I'm asking around.
  11.  (1719.139)
    Ed:

    If someone were to ask you to recommend them some books (or movies, TV shows, whatever), what would be the first few you would give them?
  12.  (1719.140)
    iron fist wasn't really on my radar before reading your stint...any other collected iron fist stuff you can recommend?