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    • CommentAuthorRenThing
    • CommentTimeApr 21st 2008
     (1885.1)
    From Drudge Report and Times Online: Surgeons give hope to blind with successful 'bionic eye' operations.

    Think we'll start seeing artificial eyes with better than human vision in the next twenty years?
    • CommentAuthorOddcult
    • CommentTimeApr 21st 2008
     (1885.2)
    If they can crack the tech that sends an optical signal to the brain properly, it'll be possible to make better than usual human vision straight away.
    • CommentAuthorRenThing
    • CommentTimeApr 21st 2008
     (1885.3)
    What do you think the likelihood of doctor's offices starting to offer these sorts of implants, once they improve them, to people as a means of body mods?
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      CommentAuthorcurb
    • CommentTimeApr 21st 2008
     (1885.4)
    Considering that the optician used such a hushed, 'announcing a death' tone of voice to describe the state of my left eye as 'something I'll have to contend with in later life', this comes as very good news to me. Although it does thwart my plan to wear an eye patch.
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      CommentAuthortedcroland
    • CommentTimeApr 21st 2008
     (1885.5)
    Although it does thwart my plan to wear an eye patch.


    Why? You could do that now if you wanted.
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      CommentAuthorcurb
    • CommentTimeApr 21st 2008
     (1885.6)
    S'true - I think the real issue is me feeling the need for a decent excuse to wear one.
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      CommentAuthorAlan Tyson
    • CommentTimeApr 21st 2008
     (1885.7)
    @ Renthing

    I think it will be a long time before most people willingly give up their eyes for these, though I personally would be in line for them. The difference between this and, say, Lasick surgery, is that Lasick just fixes a problem with the eyes, rather than trading the eye in for something else. People don't like replacing perfectly good body parts if they don't have to. As a result, there won't be much of a market for it, and doctor's won't likely offer it, constricting any existing market.
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      CommentAuthorUnsub
    • CommentTimeApr 21st 2008
     (1885.8)
    I'm having a time out until I can learn some manners.
    As soon as I read that I thought of the eye implants all the Rangers had in Ghost in the Shell. Instead of a scope on a rifle it would only need a small laser pointer that could work with the optics in your head. Maybe Darpa will throw a couple billion at it. It will be that or soldiers gentically modified from conception to have eagles eyes. Cyborg versus mutant snipers.
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      CommentAuthorAlan Tyson
    • CommentTimeApr 21st 2008
     (1885.9)
    See, I still don't think that overlaying one's vision with a sniper scope would be all that effective - it'd be disorienting as hell, for one. Now matter how much meat you replace, the human mind is gonna work a certain way.
  1.  (1885.10)
    @Artemis:
    Neural plasticity is an amazing thing... when a sense is lost or damaged, the parts of the brain responsible (say the visual cortex if you lose an eye) adapt, often taking on more work from other senses. I don't see why a brain couldn't adapt to sniper implants or other visual hacks.
    Whether the mind of the user could is another matter... but I suspect a regime of FPS games during rehab would help!
  2.  (1885.11)
    I believe these will start taking the place of stuff like Lasick after the bar is brought up in general.. what is currently advancement will just be viewed as therapy eventually.
    • CommentAuthorKosmopolit
    • CommentTimeApr 25th 2008 edited
     (1885.12)
    I'm wondering if you could implant the electrodes without destroying your normal sight.

    That way you could have your sniper scope or whatever as options and bring them up as required.

    Another interesting use wold be to have Google Earth 3D maps with real-time satellite data and have the virtual equivalent of x-ray vision. "Show me what's on the other side of that wall."

    Or how about face recognition software that overlaid names and other info on people in real time? Great for people like me who are lousy at remembering names.

    Of course, thanks to the wireless link from the camera to the optic nerve, users can look forward to having the vision data feed hacked. And eye-spam.

    It occurs to me too that you could record and play back the signal later.

    It's almost enough to make me wish I had a serious degenerative disease threatening my sight.
    • CommentAuthorPablo
    • CommentTimeApr 25th 2008
     (1885.13)
    This is interesting to me, having lived with just the one eye pretty much my entire life.
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      CommentAuthorrickiep00h
    • CommentTimeApr 25th 2008
     (1885.14)
    @Kosmopolit

    You get a cookie for the day. Mr. Visionary here.
  3.  (1885.15)
    @Kosmopolit
    It's almost enough to make me wish I had a serious degenerative disease threatening my sight.

    It makes me wish I could find a Doktor to install it, regardless of whether or not I had the disease.
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      CommentAuthorm1k3y
    • CommentTimeApr 25th 2008
     (1885.16)
    oh this is very cool! I'm gonna break form and make a Star Trek ref: having that guy's eyes that can see all spectrums would be wicked! Re: Lasik - as i blogged on Grinding, this can already give you 'better than perfect' vision.
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      CommentAuthorAlan Tyson
    • CommentTimeApr 25th 2008
     (1885.17)
    Eye spam...I think that term needs to be used in a story. If you don't mind, of course, Kosmo.
    • CommentAuthorKosmopolit
    • CommentTimeApr 25th 2008
     (1885.18)
    Artemis - go for it.
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      CommentAuthorAlan Tyson
    • CommentTimeApr 25th 2008 edited
     (1885.19)
    Thanks. If I do end up using it, I'll be sure to credit your internet self - which would be very fitting, I guess.
  4.  (1885.20)
    @Spiraltwist

    This is one of my fascinations with the legal system - elective surgery that isn't socially acceptable. People who feel that they're actually amputees and go through the process to remove the limb that they don't feel is theirs. The twins featured in BME years ago that transfered one's entire arm to the other as a body mod. Etc. Doctors lose their licenses over such things.
    The world is an odd, odd place. But AWESOME.