Not signed in (Sign In)
  1.  (1912.1)
    Welcome to the Age of Never Being Alone or Particularly Private.
    Does it qualify as Sub-Augmented Reality insofar as the app is conscious of where you are?
    Twinkle
    Interesting concept.
    •  
      CommentAuthororwellseyes
    • CommentTimeApr 22nd 2008 edited
     (1912.2)
    I smell SPIME.

    Got into a whole huge conversation about twitter at work. One of our designers twiters (thus, is he a twit?) all day long. We all know about it, somewhat amusing stream of consciousness

    "COFFEE...NEEED....COFFEEE"
    "HAVE COFFEE NOW. LIFE CONTINUES"
    "Worried about addiction to coffee"
    "Running low on coffee"

    But I'm a couple years older than him and find the notion of constant updates of my person/location/activities Orwellian. Self-imposed Orwellian, which is almost more disturbing.
  2.  (1912.3)
    Not a spime.
    •  
      CommentAuthorMonk.Eastman
    • CommentTimeApr 22nd 2008 edited
     (1912.4)
    ellis
    Agreed. Not sure how to qualify it. Elements of augmented reality, insofar as it reacts to realspace position in netspace, but unsure otherwise how to classify.
    orwellseyes
    ...constant updates of my person/location/activities Orwellian

    Don't know if I agree with that. It's a closed circuit if you want it to be: keep only friends/family apprised. Theoretically, that is one of the propositions of 2.0 webbery.
  3.  (1912.5)
    I consider any step that further connects your information cloud / tech gadgets / what have you with your "actual" location another step towards augmented reality. The issue is where you say "we now have augmented reality." It's all grey, and being in the midst of it makes it even more difficult to realize where we are at.


    Speaking of coffee..
  4.  (1912.6)
    Willow
    Interesting. Augmented reality as an ongoing process vs. absolute station...?
  5.  (1912.7)
    Not a spime.

    Of course, I meant it's inching closer and closer. Next step is giving the thing the ability to update itself on twitter, broadcasting GPS, transaction, music and internet surf data automatically. All that data is being saved in the iphone already, just pump it out there on automatic. The human ticker.

    Don't know if I agree with that. It's a closed circuit if you want it to be: keep only friends/family apprised. Theoretically, that is one of the propositions of 2.0 webbery.

    I just don't know why even the closest of friends would give a fuck? Reading Ellis' twitterstream (uncomfortable mental image) is curious, a content line.

    I'm curmudgeonly though. I only begrudgingly got SMS up and running because the girlfriend has twitchy thumbs for it.
    •  
      CommentAuthorMonk.Eastman
    • CommentTimeApr 22nd 2008 edited
     (1912.8)
    orwell
    There is a generation just behind me that lives convergently, meaning very little distinction between webtime and realtime. MySpace is no different than calling or txting or meeting on the corner or catching a cab or riding the train. It's all equally valid. I'm an old man, and split hairs over these things, but the under-thirty set are less discriminating, and the under twenties don't even know the difference. Life is all content. The boundaries stop meaning anything.
  6.  (1912.9)
    The boundaries stop meaning anything.

    I find this horrifying. I'm under 30 and I try to keep my footprint pretty narrow. I just wonder if the culture is going to catch up to this generational shift. Someone posting tweets to an open stream can be found pretty easily.

    I vetted an employee for our firm recently and found her myspace (off her professional e-mail...not good) which was loaded with pictures of her getting shit-faced with friends and content about her and her friend's sex lives. I didn't recommend her, mainly because her digital breadcrumb trail was as wide as a highway, which did not speak to her common sense.

    Dumping that much data onto the open net feels like getting a neck tattoo. It's all fine that you do that, but you're making some bold choices about what future doors will be open to you.
    • CommentAuthorMaC
    • CommentTimeApr 22nd 2008
     (1912.10)
    Wow, this app is pretty neat. I'd just been using pocket tweet but now this displays all the people twittering in my area, plus allows an update with a photo I've just taken. I really dig the concept, have to see how it responds outside of wifi though.
  7.  (1912.11)
    orwell
    Dumping that much data onto the open net feels like getting a neck tattoo. It's all fine that you do that, but you're making some bold choices about what future doors will be open to you.

    Couldn't agree with you more.

    I am bereft of MySpace+Facebook and my Twitter activity amounts to screaming anonymously into a tin can.

    But I'm the exception these days, not the rule.

    And the rules keep changing.
  8.  (1912.12)
    I keep wondering if privacy, not having any data about you accessible online, is going to come into vogue. When everyone is their own PR department, isn't there something to be obscure? Like the band whose limited EP you have to search out hard. That old story about the best way to fill up an empty club is to stop letting everyone in. A rope line makes people think there's something worth waiting for.

    Oddly this line of thought is making me think of the "reclaimed virginity" movement.
    •  
      CommentAuthorm1k3y
    • CommentTimeApr 22nd 2008
     (1912.13)
    @orwellseyes - i'm shocked you didn't hire someone on those grounds! Not only is it discrimination, but as has just been said the vast majority of the GenY's share their lives online. Stop hiring people for that and you're really limiting the pool you can draw from. It's becoming a post-privacy world, adapt or get out..
    •  
      CommentAuthorm1k3y
    • CommentTimeApr 22nd 2008
     (1912.14)
    i use Twibble on the N95 when i'm out and about somewhere. Similar deal, with cool GoogleMaps integration.
    •  
      CommentAuthorm1k3y
    • CommentTimeApr 22nd 2008 edited
     (1912.15)
    [stupid futurephone double posted]
  9.  (1912.16)
    It's becoming a post-privacy world, adapt or get out..

    Of the world?

    Comedy? Yes?

    I'm not going to thread drift too badly, but I'm in museum and exhibition design. It's not quite cutthroat finance, but it's a competitive business and trade craft/trade secrets abound. We have multi-million dollar clients who want secure lines of information. We also bid on large projects all the time. Bidding processes aren't public and we're competing with alot of very good firms.

    So hiring on someone who vomits up every detail and nuance of their life on a blog or myspace, or is a walking GPS module in the case of this program is not going to cut it. I don't need to be thinking that an employee is bleeding opinions onto the net during a project. The likelihood of a client coming across it is low, but it speaks volumes about professionalism.

    As for it being discrimination, you damn well better believe it is. We discriminate based on what information you offer us and what's freely available about you. Most employers worth a damn are doing background checks for criminal records. A simply google search turned up this woman's extensive online presence.

    Anything you do on the net is something that you're essentially doing in public.

    You're right, it's a post-privacy world, and whatever you put out there is there for anyone to find.

    And yes, you will be judged on it.
    •  
      CommentAuthorm1k3y
    • CommentTimeApr 23rd 2008
     (1912.17)
    ok, let's just say you should be mindful of your online Presence and leave it at that.