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  1.  (2095.1)
    Somehow, Darren Aronofsky's The Fountain just entirely escaped my notice until a few days ago, when I stumbled across someone mentioning it on the "Are Film Adaptations Positive?" thread.
    Having enjoyed Requiem for a Dream and Pi, I decided to pick it up, and was blown away! In the process of looking for it however, I read that it had been booed at Cannes Film Festival, and remembering that Marie Antoinette (an incredibly underrated film, imo) was also famously booed at Cannes, I'm starting to wonder if a good booing is actually a seal of unexpected quality!
    Does anyone know of any other movies that have been booed at Cannes? I'd like to look them up XD
    •  
      CommentAuthortaphead
    • CommentTimeMay 5th 2008
     (2095.2)
    Funny Games caused a mass walkout, if memory serves.
    •  
      CommentAuthorCCosker
    • CommentTimeMay 5th 2008 edited
     (2095.3)
    Strangely, I hated Marie Antoinette on the basis that it was basically a series of short films rather than one big film with an overarching story arc. A noble effort in the sense that that's closer to real life, so it should work for a biography, but that format just doesn't work for a longer-than-two-hours film because the film medium relies on unity of effect to impact its viewers. Having multiple stories completely destroys that.

    I enjoyed The Fountain a lot, but I felt somehow that it could have been so much more. When Aronofsky gave a talk at the Apple store here in New York, he said that the studios slashed his budget to a fraction of what it had been. Considering the scope of the story he was telling, he could have used a few extra million dollars. Don't get me wrong, it was still a great movie and I enjoyed it thoroughly. I just wasn't in love with it the way I felt I should have been.

    So I guess no, getting booed at Cannes isn't a marker for quality for me at all. Nor is the festival itself.

    I remember hearing that Fight Club was booed at some film festival. Possibly Cannes or Tribecca, but I can't remember which. And that's one of my favorite movies.
    • CommentAuthorSasha_mak
    • CommentTimeMay 5th 2008
     (2095.4)
    Twin Peaks Fire Walk with me was booed.
    • CommentAuthorCaBil
    • CommentTimeMay 5th 2008
     (2095.5)
    I thought the film was radically re-edited several times. The Cannes crowd may have booed a different version than the final one.
  2.  (2095.6)
    @CCosker

    I wasn't expecting all booed films to be masterpieces, nor for people to agree about The Fountain and Antoinette (and I don't want a debate on film festivals and the merits of awards to be the point of the thread) I just thought it would be an interesting way to stumble across new movies :)
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      CommentAuthorJay Kay
    • CommentTimeMay 5th 2008
     (2095.7)
    I remember hearing that Southland Tales was booed as well. Haven't seen it, though.

    But yes, The Fountain is an amazing flick.
    •  
      CommentAuthorAlexis
    • CommentTimeMay 5th 2008
     (2095.8)
    I was under the impression that Marie Antoinette was booed largely for political reasons, because the movie portrayed her in a sympathetic way, making her more "Sex in the City" and less egomaniacal ruler, and supposedly the French critics took it personally. "The Fountain" was also booed at Cannes. It looked interesting, but I haven't seen it. "The Brown Bunny" by Vincent Gallo was also notoriously booed, with Roger Ebert calling it the "Worst film in History." I haven't seen that either because it is most famous for Chloƫ Sevigny supposedly giving a real blow job on camera. I don't know if it's really real, though. Looking way back in time, 1966, director John Frankenheimer and actor Rock Hudson were booed for the film "Seconds." I think a film getting booed by a film festival audience doesn't necessarily mean it's bad, but it's not necessarily a good thing, either.
  3.  (2095.9)
    Anyone here familiar with 'A Night at the Apollo'? It sounds to me that the crowd's reactions at Cannes is similar to the Apollo; A little over-reaching in significance.
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      CommentAuthormadmatt213
    • CommentTimeMay 5th 2008
     (2095.10)
    I had never heard Seconds was booed at Cannes. That movie is the shit, I love it so much.
    • CommentAuthorMathias B
    • CommentTimeMay 5th 2008
     (2095.11)
    I guess this isn't a real contribution to the discussion, but really: What kind of person boos a movie? I'm always annoyed when the so-called cultural elite act like five-year olds.
    •  
      CommentAuthorCCosker
    • CommentTimeMay 5th 2008
     (2095.12)
    Didn't mean to come across as snarky, Paul. Just throwing out my opinions of those two films. But yes, it's definitely an interesting way to find a movie. As Mathias pointed out, it's a good way to find out what the self-proclaimed cultural elitists don't like. Often that turns out to be just what the rest of us enjoy.
  4.  (2095.13)
    @Mathias
    That's just what I was thinking too. Not only who boos a movie, but what sort of collection of sheep boo a movie all together?
    @CCosker
    No worries, I think I'm wound a bit tight today =_= I've been reading non-existent snark into all sorts of things.
    •  
      CommentAuthorEgon
    • CommentTimeMay 5th 2008 edited
     (2095.14)
    Wasn't Vincent Gallo's Brown Bunny boo'd as well? (Not saying it was good. Just sayin....)
    •  
      CommentAuthortedcroland
    • CommentTimeMay 5th 2008
     (2095.15)
    I think Brown Bunny was vomited.
    • CommentAuthordot_xom
    • CommentTimeMay 5th 2008
     (2095.16)
    LOL @ tedcroland

    I'm surprised The Fountain got booed. What's weird is that Clerks II got a standing ovation, from what I heard. Not saying it was a bad movie or anything, but a standing ovation? And The Fountain gets boos? That just doesn't seem right...
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      CommentAuthorKPeff
    • CommentTimeMay 5th 2008
     (2095.17)
    @wayne-ree

    They weren't giving Clerks II a standing ovation. They were just applauding the part where the guy giving the donkey show spits in his hand.
    •  
      CommentAuthortaphead
    • CommentTimeMay 5th 2008
     (2095.18)
    (Incidentally: Michael Haneke, the director of Funny Games, felt that the walkout was exactly the correct response to the scene in question. A bit of a troublemaker, that one.)
    • CommentAuthordot_xom
    • CommentTimeMay 5th 2008
     (2095.19)
    @KPeff

    Ah, another classic moment in cinematic history, that one...
    • CommentAuthorzacharius
    • CommentTimeMay 5th 2008
     (2095.20)
    Funny Games is about as close to indefensible as I've ever seen. At least in a mass market film. There have been plenty of low budget exploitation shockers, but to get something like that into the local cineplex makes my head spin. But again, I guess that was the idea.