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      CommentAuthorNetheus
    • CommentTimeNov 28th 2007
     (23.1)
    Those of us that get more than a little bit turned on by large collections of books are going to be in search of a new sexual trick.

    article

    and the actual collection:

    Library
  1.  (23.2)
    Well, at least it IS an actual library. I'm still bugged by someone referring to the bloody Kindle as a library the other day...
    •  
      CommentAuthorJosh T.
    • CommentTimeNov 28th 2007
     (23.3)
    Now if only they could reproduce that old book smell. Then I'd be in heaven.
    •  
      CommentAuthorAriana
    • CommentTimeNov 28th 2007
     (23.4)
    Or the sound and feel of cracking the spine...
    • CommentAuthorKinesys
    • CommentTimeNov 28th 2007
     (23.5)
    Perhaps a spray of some sort. "Bibliophile" By estee lauder or some shit.

    Hell, in the digital age we need libraries more than ever. One good solid EMP burst and it will make the loss of the library of Alexandria seem incredibly small in comparison.
    Granted, the intertubes are nostril deep with crap, but also with more art, music, and thought than you can ever actually see all of. And more dead tree books are being added every day.
    Considering that the human race seems incapable of keeping information in it's HEAD anymore, i think libraries are going to become increasingly necessary.
    • CommentAuthoraluyen
    • CommentTimeNov 28th 2007
     (23.6)
    I keep a digital collection of about 25,000 various e-books for references or inspiration, but the sheer display value of six bookcases full of books; is irreplaceable.

    I love sitting here in my library to read or write, and you can't possibly immerse yourself like that with a digital book (well, unless you happen to be living the plot of "Tron").
  2.  (23.7)
    I had the privilege of moving the most complete Esoteric Library on the US East Coast last August on a 100 degree(f) day. My back hasn't forgiven me, but I have a whole list of new books to acquire.
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      CommentAuthorjrivka
    • CommentTimeNov 28th 2007
     (23.8)
    I've definitely complained within minutes of each other that I have to exist in a physical body, and that libraries no longer have physical card-catalogues.

    Books make me nostalgic.
    • CommentAuthorharchangel
    • CommentTimeNov 28th 2007
     (23.9)
    I think Chip Kidd says it best

    http://www.core77.com/blog/object_culture/kidd_on_kindle_8226.asp
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      CommentAuthorMontiLee
    • CommentTimeNov 28th 2007
     (23.10)
    I love sitting here in my library to read or write, and you can't possibly immerse yourself like that with a digital book (well, unless you happen to be living the plot of "Tron").

    Aluyen - I respectfully disagree.

    I have a Sony Reader (PRS-500) with a collection of currently 50 books and I can certainly loose myself in it's "pages". I can pop it into my bag, and no matter where I am or what mood I'm in I can read something funny or scary or serious. I leave my paper reading for the tub (because bubbles and books go well together) and I do have a rather impressive collection of hard and soft cover books from my favorite authors. No, there is no visual replacement for bookcases lined end to end with colorful covers and familiar names, but I'm not taking my hardcovers on the bus. Thems for home readin'.

    There's no reason why we can't have it both ways - paper books for curling up in a favorite chair and a portable collection for those times when the DMV line is forever.
  3.  (23.11)
    My Girlfriend does not understand the allure of a hardbound book full of good words matched to good ideas. Though the is an avid audiobook person. *sigh*

    More shelf space for my books!
  4.  (23.12)
    Hearing about the Death of the Library reminded me of the tales of woe that came from the transfer of the San Francisco Main from its old building to the new - the new building was designed by a fella who didn't have a head for shelf space, and they ended up with less shelf space in the new building than in the old - wherein the head librarian started culling out large chunks of the stacks and literally disposing of them in the dead of night so as not to get caught - all because he had it in his head that libraries would eventually become "digital", so hardcopy was antiquated. Feh. Nicholas Basbanes writes of the tragedy in Patience and Fortitude, if one wants to read a bibliographic horror story....
    • CommentAuthorPooka
    • CommentTimeNov 28th 2007
     (23.13)
    i very much dislike sitting at a computer or staring at a screen to read a book. I'd much rather have a nice solid edition to put on my shelf after I'm done reading it.
  5.  (23.14)
    Anybody with experience with the Sony or any other reader - how durable are they? I like they idea of being able to relax while reading ebooks, but I'm afraid I'd fall asleep and end up destroying the thing.
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      CommentAuthorSarpedon
    • CommentTimeNov 28th 2007
     (23.15)
    "One good solid EMP burst and it will make the loss of the library of Alexandria seem incredibly small in comparison."
    and on the flip side, a book of matches and 30 seconds of ripping could do some damage to physical libraries.

    "There's no reason why we can't have it both ways - paper books for curling up in a favorite chair and a portable collection for those times when the DMV line is forever."

    I'd say perhaps, we should have it both ways, since physical books have a number of advantages over electronic and vice versa, even without considering the reader's preference. It's a lot cheaper and easier to store catalog search organize and distribute electronic texts than it is physical but the fact that physical books are just that, physical, gives them value. I read somewhere that a person suggested giving you an electronic copy of the book via the kindle if you bought the hard copy. This is exactly what bands have been doing, shell out for 180gram vinyl and you get mp3s. Giving me the ability to search a text I own would be valuable but there's issues with reconciling the two media and at the end of the day it's a different experience, you'll read in a different way, I suspect, just like you don't listen to music the same way in a record player than walking down the street with your mp3 player. It'll be interesting to see what happens to libraries but if things like what Kitsune mentioned happen I'm going to sign up for an MLS just so it doesn't.
    • CommentAuthorKinesys
    • CommentTimeNov 28th 2007
     (23.16)
    Personally, i don't expect that E-readers will really take off until they are incorporated into gear that is geared for media consumption. When Kindle and Ipod spawn and give me something that enables me to listen to music while i read, or read the damn thing to me... Then it'll gain a bit more traction.

    But of course, for that to happen you'll have to see technological leaps that make "Disk Space" and "Battery Life" null concepts, or nearly thus.
  6.  (23.17)
    I enjoy e-reading quite a bit, however, the medium has a ways to go, I am sure that the Sony reader and Kindle are very impressive, but at 300+ green ones, I'll stick to killing trees. I just don't understand, they can make a $300 full blown computer, but they can't produce a decent handheld black/white e-reader for say $50 or $100?
    • CommentAuthormatt d
    • CommentTimeNov 28th 2007
     (23.18)
    damn good point, that is.
    • CommentAuthoreuchrid
    • CommentTimeNov 28th 2007
     (23.19)
    I doubt very much that the Kindle or whatever comes next will replace books. As some people have already pointed out, they'll become something for specific situations, like trains and places on the other end of a long walk. The most apt comparison is the MP3 player, I think: plenty of people stick it in their pocket when they leave the house, but still prefer to pop on a CD when they're sitting around the house. I suspect that the Kindle will be the same, at least for the foreseeable future.

    The foreseeable future being a shorter span of time every day, of course.
    •  
      CommentAuthorCarnadine
    • CommentTimeNov 28th 2007
     (23.20)
    I get along just fine reading ebooks on my three-year-old Palm, a Zire 31. Palm's newest product in the line - the Palm Z22 - is only $89 on Amazon. Add an expansion card, and - imo - you have a superior product to the Kindle - music, games and more. Sure, text resolution isn't as good, and you don't get the nifty wireless newspaper and blog content - but that's not what I use my ebook reader for anyway.