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    • CommentAuthorAmanda
    • CommentTimeJun 6th 2008
     (2493.21)
    heh. don't worry, you're allowed to disagree with me.

    I'm conflicted about LOST. I avoided watching it for the longest time, and then basically watched the first three seasons all within the space of a few weeks while they were streaming on ABC.com in HD for free. The music just rubbed me the wrong way. It seemed forced and contrived, to me.

    but again, this sort of thing is really a matter of preference. I'm not arguing that he's not a good composer. I think he's great. I just don't care for what he writes for that show.

    Also, the 4th season annoys me. I stopped watching. There's only so much twisting and turning I can take before I start to feel nauseous.
  1.  (2493.22)
    I saw Speed Racer very, very drunk at a late night show.

    I haven't had that much fun at a movie in years. Got a little nauseous, but it was

    Michael Giacchino's soundtrack is pitch perfect, beautifully expansive.
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      CommentAuthorkahavi
    • CommentTimeJun 7th 2008
     (2493.23)
    Besides the aforementioned Clint Mansell and Danny Elfman, I really really like Hans Zimmer and Harry Gregson-Williams' work. Zimmer's soundtrack to both Gladiator and The Last Samurai are sublime, and Gregson-Williams' work on The Kingdom Of Heaven was just gorgeous. I also adore Klaus Badelt's The Time Machine soundtrack, which is my current sleeping music.

    Also, have you guys listened to Clint Eastwood's soundtracks? His work on Mystic River, Flags of Our Fathers and Grace Is Gone is heart-breakingly beautiful and wonderfully understated.
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      CommentAuthorWordWill
    • CommentTimeJun 7th 2008
     (2493.24)
    @NickG

    John Murphy, who did 28 WEEKS LATER, did the soundtrack for SUNSHINE in a blind collaboration with Underworld. Underworld, as it happens, used material from their newest album on that score, too, and somehow the licensing or rights management of that is apparently holding up an official soundtrack release of SUNSHINE. Indefinitely.
  2.  (2493.25)
    I'm a huge Oingo Boingo fan, but I can't completely get behind Danny Elfman's soundtracks anymore. He's done many crackers, Nightbreed that people have mentioned here, I love the Pee-Wee Herman scores, and a load more; but he's dialled it in on a few, and I often feel like I'm hearing the same themes again.

    There was a great Mark Mothersbaugh quote about how at one point he was submitting scores to studios and they'd always get back to him with: could it sound a little more Danny Elfman? So he'd go back to it, change it a tiny bit in no way like Danny Elfman, and send it back and they'd be happy.

    I'll throw the Dust Brothers' score for Fight Club in there, I really like that.

    And I love Clint Mansell, and haven't seen or heard the Fountain, so I'll check that out. One of my friends said that Greenwood's score ruined There Will Be Blood for him by completely overpowering what was on screen, so I'll have to check that out too.

    One last pointless soundtrack thing: does anyone else think the themes to The Colour Purple and Jurrasic Park are really similar?
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      CommentAuthortaphead
    • CommentTimeJun 8th 2008
     (2493.26)
    Soderbergh has a knack for finding great collaborators. Martinez' slow moving Solaris is brilliant, and David Holmes has been a perfect pick for his more swinging films.

    In the pop-musician-turned-film-composer category I'd like to give a little love to Jon Brion.

    Howard Shore's score for Crash remains a steady favourite, the zero temperature guitar work is beautiful.

    I also await the moment when David Torn gets to score a movie that's actually good.
    • CommentAuthorNickG
    • CommentTimeJun 8th 2008
     (2493.27)
    @WordWill,
    Thanks for the info man, I'll keep my eyes open for a release.
  3.  (2493.28)
    Wait... did I miss a meeting or does lalo schiffrin (sp?) not count for anything these days? Dirty Harry and Bullit are mighty soundtracks - the epitomy of cool and sinister all wrapped in a weird funky bow.
    • CommentAuthorAmanda
    • CommentTimeJun 8th 2008
     (2493.29)
    "I'm a huge Oingo Boingo fan, but I can't completely get behind Danny Elfman's soundtracks anymore. He's done many crackers, Nightbreed that people have mentioned here, I love the Pee-Wee Herman scores, and a load more; but he's dialled it in on a few, and I often feel like I'm hearing the same themes again.

    There was a great Mark Mothersbaugh quote about how at one point he was submitting scores to studios and they'd always get back to him with: could it sound a little more Danny Elfman? So he'd go back to it, change it a tiny bit in no way like Danny Elfman, and send it back and they'd be happy."

    Like I said above, most of what he's done in the last ten years is crap in my book- but his early stuff I think is great. He had a really distinctive style. When he started he didn't really sound like anyone else. Problem is, he didn't really evolve much either, and all his scores started to sound like watered down versions of previous things he'd written. Its a shame to me that he didn't go further in exploring those other styles that he worked with. As I said earlier, the Black Beauty and Sommersby scores were beautiful... and most people don't even know he wrote them.

    I think a lot of directors use him as something to compare against because of his distinct style, eventhough they really don't have any idea of what goes into it. But then, I could rant all day about directors who think they have any idea what's going on when it comes to music, or even sound in general. Few do, but they still like to feel like they're in control. That's most of what the above comments that Mothersbaugh received were probably about. Even when something doesn't need to be changed, directors will often ask you to make one just to remind you and themselves that they can.

    Doesn't mean doing the work isn't still loads of fun, but everything has its annoying part.
    • CommentAuthorNickG
    • CommentTimeJun 8th 2008
     (2493.30)
    John Carpenter

    I know, he isn't the most amazing, or breathtaking composer out there, but I always respected his work. Yeah, he writes and directs horror movies, but they usually are good. (Not to mention, his version of The Thing is one of my all time favorite movies)

    Anyway, the scores he composed for his movies really fit well, of course, he directed the movies so it helps that he understood the correct tone he was going for.

    Just thought he deserved mentioning. There aren't many good Director/composers out there. Anyone wanna mention some more?
  4.  (2493.31)
    I'm a big fan of Howard Shore, Hans Zimmer, James Newton Howard, Clint Mansell, Danny Elfman... basically most of the guys listed already.

    Two that I haven't seen anything about, though, are Steve Jablonsky and John Powell.

    Jablonsky has done mostly the new wave of horror remakes and big actiony movie scores, but, like Zimmer, he always manages to bring something special to those projects, no matter the strength of the project itself. His scores for the Island and Transformers are fantastic, but the one that really blew me away is his score for the anime movie, Steamboy. Just a classical, melodic, emotionally resonant and exciting score. I can just listen to it over and over. I'd say more than any of the others, that one is a must for fans both Zimmer and John Williams alike.

    John Powell is the guy who did the scores for all three Bourne movies, Mr. & Mrs. Smith, Jumper, United 93 -- basically every movie Doug Liman or Paul Greengrass have made in recent years. He also did the scores for Paycheck, Happy Feet, and X-Men 3. This guy is something special. You listen to him and you start to feel that there's ONE thing he does really well -- electronic-supported action scores -- and then he surprises you with something sweetly heroic like Happy Feet, or quietly emotional like United. I really think John Powell is the best composer working today that nobody's heard of and it's a treat for me whenever he does a new score, regardless of whether I've seen the movie or not.
    • CommentAuthorjohnmuth
    • CommentTimeJun 9th 2008
     (2493.32)
    When some friends and I were rewatching (well, most of them were watching it for the first time) it became sort of a joke, during action scenes to say something about turning around to see the violin player, or after loud crescendos to a commercial break, "I play the trombone for LOST." It's a great score, just very, very...cheesy. And I can see how someone can not like it.

    I totally didn't even feel the Giacchino did the score for Speed Racer. I really liked the guys that have done the scores for the Wachowski's past movies, Don Davis (Bound, The Matrices) and Dario Marianelli (V for Vendetta, and also did Atonement).

    Also, Scott Bomar, who has been working with Craig Brewer (Black Snake Moan, Hustle & Flow) is doing great original scores. A little more bluesy, and modern, but fantastic. (not to mention Samuel L. Jackson singing the blues on Black Snake Moan!! I could listen to that soundtrack all day.)
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      CommentAuthorreosarevok
    • CommentTimeJun 10th 2008 edited
     (2493.33)
    I love Chu Ishikawa's soundtrack for Tetsuo. And Prokofiev's Alexander Nevsky too. As I'm not really into soundtracks (I just got these two cause I loved them so much while watching the films, something that has never happened to me with other movies) that's my top 5
    • CommentAuthorNickG
    • CommentTimeJun 10th 2008
     (2493.34)
    @Johnmuth

    Your right, I too love the soundtrack for Black Snake Moan. I couldn't get enough of it for the longest time. It was funny too, because I just recently watched the movie, yet I had the soundtrack for a year!
    • CommentAuthorjohnmuth
    • CommentTimeJun 10th 2008
     (2493.35)
    On the soundtrack, I mostly listen to the Scot Bomar songs, or Sam Jackson, there's only one or two other songs that I like a lot on there. I need to get the Hustle & Flow soundtrack still.
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      CommentAuthorwilliac
    • CommentTimeJun 10th 2008
     (2493.36)
    Henry Mancini - c'mon he did Breakfast at Tiffany's and Lifeforce!
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      CommentAuthorCat Vincent
    • CommentTimeJun 10th 2008 edited
     (2493.37)
    Some great composers and scores here already. I note a couple of things things;

    Nobody has mentioned one of the few women who composed movie soundtracks - the late Shirley Walker. Listen to her score for Batman - Mask of the Phantasm sometime. (In fact, see the movie if you haven't yet... even after Batman Begins, I rate it as the best Bat movie yet.)

    And while we're on the women, how come nobody praising Hans Zimmer's work on Gladiator mentioned he co-wrote the score with Lisa Gerrard of Dead Can Dance?

    Anyone else spellbound by Kenji Kawai's scores for the Ghost In The Shell movies? Carles Cases' Cthulhu chants for the Dagon score?
    Or Peter Gabriel's soundtrack to Last Temptation of Christ? Phillip Glass on Kundun and Candyman? Jeff Beale's music for Carnivale? The RZA's work on Ghost Dog?

    And where's the love for Carter Burwell?

    (And if you really want to get wacky, there's the whole subset of best-movie-soundtracks-to-fuck-to...)
  5.  (2493.38)
    Carter Burwell IS being grossly under-represented.

    His music Barton Fink in particular is a personal favorite.
    • CommentAuthorNickG
    • CommentTimeJun 11th 2008
     (2493.39)
    @Cat Vincent

    Batman Mask of the Phantasm IS the best Batman Movie! lol, but of course Batman Begins is a very close second. Here's hoping The Dark Knight will soon take the lead!
    • CommentAuthorrobb
    • CommentTimeJun 11th 2008
     (2493.40)
    The Hauntological Congress thread led me to cue up a "hauntology" playlist on last.fm. that spat out this soundtrack gem:
    Basil Kirchin: "The Abominable Dr. Phibes"