Not signed in (Sign In)
    •  
      CommentAuthormuse hick
    • CommentTimeJun 16th 2008
     (2620.1)
    http://www.creativebyline.com/
    I hope it's not inappropriate to post this here, but I was wondering if anyone had ever heard of this site and had any experience with them? I'd like to believe it works but I am skeptical of anything with this kind of set up. What do people think? Genuine, or a way for someone to harvest ideas?
    • CommentAuthorPeter-CB
    • CommentTimeAug 27th 2008
     (2620.2)
    I've just begun interning at Creative Byline, so let me share some of my story.

    I recently graduated with a B.A. in English/Creative Writing and am pursuing my M.F.A. over the next three to four years. I have the first draft of a novel, along with a new novel I've just begun, and a novella. When I'm satisfied on my end, I'll submit them to Creative Byline's process. The writers with whom I'm most familiar--my friends--are extremely enthusiastic about the process and are all working on their own query packages.

    Creative Byline's partnered with reputable publishers, as you can see from our website, and we're always working on adding more to our list. Here's a comment from Gary Krebs, Group Publisher for Globe Pequot Press: “I’m thrilled GPP has joined up with Creative Byline. We are always on the lookout for creative new ways to find exciting book proposals. The subscription offers that and more—but with the immediacy of the web. We look forward to seeing what creative romances develop from this unique system, which is like an online dating service for book proposals." (Read the full press release on our site here: http://www.creativebyline.com/news/news1.aspx )

    Brad MacLean, our CEO, responded to the "idea harvesting" question thus: "Creative Byline isn’t a posting board, at least not in the traditional sense of the word. We’re not open to the public and writers can’t peruse other writers’ manuscripts. Additionally, editors must be subscribers (through contracts their publishing houses sign with us). They don’t need to remember to check for manuscripts the way they do on boards. Our system sends the editor an e-mail with links when there are qualified manuscripts that match that editor’s criteria. No manuscripts show up in an editor’s e-mail box, ever. The manuscripts remain on our system the entire time. Our contracts are with traditional publishers only."

    We will soon add a "Testimonials" section to our blog. Keep checking back. Thanks for the question! If you have more, please don't hesitate to ask.

    Peter Jurmu
    Internet Marketing Associate
    Creative Byline, Inc.
    peter.jurmu@creativebyline.com
    http://www.creativebyline.com/
    http://creativebyline.wordpress.com/
    •  
      CommentAuthoroutlawpoet
    • CommentTimeAug 27th 2008
     (2620.3)
    this is a decent review:
    http://accrispin.blogspot.com/2008/03/victoria-strauss-creative-byline-great.html

    I'm very leery of intermediate services between editors and writers, because it's not clear who their customers are. For whom is the service being improved and focused? Institutionally, companies always zero in on their recompenses to the best of their ability, so where do they make their money, and how do they measure success?
    • CommentAuthorPeter-CB
    • CommentTimeAug 27th 2008 edited
     (2620.4)
    Good questions, outlawpoet. Our CEO, Brad MacLean, actually responded to Victoria Strauss' review back in March. Scroll down the page a bit and you'll find his response. (I pulled the above quote from it.) Here are some of my own comments:

    -Creative Byline's website went live in December 2007 with an investment from Lakeshore Advantage, a seed fund started in West Michigan that focuses primarily on startups drawing on local engineering and tech talent. Here is the address for the press release on LA's website regarding CB: http://www.lakeshoreadvantage.com/eventaddtxt3.asp?EventID=121

    -Your skepticism is entirely understandable. Several scams have unfolded in the past twenty years that tarnished the image of intermediaries (as apart from lit. agencies) and, among other things (the rise of fraudulent internet advertising, for instance), created the need for such blogs as Ms. Strauss's and a general, responsible wariness on the part of authors in the face of rapidly advancing technology and unscrupulous businesses. One of CB's goals is to remain entirely transparent about our process, guarantee, and partnerships with publishers so that writers AND editors can trust that we are, to the utmost of our ability, helping them forge the connections that they seek. Thus far we've proven ourselves to houses such as GPP, St. Martin's, Dutton's Children Books, and Tor/Forge and will, as I said, also soon be posting an "Author Testimonials" section on our blog. Here is a full list the publishers CB has signed to date: http://www.creativebyline.com/FAQ/Publishers.aspx

    -Ms. Strauss posts a segment of an account by Mike Chan (here is the full account of his experience: http://juliemanenti.blogspot.com/2008/08/creative-byline-revolution.html), who dealt extensively with our customer service personnel over the course of his manuscript submission process and enabled our staff to learn ways in which to better serve our customers. Any problem a member has with our first readers or any part of our service, or any question not on our FAQ--or if the FAQ is unclear--about the process in general will be promptly addressed if it is brought to our attention (clientservices@creativebyline.com) or posted on our blog (http://creativebyline.wordpress.com). That is part of Creative Byline's vision of success. The ultimate success is, of course, opening dialogues and making matches between editors and authors that otherwise would never have occurred. On that note, we've secured partnerships with such prominent and reputable publishing houses as I mentioned above (and are constantly working at bringing more on board), received from their editors a manuscript-RESPONSE (as opposed to review) rate of over 80% within three weeks to qualified manuscripts (which is unheard of in the mail-submission process), and participated in a growing dialogue about alternatives to traditional forms of manuscript submission and getting an editor's attention. Some editors have even asked to see other work from certain authors. We're never satisfied when it comes to refining our company's approach, but thus far we feel we've made significant progress and will continue to do so.

    Take a look at our website (http://www.creativebyline.com/) and our full FAQ (http://www.creativebyline.com/FAQ/GeneralQuestions.aspx)! And if you're still not convinced, send any of us an email, and we'll be glad to talk with you further.

    Thanks!

    Peter Jurmu
    Internet Marketing Associate
    Creative Byline, Inc.
    peter.jurmu@creativebyline.com
    http://www.creativebyline.com/
    http://creativebyline.wordpress.com/