Not signed in (Sign In)
    •  
      CommentAuthorirenekaoru
    • CommentTimeJan 21st 2008 edited
     (28.41)
    I am loathe to tell you all of my secrets but IMO futurists smell like CdG Odeur 71. I have a bottle. It is the sex.

    The ultimate anti-perfume. The notes are inspired by dust on a hot lightbulb, bamboo, metal, electricity and lettuce juice…no lie! But what does it smell like? Surprisingly, it's a completely wearable scent; metal and electricity manifest as the invigorating smell of ozone just before a storm, and the combination of we-don't-know-what makes for a familiar soapy freshness. Hot laundry right out of the dryer served up on your clean, sexy Xerox machine. Released in 2000, Odeur 71 continues to make huge stir-not just for its revolutionary scent structure, but because it's a testament that a combination of the truly weird can make a truly fantastic fragrance.
  1.  (28.42)
    I was worried that Irene's post was going to be about sloths
    •  
      CommentAuthorAriana
    • CommentTimeJan 21st 2008
     (28.43)
    Oh, you know she's got a bottle of sloth musk, too.
  2.  (28.44)
    Well, it's not like the sloths could run away at high speed or anything, is it?
    •  
      CommentAuthorAriana
    • CommentTimeJan 21st 2008
     (28.45)
    You make a good point. Which makes me wonder why sloth's still on my "Have yet to have had as steak" list... hm.

    (I'm certain I can outrun Irene at high speed, yes.)
  3.  (28.46)
    I am completely obsessed with BPAL too. I'm not sorry.

    My husband picked up Mechanical Phoenix. It's nice, though not what we expected. I hear there's a whole line of Steampunk scents in the works and I look forward to seeing what they come up with.
  4.  (28.47)
    We should have thought of this perfume scam back in the cpunk days. Create a heady melange of stale Sobranie smoke, gnawed knuckles, ozone, that back-of-the-throat metallic reek from burning speed off a sheet of foil, OD fever sweat, cordite and new latex.

    Splash it on, ladies, and become the queen bee to every skinny guy in a black trenchcoat who forgets to bathe or brush his teeth because he's busy uploading himself in his mom's basement via her AOL account!
    •  
      CommentAuthorZ
    • CommentTimeJan 24th 2008
     (28.48)
    @Kadrey

    Purchase now, and we'll also send you a free sample of 'Dead Dog', with notes of diesel, singed fir, wet iron and stale piss.

    ...become the queen bee to every skinny guy in a black trenchcoat getting <a href="http://freakangels.com/whitechapel/comments.php?DiscussionID=616&page=1#Item_16">kicked off the bus for leading you around on a dog chain</a> on public transit.

    - Z
  5.  (28.49)
    Taser jackets. I used to write about things like that. Believe it or not versions of them have been around for almost 20 years. I remember interviewing private security supply manufacturers back in the mid-90s. These companies had been around quietly for some time. The guys I talked to were the ones who built the Popemobile. They'll build you a Popemobile, too, for the right money. Better yet, they'll build you one that looks like a stock Mercedes or other car, but works like James Bond fucked a Transformer and you're driving their baby.

    One of the first, cheapest products these guys showed me were stun gun gloves and jackets. The gloves were simple and brilliant. There was an electrode on one finger and another on the thumb. If someone grabbed you, you just put your hand on them. As long as both of your fingers touched the assailant, it would complete the circuit and jolt the guy enough to pee his pants and let you go. They made jackets like that, too. They would fine wire into all the exposed surfaces so that when you activated the defense switch, anyone who touched you would get to ride the lightning until he released you.

    I laughed when they trotted out the slick Hugo Boss-style bulletproof trenchcoat, but wasn't as amused with the bulletproof toddler-wear. Some shit just isn't that funny.
    •  
      CommentAuthorVespers
    • CommentTimeJan 24th 2008
     (28.50)
    Bulletproof...trenchcoat? They make those? Awesome. Altho I imagine if a bullet hit resistant cloth in the skirt of a trenchcoat, it might well snap in such a way as to do almost as much damage as if the damn thing had just hit.

    Also, dammit, if people don't stop bringing up BPAL everywhere I go, even *I* am gonna snap and get some, and I'm a guy. And 19. And pretty much broke... You can't escape it anywhere, even Neil Gaiman writes about his BPAL scents on his blog, dammit.
    •  
      CommentAuthorZ
    • CommentTimeJan 24th 2008
     (28.51)
    @Vespers

    <a href="http://www.blackphoenixalchemylab.com/neverwhere.html">That's because they use his work</a>.

    - Z
    •  
      CommentAuthorVespers
    • CommentTimeJan 24th 2008
     (28.52)
    I know that's why. That's how I heard of BPAL in the first place, his blog. He's a dirty enabler, that man. But he's allowed on account of brilliance.
    •  
      CommentAuthorZ
    • CommentTimeJan 24th 2008
     (28.53)
    And on account of charity work, besides. That's always a plus.

    - Z
  6.  (28.54)
    Snicker. I do have a bunch of BPAL scents, as does my husband. I belive he was wearing Whitechapel the other day. Some of his other favorites are Geek, Freak Show, Graveyard Dirt and Arkham. I like the sweets ones like Shill , which smells like buttered popcorn and Midway, which is funnel cake, caramel apple, cotton candy, salt water taffy and sugar tart. I'm wearing Eat Me right now...yes, I know I'm tempting fate; I walk by a Weight Watchers and that's all she wrote!
    •  
      CommentAuthorOwsler
    • CommentTimeFeb 4th 2008
     (28.55)
    Not to go off on a tangent, but Comme Des Garcons does a Synthetic range with titles like Garage and Tar:

    http://shop.doverstreetmarket.com/product_info.php?products_id=21

    One description of Tar was quite interesting:

    Tar notes
    town gas, vapours of bitumen, bergamot, earth notes, opoponax, styrax, grilled cigarettes, pyrogenic notes
  7.  (28.56)
    The new complete Steampunk series just went live.

    Phoenix Steamworks and Research Facility
    •  
      CommentAuthorRachel
    • CommentTimeApr 22nd 2008
     (28.57)
    My Mechanical Phoenix arrived.

    It's quite good but is really overshadowed by the Blood Phoenix which makes me happy in my pants.
  8.  (28.58)
    "what do you do for a living?"
    "I make specialty perfumes."
    "Like what?"
    "I recently made one based on the smell of a eldritch tome and the smell of ozone. Another was based on a small steam-powered motor, powered by smoldering coals."
    "...really."

    All kidding aside, that entire venture looks amazing. I wish I had some disposable income to buy something.
    •  
      CommentAuthorZ
    • CommentTimeMay 8th 2008
     (28.59)
    <blockquote>I wish I had some disposable income to buy something.</blockquote> Speaking of disposable income, this NY Times article seems to cover the entire range of 'steampunk product', including iPhone covers.


    <ol><img src="http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/05/08/fashion/steam_600.jpg" alt="" /></ol> <blockquote><ol><strong><a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2008/05/08/fashion/08PUNK.html?ei=5087&em=&en=38483d5ad02044a4&ex=1210392000&pagewanted=print">Steampunk Moves Between 2 Worlds</a></strong>
    <strong>NY TIMES -- </strong> [..] To some, “steampunk” is a catchall term, a concept in search of a visual identity. “To me, it’s essentially the intersection of technology and romance,” said Jake von Slatt, a designer in Boston and the proprietor of the Steampunk Workshop (steampunkworkshop.com), where he exhibits such curiosities as a computer furnished with a brass-frame monitor and vintage typewriter keys.

    That definition is loose enough to accommodate a stew of influences, including the streamlined retro-futurism of Flash Gordon and Japanese animation with its goggle-wearing hackers, the postapocalyptic scavenger style of “Mad Max,” and vaudeville, burlesque and the structured gentility of the Victorian age. In aggregate, steampunk is a trend that is rapidly outgrowing niche status.

    [..]

    Devotees of the culture read Jules Verne and H. G. Wells, as well as more recent speculative fiction by William Gibson, James P. Blaylock and Paul Di Filippo, the author of “The Steampunk Trilogy,” the historical science fiction novellas that lent the culture its name. They watch films like “The City of Lost Children” (with costumes designed by Jean Paul Gaultier), “The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen” and “Brazil,” Terry Gilliam’s dystopian fantasy satirizing the modern industrial age; and they listen to melodeons and Gypsy strings mixed with industrial goth.
    [..]

    And, in keeping with the make-it-yourself ethos of punk, they assemble their own fashions, an adventurous pastiche of neo-Victorian, Edwardian and military style accented with sometimes crudely mechanized accouterments like brass goggles and wings made from pulleys, harnesses and clockwork pendants, to say nothing of the odd ray gun dangling at the hip. Steampunk style is corseted, built on a scaffolding of bustles, crinolines and parasols and high-arced sleeves not unlike those favored by the movement’s designer idols: Nicolas Ghesquiere of Balenciaga, Alexander McQueen and, yes, even Ralph Lauren.

    [..]

    The elaborate mourning dresses, waistcoats, hacking jackets and high-button shoes are goth’s stepchildren, for sure, but the overall look is “not so much eyeliner and fishnets,” [..] </ol></blockquote>