Not signed in (Sign In)
  1.  (2908.1)
    Unbelievable (link in Portuguese, summarized translation below)

    UPDATE: the BBC article (Thanks, Chris)

    According to the news, this past Sunday, two Brazilian policemen were chasing perpetrators in a black car (a Fiat Stilo) in Rio de Janeiro. There was gunfire. But there was another black (actually, dark grey: a Palio Weekend) car in the road, drove by Alessandra Amorim Soares and with her three-year-old son João Roberto and nine-month-old son (his name is not revealed). After hearing the sirens, Alessandra parked the car on the side of the road to open way for the policemen - but the policemen confused her car with the perpetrators' car (and couldn't see anyone inside due to tinted windows).

    Despite the car being PARKED, the policemen fired sixteen times on it and one of the bullets hit João Roberto in the back of the head, causing him to have encephalic death yesterday. According to her husband (who spoke to the press in her stead), Alessandra - injured in her legs and stomach by shrapel - opened the window and tossed a children's bag out of it to show she was transporting kids. The policemen even yelled: "Where's the criminal? Where's the criminal?". Alessandra left the car, opened the back door, picked up João's body, lied it on the ground and said twice: "you killed my son". The nine-month-old son wasn't hurt.

    --------

    Yeah. They fired sixteen times on a parked car.The policemen say they were aiming for the actual car they should be chasing. And missed. Sixteen times, apparently.

    A parked car with closed windows whose occupants weren't showing any sign of resistance.

    And now a three-year-old kid is dead.

    UPDATE II: the video showing the policemen taking action.

    •  
      CommentAuthorAlastair
    • CommentTimeJul 8th 2008
     (2908.2)
    damn...
  2.  (2908.3)
    And the BBC article on it, for good measure.
    •  
      CommentAuthorJeff Owens
    • CommentTimeJul 8th 2008
     (2908.4)
    Any word on what happened/is going to happen to the police involved? A good stoning, I should hope. (The kind not involving drugs, of course.)
  3.  (2908.5)
    Cops going bonkers with their guns is unbelievable?
  4.  (2908.6)
    Cops going bonkers with their guns is unbelievable?


    Like this? Shooting at a PARKED CAR? Yes, I'd say it is.
  5.  (2908.7)
    Any word on what happened/is going to happen to the police involved?


    So far, the investigator has been asking for temporary jailtime.

    Oh, yes: they got the thing on tape.

  6.  (2908.8)
    Shit like this happens in America a lot too, and I hate to say it, but our cops generally get off with a slap on the wrist. Look at the Amadou Diallo case--none of those guys got anything.

    This is, of course, a total travesty.
    • CommentAuthorRenThing
    • CommentTimeJul 8th 2008
     (2908.9)
    Hell, there's a teacher in Ohio who burned crosses into students' arms with a device that says, quite obviously, not to put the burning end against skin ever; the school board knew about it for years and did nothing, the guy was still teaching until this year when a family filed a lawsuit against the school board. Last time I checked, burning someone against their will was illegal but no charges have been filed.
    •  
      CommentAuthorDasai
    • CommentTimeJul 13th 2008
     (2908.10)
    *sigh* Well, I WAS going to go to bed, but now I'm angry.

    There are no more heroes in this world.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbschory
    • CommentTimeJul 13th 2008
     (2908.11)
    @Dasai

    I see what you're saying, but I think there definitely are heroes left in this world. They are people like @Andrenavarro who make sure that massive awful fuckups like this don't just get swept under the table, but brought out for us to see and hopefully do something about and prevent from happening again.
    •  
      CommentAuthorDasai
    • CommentTimeJul 18th 2008
     (2908.12)
    @bschory

    I know, but seeing that shouldn't have the ticket price of a child's life.
  7.  (2908.13)
    I see what you're saying, but I think there definitely are heroes left in this world. They are people like @Andrenavarro who make sure that massive awful fuckups like this don't just get swept under the table, but brought out for us to see and hopefully do something about and prevent from happening again.


    Thanks, man. But all I did was get angry and spread the word. "Hero" will be the politician who actually does something about it instead of empty promises... and it's easier the boy coming back to life than that happening, it seems.

    The kid's corneas were donated to a blind-from-birth girl who now can see a little and her vision is gradually getting better. Awfully nice of the boy's family to allow the donation. If my kid died like this, I'd be horrified of anyone removing anything from his body.
  8.  (2908.14)
    Have you seen the extras on the City of God DVD? It doesn't surprise me.
  9.  (2908.15)
    @Andrenavarro
    If my kid died like this, I'd be horrified of anyone removing anything from his body.

    Why? His body is dead - he's not using it anymore (suppose which depends on your personal beliefs, though. A topic for another thread, I think. Wouldn't want to get distracted from the topic of this one.)

    Did the police involved get any sort of disciplinary action?
  10.  (2908.16)
    Why? His body is dead - he's not using it anymore (suppose which depends on your personal beliefs, though. A topic for another thread, I think. Wouldn't want to get distracted from the topic of this one.)


    I'm an atheist. But think about it: your son has died. You're extremely depressed to say the least. Then you imagine a surgeon picking things off of his corpse. Would that cheer you up? I don't have a son, but if I did, I'd probably cry my eyes out as I donated his corneas. It would be liked admitting to myself, he's DEAD, he's GONE, you'll never see him again in your life. And that is something sublimely hard to do merely a few days after his death. But never having lost a son, I can't imagine how great the pain is, I can simply applaud his parents for thinking about other people when they are in such a horrible situation themselves.

    Did the police involved get any sort of disciplinary action?


    I'm not finding further news on the subject and I can't look up thoroughly right now, but here's what I heard: they've been expelled from the Military Police and sentenced to twenty-five years in prison. But there's this immensely stupid law here that whenever your sentence is above twenty years, you have a right to ANOTHER judgment. Mmmm, rot in prison or try again? Of course they'll try again. And in the second judgment, they usually are freed.

    That's what I HEARD from a friend. Will try to confirm it later.
  11.  (2908.17)
    your son has died. You're extremely depressed to say the least. Then you imagine a surgeon picking things off of his corpse. Would that cheer you up?

    (Keep in mind I have no children)

    Yes, actually. I'd rather someone get some benefit from my child's death; might help me with the depression and angst. I've a close family member that received a heart transplant. So I know someone out there died, and my family member recieved that person's heart. Tragic and sucky, but I'm still glad that person's family decided to try and help people after their loved one had passed away (other organs were also given to other people from that same person).


    And in the second judgment, they usually are freed.
    That is seriously fucked up.
    • CommentAuthorKosmopolit
    • CommentTimeJul 19th 2008
     (2908.18)
    I'm not finding further news on the subject and I can't look up thoroughly right now, but here's what I heard: they've been expelled from the Military Police and sentenced to twenty-five years in prison. But there's this immensely stupid law here that whenever your sentence is above twenty years, you have a right to ANOTHER judgment. Mmmm, rot in prison or try again? Of course they'll try again. And in the second judgment, they usually are freed.

    That's what I HEARD from a friend. Will try to confirm it later.


    Too be honest, I'm speaking here primarily from prejudice and the inevitably-sensationalistic media but I get the impression that Brazilian police regularly kill kids in the favelas with impunity.

    I think there are two main reasons this case got attention - it was caught on video and the victim came from a middle-class family.
  12.  (2908.19)
    I have to back Spiral here.

    Organ donation depends on people making that choice sometimes; if people didn't, allot more tragedies would occur.
    •  
      CommentAuthorAdam
    • CommentTimeJul 20th 2008
     (2908.20)
    I agree wholeheartedly with the moral highground of that statement, but I think the core of what andre's saying is that the parent's actually had the initiative, in their incredible black hole of trauma, to say that the parts should go to those who need them. Whereas in the case of adult donors, its the person themself who decided prior to their death to be listed on the donor registry -- its already been decided and the ground-work is done. The relatives get told that this was the wish of the dead person, and they just have to say "Oh. Yes, I guess thats for the best." Children, of course, are not registered beforehand. Even if it was a suggestion of the attending surgeon breaking the news, it was remarkably strong of the parents to agree and not just get instantly hurt and outraged as would be the instinct/impulse of most people, I reckon...