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      CommentAuthormagatsu
    • CommentTimeJul 31st 2008
     (3110.1)
    I had a nice time at the con, but unlike very many people, I was there for business (my store had a booth selling gold and silver age comics). Stuck at the booth the whole time while Charles Stross signed books less than 20 feet away from me, but business was decent for us, and I'm glad to see that others did well.

    Any other thoughts on the state of business from "Exhibitors" or "Professionals"?
  1.  (3110.2)
    This year's SDCC turned out to be a mixed bag for me. Personal crises kept me from fully getting my geek on.

    That said, the only really sucky moments had to do with watching annoying fan behavior. Seeing a fan ask Joss Whedon why she should get interested in Whedon's DOLLHOUSE made me cringe.

    But that got balanced out by being introduced to the wonderfulness of SPACED (with Edgar Wright, Simon Pegg, and Juliet Stevenson present), learning that Larry Marder's doing new tales of the Beanworld, and catching Patton Oswalt's set on the last Comedians of Comedy show. Oswalt's idea for new male superhero costumes, though, would probably cause DC and Marvel editors to scream "No way, no how, no where."
    • CommentAuthorkhuxford
    • CommentTimeJul 31st 2008
     (3110.3)
    <em>And just who in their right fucking mind takes their babies and toddlers to this madness? You people should be hauled away by Child Protective Services for abuse. Good God Almighty, for the love of Christ, don't EVER,EVER, EVER take the most precious persons in your life, tiny and defenseless as they are, to this clusterfuck. Leave them with responsible trusted caregivers or stay the fuck home.</em>

    Amen. This is comparable to the parents that bring their infant into a 9pm showing of WANTED. It has little to nothing that is appropriate entertainment for the kid and is guaranteed to negatively impact the experience for many other attendees.
    • CommentAuthorTate
    • CommentTimeAug 3rd 2008
     (3110.4)
    My first and likely last Comic Con.
    Woke up the day I was set to leave sick. Spent packing and the flight out in a daze. Feeling vaguely guilty I was going to make someone sick and vowing to shake no hands.
    My traveling companions discovered free crap and relentlessly hunted for more the entire convention. I kept saying things like: "Are you really going to use a Wonder Woman bag anywhere, but here?" "So you found that awesome poster on the floor, did you?" "So you noticed when you wear your blouse open you get more stuff? That's great."
    Did enjoy some panels, but the very large ones I was watching the whole thing on a giant screen. I might as well have watched it at home on TV where I can smoke.
    The floor was so crowded I mainly avoided it, thus more time at panels. Some of which I attended just to sit down for awhile.
    Did get to meet some creators who generally seemed to think I had never heard of them and were either completely disinterested everything or very interested in the girl standing next to me.
    On the other hand I really like San Diego. Hit the beach afterward had some great seafood.
    • CommentAuthorWakefield
    • CommentTimeAug 3rd 2008 edited
     (3110.5)
    deleted
    • CommentAuthorWakefield
    • CommentTimeAug 3rd 2008
     (3110.6)
    Triumph's coverage.
  2.  (3110.7)
    I worked at the Mile High Comics booth all 4 days, one 4-hour shift each day. Having the Exhibitor badge was a godsend, I was able to get in early and do some of my browsing and purchasing before the show even opened. Having said that, this show definitely left a bad taste in my mouth. I'm in agreement with the 30% reduction, as well as the stroller sentiment. Acme Industries seriously mishandled the Matt Groening signing (I understand when the guy says he can only sign 15 people's stuff, but when you give out NUMBERED tickets, tickets 1-15 should be the ones to get signed, not first-come, first-serve). And NECA's handling of the Watchman lithograph giveaway was disgraceful.

    At the booth, we sold 300 copies of the Watchman trade paperback in about 3 hours on Friday. And Sunday was simply a madhouse, no one could move it was so packed in there (the booth).

    Highlights: Picking up the original art page 13 from Frank Ironwine, signed by Carla Speed McNeil and Warren (Warren, the CBLDF guys were saying how nice it was of you to sign that in Chicago, even though your hand was a pulp); getting Howard Chaykin to sign American Flagg #1, telling Jimmy Palmiotti that Jonah Hex #28 was a seriously fucked up story, chatting with Steven Seagle, seeing all the folks at Avatar again (showing Mike Wolfer the leather cover Gravel books was cool), talking to Ed Brubaker, found a really cool book called Helen Killer...

    I'll be there again next year, probably just getting sketches and whatnot. It wouldn't bother me at all if the movie/toy/gaming part of SDCC went to Vegas or wherever, and leave the comics in San Diego.
  3.  (3110.8)
    "Amen. This is comparable to the parents that bring their infant into a 9pm showing of WANTED. It has little to nothing that is appropriate entertainment for the kid and is guaranteed to negatively impact the experience for many other attendees."

    Really? Taking a baby to a pop culture show where MANY of the exhibits are for kids of ALL AGES and is comfortably loud (in acceptable decibel ranges for a child, about the same as a sleep sheep) is comparable to taking a baby to a VERY LOUD, violent, not-intended-for-children movie about assasins where adults have an expectation of silence except for what is on the screen? Really?

    First of all, no one should even be seeing Wanted, so your argument is immediately flawed. And I can't tell you how many of those "adults" peek at their cell phones and talk during the film. I'd rather have a child next to who is actually watching the movie, inappropriate or not, than these rude assholes. Also, Comic Con is for adults, yes, but it is also for kids, and if a baby who is attached to the chest of a mother or father walking the show floor negatively impacts an attendee more than the smelly, obese, rude fan-boys climbing over each other for a free postcard, you must be one of those fan boys.

    For instance, my wife and child and I hung out at the Nickelodeon booth for most of the day on Saturday. During that time, they were handing out slap bracelets with various Nickelodeon cartoon characters on it. The booth staffers were just slapping them on pretty much anyone that walked by, and that was fine, but then you had those 40 year old idiots who shove their way to the booth through a bunch of kids, knocking them over, for a fucking orange cloth covered piece of bent metal who complain about the KIDS ruining the show!

    Please. If a child can ruin the show for you, you are there for the wrong reasons. Get over it.
  4.  (3110.9)
    My first ever San Diego. I loved it. 5 days of Awesome. The closest big con to this one I've been to was HobbyStar Toronto FanExpo. I found this con to be slightly less crowded (closest it came was Preview night at the corporate area with people wanting their free swag), with higher comics to other stuff ratio, more comics stuff overall due to the sheer size and a greater diversity of comic material. And San Diego weather was beautiful. Being right on the Mexican boarder I thought it would hot as hell, I was surprised that it was cooler there than it is in Canada now. Every single day too. I now see why San Diego is so popular.

    I took Pictures and recorded a bunch of panels, including the Eisner Awards.

    What I was pleasantly surprised and flattered by was virtually everybody I talked to recognized my name. Some remembered where from, others did not but asked me what I did.

    My only disappointment was not seeing/meeting everybody I wanted to meet.

    One of the keys for me to enjoying the con was staying away from all the BIG NAME celebrity stuff that I knew would have massive line ups.
    •  
      CommentAuthorAdamK
    • CommentTimeAug 5th 2008
     (3110.10)
    I'm sorry, but no one has the right to crash into my legs repeatedly because they're not watching where they push their giant stroller, or take up half an aisle while placing their EMPTY stroller out across it, no matter how much they pay. Fact is, in a place where it's difficult to walk because of the volume of people without them, strollers really have no place. At best, they're an annoyance. At worst, a hazard. That has NOTHING to do with unladen pedestrians not watching where they're going, it has everything to do with the crowded situation.
    And you know what? Yes, the super douchey speculator fanboys DO go a long way toward making things unpleasant, but deciding that everyone who doesn't agree with you MUST be one of those immediately invalidates everything else you may have said, valid points or not.
  5.  (3110.11)
    If it were me, I'd take a stroller with BEN HUR-style spikes on the wheels.

    Regardless of whether or not there was a kid in it.
  6.  (3110.12)
  7.  (3110.13)
    on stroller / pram pushing, my top tips are to shout "excuse me", then "coming through" and / or "MOVE!", then after ploughing into ignorance with legs, "serves you right".
    I find the Glaswegian accent works wonders in this respect.

    anyone attempting jumping over / stepping over / interfering with said method of conveying precious cargo will be met with brute force and harsh words.
  8.  (3110.14)
    * AdamK
    "I'm sorry, but no one has the right to crash into my legs repeatedly because they're not watching where they push their giant stroller, or take up half an aisle while placing their EMPTY stroller out across it, no matter how much they pay. Fact is, in a place where it's difficult to walk because of the volume of people without them, strollers really have no place. At best, they're an annoyance. At worst, a hazard. That has NOTHING to do with unladen pedestrians not watching where they're going, it has everything to do with the crowded situation."

    No, that has to do with rude people, not people with strollers. Fact is, those people would find a way to make your life difficult whether they had a stroller or not. The people who crash into you with a stroller apropos of nothing are the exact same people who jump over the stroller for swag or who walk one ... foot ... an ... hour ... across ... the ... floor ... . Those people are going to annoy you regardless of what accouterments they are adorned with - it is just easier to pick on strollers so there you go.

    "And you know what? Yes, the super douchey speculator fanboys DO go a long way toward making things unpleasant, but deciding that everyone who doesn't agree with you MUST be one of those immediately invalidates everything else you may have said, valid points or not. "

    EDIT: There is a huge difference between "All people with strollers/children under an age I've decided upon should not go to the show." and "People who complain about kids and strollers have forgotten what the show is about." The first read through was incorrect - I was rushing to get out of the door. In truth, there are certain people/types of strollers that should not be allowed - the extra wide kind. I notice you aren't complaining about people on their motorized trikes. Many of those people can probably walk, they just don't want to. Double wide strollers I will agree should not be allowed - they make ones that are thin and long and those I see no problem with. I see your point, I just think it is the same point as the grumpy old man telling those kids to "Get off his lawn".

    Frenchbloke, thank you. That was my point exactly.
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      CommentAuthorAdamK
    • CommentTimeAug 6th 2008
     (3110.15)
    The only person I saw on a motorized trike was Ray Bradbury, and I'm not about to bitch that guy out for anything.
    And believe me, I get equally pissed at the people who do the slow walk in the middle of the aisles who aren't even looking at anything. I have NO problem with children at the con, either. One of my favorite things is a little kid dressed as their favorite character having a great time. Perhaps I wouldn't be as bothered if more people followed the Frenchbloke plan, in which they warn others of their presence. Unfortunately, I did not encounter ANY of those, just the demolition derby types and it soured me on strollers in general. I like the idea you brought up, with the smaller children in those papoose/harness things, although I understand those could get uncomfortable. I do feel they're way safer than strollers in that environment, though.

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