Not signed in (Sign In)
This discussion has been inactive for longer than 5 days, and doesn't want to be resurrected.
    •  
      CommentAuthorARES
    • CommentTimeNov 28th 2007 edited
     (32.1)
    Recommended by Warren Ellis at Comic-Con this past year to a room full of drunks and otherwise incompetent people, which I very much was one myself. So finally, just the other day, I purchased a bottle of the 14 year at my local boozery. My current favourite scotch is Balvenie Doublewood but this is nearly as amazing, but in a completely different way. Tastes much better neat than with water, something I cannot say about the Doublewood. Thank you.

    I don't know if this discussion belongs in the Zoo. Maybe toward the front with the tamer things that can be seen from the street without coming too close, I'm not sure. This place is new, it looks like the Zoo will be what the Zoo will be, and this is most certainly an Is of some sort.
    • CommentAuthorhank
    • CommentTimeNov 28th 2007
     (32.2)
    A friend introduced me to The Dimple, which is a nice sipping blended scotch.

    I tried the Balvenie Port along with a few other single malts and decided I did not find them to be smooth enough to sip while writing.
    • CommentAuthorJEFFSJ
    • CommentTimeNov 28th 2007
     (32.3)
    I've got the same bottle at home (Oban). It's got a great bite. Also have the somewhat smoother Dalmore and the blindingly peatey Laphroaig. I think you could get away with sipping the Dalmore while writing, but the Laphroaig would probably work best as a pre-work hallucination generator. Or maybe an industrial solvent.
  1.  (32.4)
    Yeah, Laphroig's about my limit when it comes to the peatiness/antiseptic. I once had a young Bowmore Islay single malt that scoured the cell walls off my innards. Hideous muck.
    • CommentAuthorhank
    • CommentTimeNov 28th 2007
     (32.5)
    I had a Chinese friend buy some Sake that might as well have been rubbing alcohol. Even the most hardcore drinkers winced at that bottle for many months.
    •  
      CommentAuthormrkvm
    • CommentTimeNov 29th 2007
     (32.6)
    I enjoyed a dram of Oban thanks to a co-worker not too long ago. Quite nice indeed.

    I recently bought myself a bottle of Scapa 14yo. I've enjoyed a couple glasses so far. That's great stuff. Surprisingly light. The opposite of something like Laphroig.
    • CommentAuthorhank
    • CommentTimeNov 29th 2007
     (32.7)
    The GF likes Scapa. Its about $47US for a fifth here. So its not assbreakingly expensive
  2.  (32.8)
    I usually get given 2 or 3 bottles of Laphroig a year. So that keeps me going
    •  
      CommentAuthorCOMTE
    • CommentTimeNov 29th 2007
     (32.9)
    Ugh, the Bowmore is pure shite. If you're going Islay, the Bunnahabhain 12 YO is infinitely preferable. I hear mixed results re: the 18 YO, but the 25 YO is supposedly magical. And I can only imagine what the 1978 sherry casked Bunna tastes like.
  3.  (32.10)
    Bowmore Islay is drinkable if it's had at least 21 years in a pale oloroso sherry butt to draw out the poison. Otherwise, undrinkable filth.
    •  
      CommentAuthormrkvm
    • CommentTimeNov 29th 2007
     (32.11)
    I got a bottle of the Balvenie portwood as a gift several years ago, and I savored it for as long as possible. Yum.

    Funny, I had a friend recommend some of the Bowmore stuff recently. Glad I went with the Scapa.

    I was also recommended Clynelish and Ardbeg by a different friend. I gather the Ardbeg is like Laphroig on steroids, and it gives me The Fear. The Clynelish sounds nice though.
    •  
      CommentAuthorWil
    • CommentTimeNov 29th 2007
     (32.12)
    I have a bottle of cask-strength Macallan that I sip from every now and then to reward myself for making deadlines. It's like three different whiskys: drink it neat, and it's so spicy, and the finish so long, it could turn a normal person off scotch forever (good riddance, I say). Put in a touch of spring water, and it brings out even more flavors that I'm not pretentious enough to describe more clearly than "I likes it!" My favorite is to put it over some cracked ice. As the ice melts, it's like getting an entirely new drink every time I take a sip. If you can get a bottle, I highly recommend it.

    Some friends gave me a bottle of Oban for my birthday several years ago, and I killed it in a couple months, I liked it so much. I think I need to go buy myself a present once the deadline passes on Tuesday . . .
    •  
      CommentAuthorARES
    • CommentTimeNov 30th 2007
     (32.13)
    Weekend camping preparations for the night before 3 days in Death Valley:

    Sampled the bottle of Dalmore 12 year purchased for the trip, with a few drops of water I'm quite impressed with it! Much better than the price tag would suggest.

    Filled the flask with a small bit of Oban 14 year that I might share with others if I'm feeling up to it (read: whoever is sober enough to enjoy it properly).

    Just had an Stater Brothers eggnog (nothing but the finest) mixed with some generic Glenlivet 12 I had around, it was a lot better than I expected.

    Now I go watch South Park.
    •  
      CommentAuthorC.c.
    • CommentTimeNov 30th 2007
     (32.14)
    What an informative thread. My student's budget doesn't allow for most of this stuff, but good to note anyhow. Every once in awhile I'll spring for some Maker's Mark, but of course that's bourbon whisky, and ya'll are talkin' scotch.

    Anyone want to enlighten as to the nuances of some of these drinks? I'm only just legal (in the U.S. anyway).
    •  
      CommentAuthormrkvm
    • CommentTimeNov 30th 2007
     (32.15)
    Well, C.c., I'd start here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scotch_whisky

    First thing you need to know is that most only consider it whisky (blended or single malt) if it's made with no grain other than malted barley. Bourbon whiskey (note the 'e') is made with a blend of corn and other grain spirits.

    Here's an amusing blog all about whisky: http://drwhisky.blogspot.com/

    For myself, I'm like Wil. I know when I likes it, but I wouldn't be able to yammer off a bunch of tasting descriptions. Definitely a nice treat to savor on a cold night, though.

    I think the first single malts I ever tried were probably Lagavulin, Macallan, and Glenlivet. Probably all good starting places, though I don't know which ages to point you at. I'm sure someone here is way more qualified than me to recommend an affordable starter single malt to try.

    Finally, I always drink my whisky neat (nothing added). Some folks add water or even serve it over ice (gah!, says I).
    •  
      CommentAuthorC.c.
    • CommentTimeNov 30th 2007
     (32.16)
    Thanks, mrkvm. What threw me about the whiskey-whisky distinction is that Maker's Mark doesn't have the 'e,' despite being a bourbon whiskey -- I guess it's the only U.S. whiskey to do so (according to wiki)?

    Regarding water vs. neat - I hear that a splash of water can really open up the flavors. Any truth to that or does it depend on the kind?
    • CommentAuthorJEFFSJ
    • CommentTimeNov 30th 2007
     (32.17)
    Finally, I always drink my whisky neat (nothing added). Some folks add water or even serve it over ice (gah!, says I).


    Yeah. I tend to agree. There is a cold spring that I pass on my way to work every day. I stopped their during the fall to take some pictures and met a guy who drives down there regularly from Massachusetts (about an hour and a half drive) just to get water which he uses only for splashing into his single malts. He insisted that I am missing a lot by not adding a drop of fresh spring water to "open" the dram. I'm thinking of giving it a try.
    •  
      CommentAuthormrkvm
    • CommentTimeNov 30th 2007
     (32.18)
    So, a question for those that add water to their whisky. Just how much do you tend to add? The word "drop" makes me imagine myself with a medicine dropper carefully dosing my dram.
  4.  (32.19)
    C.c.

    I'm not a huge expert - although living in Glasgow does mean I get to try a good few single malts when I'm in the pub.

    The Aberlour 10 year old is what I'd recommend to a friend wanting to try a bottle of whisky. It's fairly easy drinking with not too much burn to it and a little sweeter than a lot of malts. I don't know if you'd find it easily in the US, but it's reasonably cheap over here and works well with a little spring water. A brief google suggests it probably goes for somewhere between fifty and sixty dollars in the US, but you'd probably get it cheaper with a little more searching than I have time for now.

    Personally I enjoy the Talisker 10 year old, and the 20 year old I had as a gift was beautiful, although they're both quite a sharp and spicy experience. I like the glow from the peatier whiskies. Both it and Warren's Oban seem to go for somewhere between fifty and sixty bucks too, which is odd because in the UK they go for about fifteen pounds more than the Aberlour. I enjoyed the Laphroaig but it was a little too strong for me to have in the house at the moment. Glendronach is another Speyside like the Aberlour, and has a similarly sweet and mellow taste to it. I can't remember what else I've tried recently.

    The thing is you're not buying a bottle of single malt to drink in a single evening, so it's a long term 'treat yourself' investment. I always drink malts neat, but you should try it neat, with varying amounts of water, and ice too, until you figure out what works best for you. There's a lot of snobbery around whisky, for example I've met people who will argue that if you're adding water you should try to match the type of spring water you use to the whisky you're drinking, a soft water for a Speyside malt, for example, but the thing is to enjoy the experience and figure out how and when you like to drink it. Good luck!
    •  
      CommentAuthorSarpedon
    • CommentTimeNov 30th 2007 edited
     (32.20)
    This is a really interesting thread. I'm on the same budget as C.c but I'm just finishing out a bottle of Jameson I've had for a while, which is an Irish Whiskey that's very popular here in Boston, second only to Jack Daniels as far as what I know of people drinking whisk(e)y. I'm not sure I get the spelling distinctions 100% I have to go read that wikipedia article) I'd like to get into Scotch and hopefully you can guys can yield some good suggestions. I'll have to see what's available locally (at the liquor store a few blocks from here.) and at what price. 40-60 dollars doesn't seem too unreasonable. Time to do some reconnaissance work.

This discussion has been inactive for longer than 5 days, and doesn't want to be resurrected.