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  1.  (322.41)
    He received a 6 million dollar salary and a percentage of the box office and merchandise which together came to 60 million. The entire budget of the 1989 film is estimated at 35 million dollars. Now 6 million is a good chunk of that, but 60 million upfront would have been very odd indeed, hah.


    Thanks for correcting me, it was misinformation. :)

    Yeah, now that I think about, 60 million upfront in 1989 would have been unbelievable.

    It's still a lot of fucking money, though.
    • CommentAuthorsacredchao
    • CommentTimeDec 27th 2007
     (322.42)
    I think he has about 5 good films in a very long career, Chinatown is indeed a classic but I do not credit Nicholson for that.


    Five Easy Pieces
    Chinatown
    The Postman Always Rings Twice
    The Shining
    The Departed
    The Last Detail...
  2.  (322.43)
    Let's not forget "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest".

    And I disagree about "The Shining". Not because of Jack, but because of Kubrick, whom I consider very overrated. The book could have been much better adapted.

    There's a scene on the book in which the protagonist is on the garden and the hedge animals on it start moving. Every time he blinks, they change position, literally in the blink of an eye. It's a spooky scene.

    Kubrick said he didn't put this scene in the movie due to technical difficulties (What? Cut, change the animal's position, restart camera). So instead of the hedge animals, he built a HUGE FUCKING MAZE, because apparently that was easier to do.
    •  
      CommentAuthorZ
    • CommentTimeDec 27th 2007
     (322.44)
    After seeing 'Sweeney Todd' (which is excellent if you actually have a *sense of fucking humour*), I can honestly say Sascha Baron Cohen would be a better Joker than Depp, and I can't even say I'd be excited about it. I'm looking forward to seeing Ledger in the role, he has the youthful energy to make mania work, if he brings it. I'd prefer to see Depp do Freeze (since *ahem* NO ONE has done it, my scarred-over brain says so). And while we're dreamcasting, Cohen ought to have a shot at The Riddler, he's articulate and witty enough to not make it sound ridiculous. Look at that shit NASCAR parody that came out not too long ago. All the slapstick and eye rolling in the world wouldn't deter him from playing a ridiculous piece-of-shit role 100% seriously and to hilarious effect. Probably the only character that made me laugh in that godforsaken piece of crap (blame younger siblings for tormenting me with it).

    As for Nicholson's 'comments' on the new movie, a quick search of GoogleNews doesn't show any recently reported opinions, so that may be someone's speculation as to what he 'thinks'- which seems stupid, because he seems to be taking the Bill Murray / Steve Martin route of growing up and looking for mature roles with some depth (or at least a universal appeal).

    If he were smart, he'd let sleeping dogs lie (as Clooney, Carrey, Jones, Ah-nold and others have). His performance was one of the best, he ought to take pride in that and cross his fingers for a resurrection of the brand. There's always the possibility he'll be recast in Batman: Arkham Assisted-Living.

    -Z
    • CommentAuthorsacredchao
    • CommentTimeDec 27th 2007
     (322.45)
    but because of Kubrick, whom I consider very overrated


    Blasphemy. Pistols at dawn, 20 paces.
  3.  (322.46)
    As for Nicholson's 'comments' on the new movie, a quick search of GoogleNews doesn't show any recently reported opinions


    http://www.worstpreviews.com/headline.php?id=6494&count=175
    •  
      CommentAuthorZ
    • CommentTimeDec 28th 2007
     (322.47)
    In fairness, looking into it, <a href="http://www.mtv.com/movies/news/articles/1573617/20071106/story.jhtml">the Nicholson interview </a> included the quotes, "Nobody ever asked me." "[..]It's like, in any area, you can't believe the reasons things do or don't happen. Not asking me how to do the sequel is that kind of thing. Maybe it's not a mistake. Maybe it was the right thing[..]"

    On the flipside, in a different interview <a href="http://www.comicbookresources.com/news/newsitem.cgi?id=12505">Michael Caine said</a>: "Jack played The Joker as sort of a benign nasty clown -- like a wicked uncle. Heath plays him like an absolutely maniacal murderous psychopath. You have never seen anything like it in your life. He is very, very scary. I turn up every month or so and do a couple of bits then go back to London. I had to do this bit where Batman and I watch a video which The Joker sends to threaten us. So I'd never seen him, and then he came on the television in the first rehearsal and I completely forgot my lines. I flipped, because it was so stunning, it was quite amazing. Wait until you see it, it's incredible."

    And there you have it. I'd make a 'two sides to every coin' joke, but that's a Two-Face sort of thing.

    -Z
  4.  (322.48)
    Not asking me how to do the sequel is that kind of thing


    I get the distinct impression he may not be aware its not a follow up on his Joker?
    •  
      CommentAuthorJay Kay
    • CommentTimeDec 28th 2007
     (322.49)
    I get the distinct impression he may not be aware its not a follow up on his Joker?


    That or he still obsesses over the role. I remember him saying that out of his entire film career, he considered The Joker his favorite. When they did interviews with him for the special edition DVD he had a Batman pendant on his neck. It's possible he just loves the role so much that he wants to be somewhat involved in it.
  5.  (322.50)
    I didn't know Nicholson cared so much for the role. Did he cut an extremely wonderful deal for himself based on the merchandising for Batman?
    •  
      CommentAuthorAlan Tyson
    • CommentTimeDec 28th 2007
     (322.51)
    I think it might be because he just had so much fun with it - which is something that Michael Keaton didn't seem to have playing The Bat.
  6.  (322.52)
    I think it might be because he just had so much fun with it - which is something that Michael Keaton didn't seem to have playing The Bat.


    Keaton did great, in my opinion. Bruce Wayne and Joker were two very different roles, you can't expect Keaton to have as much energy as Bruce Wayne as Jack did as the Joker.

    As for Jack's interview, I thought he overreacted, but I admire his sincerity. He didn't say nothing really bad, he even said he might watch it if he hears it's really good. I was just stunned at his angriness.
    •  
      CommentAuthorAlan Tyson
    • CommentTimeDec 28th 2007
     (322.53)
    Well, as odd as this will sound I think the best Bruce Wayne (not the best Batman, mind you) was George Clooney in B&R. He was fun, but you could believe he was the boss of big corporation. Keaton just didn't quite give me that feel. Not that he's a bad actor, just that he didn't quite do it for me.
  7.  (322.54)
    Well, as odd as this will sound I think the best Bruce Wayne (not the best Batman, mind you) was George Clooney in B&R. He was fun, but you could believe he was the boss of big corporation. Keaton just didn't quite give me that feel. Not that he's a bad actor, just that he didn't quite do it for me.


    Chris O'Donnell is a wooden plank. Alicia Silverstone and Uma Thurman had ridiculous characters (Thurman is wonderful, though). Schwarzzenegger had the worst lines in the whole film - which is saying a lot - lines like "ICE to see you!". Surrounded by that cast, it was easy for Clooney to stand out, let's admit.
    • CommentAuthorjohnmuth
    • CommentTimeDec 29th 2007
     (322.55)
    After Christian Bale, I think that Keaton was the best choice for Batman/Bruce Wayne. Keaton has the moodiness and dark demeanor that knowing Bruce is the mask and Batman is the real personality, just rang the most true. Bale has the same sort of darkness to him - which has been played to great effect in his other movies like American Psycho and The Prestige. Bale is also more believable as a rich, asshole...

    Heath Ledger personified the Joker in the shot from the trailer where he's hanging out of the side of a car - like a dog - while the car looks like it's just going completely out of control. Also, it'll be nice that the Joker won't be tied into Batman's past - like other superhero movies.
    •  
      CommentAuthorZ
    • CommentTimeDec 29th 2007
     (322.56)
    <a href="http://www.mtv.com/movies/news/articles/1576589/story.jhtml">
    Here's a new link to a trailer, and a breakdown</a> of the content. The link posted at the beginning of this thread is no good now (Warner Bros. pulled it from YouTube).

    Is anyone else applauding giddily over the recasting of Rachel Dawes? I just about wept with relief.

    -Z
  8.  (322.57)
    Is anyone else applauding giddily over the recasting of Rachel Dawes? I just about wept with relief.


    You bet I am.
    •  
      CommentAuthorZ
    • CommentTimeDec 29th 2007 edited
     (322.58)
    Cheers.

    With any luck, Gary Oldman will get more than four lines this time.
  9.  (322.59)
    Cheers.

    With any luck, Gary Oldman will get more than four lines this time.


    True. Oldman is too talented to be wasted on endless supporting roles.
    •  
      CommentAuthorZ
    • CommentTimeJan 22nd 2008 edited
     (322.60)
    Since there's already a thread making light of the man's situation (or rather, the mess the poor bastard's left), thought I'd post the following clip here:

    <blockquote>We’ve just learned that Heath Ledger was found dead today in his apartment in New York City, apparently having taken his own life.

    This really comes as an incredible shock and beyond the initial thought of him going so young (he was 28) there’s a haunted quality to Ledger as an individual that makes the loss all the more tragic.
    I interviewed Heath last fall in New York for I’m Not There and described at the time how chillingly he seemed to have turned himself over to his role as the Joker in the upcoming The Dark Knight.

    This is truly a sad day for film and even as I rewatch our interview, I’m bothered by the fact that he might be remembered by warning signs of a troubled soul than for the true talent he really was.
    Heath Ledger will absolutely be missed.

    The last interview IESB did with Ledger at the "I'm Not There" junket is posted below.

    At the time [of the interview], I had this observation, "If I had any doubt about Ledger as Joker, it vanished as soon as I saw him in person. His hair was grown out for the role and his eyes darted around the room, never quite making contact with mine. At his side was a clothespin that he handled the entire interview, pinching his fingers as he spoke. It wasn't hard to believe that at any moment he would leap to his feet and kill everybody in the room."

    <strong>Heath Ledger 1979 - 2008</strong></blockquote>

    If you're going to make fun of the man, or want to take a swipe at an Olsen twin, go to the other thread that'll be deleted any day now, please. For how this tragedy may effect this movie, or be used as a promotional tool by WB, see this thread.

    Cheers,
    -Z

    [EDIT <em>to add link</em>: <a href="http://www.iesb.net/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=4163&Itemid=99">There's an excellent, and intensely eerie interview with Ledger attached to that article.</a> Includes Ledger referencing 'The Killing Joke' and Arkham Asylum.]