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  1.  (3231.181)
    Geist: I get all of my comics from Minotaur Bookstore.

    They're excellent at pre-orders and you may even get lucky if you ask them to try and track down 1 and 2.

    I definitely recommend pre-order for the single issues, though, as there are a lot of comics lovers in melbourne, and the good stuff tends to go quickly, leaving a lot of folks waiting for trades
  2.  (3231.182)
    Well, the lords of Britpop have done it again.

    Brilliant art/story/piercings.
    I have since been getting this insane urge to tell people at work to 'Call me Mr Logos!'

    Additionally - 'Curse track' will be locked in my vocabulary for evermore

    Nice one, and well worth the wait.
    I'm looking forward to #3
  3.  (3231.183)
    We've got a new issue out this week. And there's a preview online, because we can't help but show off our finely honed body of work.

    Go Emily Aster!

    KG
    • CommentAuthorVermilious
    • CommentTimeJun 14th 2009
     (3231.184)
    Did I say delicious? A slip of the tongue. I clearly meant mind warpingly stupid and banal

    And who's this you've brought with you? Why, It's The Most Evil Woman in the World. Isn't that amazing!


    Good sirs, you have preemptively made my week. As phonogram does every time. Thank you.
  4.  (3231.185)
    PRETTY!
    • CommentAuthoralveright
    • CommentTimeJun 14th 2009
     (3231.186)
    I'll be heading down to my Local Comics Shop (a 22 mile journey) specifically to pick this up on thursday. Considering I will consequently have no money to buy things like "alcohol" and "food" for a few days afterwards does not dissuade me. This is a compliment.
    • CommentAuthorFlabyo
    • CommentTimeJun 14th 2009
     (3231.187)
    Well, that's next Saturday sorted then, to London!
    •  
      CommentAuthorbabymole
    • CommentTimeJun 14th 2009
     (3231.188)
    Oh, thats nice...

    I'm loving the colours.
  5.  (3231.189)
    huh, my comment disappeared? needless to say, i am very excited for this wednesday. so much great stuff!
    • CommentAuthorAnanzitusq
    • CommentTimeJun 14th 2009
     (3231.190)
    yessssss.

    more clues for the magic tatoo! go Indie Dave!
  6.  (3231.191)
    Vermilious: I'll admit. I have a lot of fun writing Emily and Seth.

    Stuart: Poor booze :(

    Thanks everyone. Hope you dig it.

    KG
    • CommentAuthorAnanzitusq
    • CommentTimeJun 16th 2009 edited
     (3231.192)
    Alright, mainly pumping this for tomorrow's release.

    First off, Comic Book Resources gave issue #3 a 5-star grade review:

    <a href="http://www.comicbookresources.com/?page=user_review&id=1112"></a>

    I'm looking to the Kid With Knife B-Side, but more so the Emily Aster A-Side.

    I'm terribly excited to meet the legendary ice queen, but I hope not too much of her mystery is revealed.
    Talk amongst yourselves.


    side note: how is PHONOGRAM selling? I know the early numbers for issue one were obviously fantastic with the second run, but how did issue two go? hopefully like gangbusters!
  7.  (3231.193)
    I'm pumped too.

    If anyone's interested in following the reviews, I collate them all here. Four really positive ones so far.

    Anazit: Selling okay. The sell-out wasn't actually that great, really. It sold out because orders were identical to the first issue of the first season, despite everything that's happened since. So the sell out was... well, we'd be surprised if it hadn't sold out. It was a case where we knew that demand was higher than orders, but there's little you can do. That we're basically making no money from the issues is what was slowed down the issues coming out, as Jamie had to go off and do a variety of WFH projects to get a roll of cash so he could afford to draw 'em for nowt.

    (And the issues coming out slower, I suspect, will impact on the sales. C'est la vie.)

    We're optimistic that we'll make some money when it hits the trade. PG: RUE BRITANNIA has just sold out of its first printing of 12K or so, so there's clearly an audience.

    KG
    •  
      CommentAuthorBisonkills
    • CommentTimeJun 17th 2009 edited
     (3231.194)
    Kieron, Jamie, I just wanted to add my own appreciation to the thread.

    I really loved the first two issues of The Singles Club. The overall concept and execution was enough to completely reel me in. Personally, I’ve always seen music as a very powerful force, especially when it’s used as a means through which to filter experiences.

    As a musician myself, I’m very interested in the intent of music and the perception of that intent by listeners. For example, Coil’s ‘Time Machines’ album never fails to takes me some pretty weird places (mentally speaking) whenever I listen to it, but I can never quite work out if that’s because I expect it to have that affect, or because of some secret musical alchemy Balance and co. worked into the recordings.

    You really should do something based around the early English industrial scene. It was such a vibrant and interesting time for music, especially in terms of looking at ‘music as magic’. Many of them dabbled in the occult, coupled in some cases with some heavy drugs use. But more importantly, they were trying to push boundaries. Coil, Current 93, Nurse with Wound, Throbbing Gristle… all fascinating musical entities in their own right.

    I’m planning on reviewing the first three issues of The Singles Club over at Exquisite Things, which is a blog I write with the assistance of a close friend of mine (who, incidentally, also writes for Rock-a-Rolla magazine). Yep, we’re both big music fans!

    We’ve been trying to sneak a bit of music content into the blog by running a ‘comic creator’s Top 5 albums’ feature, where we’re asking creators to give us their top 5 records of the moment, just whatever they’ve been listening to lately. So far we’ve had contributions from Warren Ellis, Carla Speed McNeil, Antony Johnston, Brendan McGinely and Brian Wood (whose Top 5 will be posted up later in the week). If you fancy contributing please drop me a line at bisonkills[at]gmail.com

    Matt.
    • CommentAuthorOddcult
    • CommentTimeJun 17th 2009
     (3231.195)
    You really should do something based around the early English industrial scene. It was such a vibrant and interesting time for music, especially in terms of looking at ‘music as magic’. Many of them dabbled in the occult, coupled in some cases with some heavy drugs use. But more importantly, they were trying to push boundaries. Coil, Current 93, Nurse with Wound, Throbbing Gristle… all fascinating musical entities in their own right.


    Yeah, but hardly anyone outside of people interested in the genre anyway have heard of that lot, and let's face it, most of the 'music' is pretty much unlistenable.

    They weren't so much into 'music as magic' as harnessing the energy that was built up in clubs and at gigs. 'Techno-shamanism' and 'Techno-paganism' is generally now taken to mean dodgy witchy-wannabees that simply use online message boards, but at their origins, they really meant 'techno' as in the genre of music and surfing the vibe that was created at raves, or using it to enter shamanic style trance states, for workings that went beyond pure entertainment. So many people have forgotten that, but then, I expect the memories of many of the people who were there are the time are full of all sorts of abscences now.

    I actually have a synopsis for a comic that's set in this area, and linking it up with the crop circle-making scene. I wrote it when I was a part of all that, but it never got completed, and now I think it might need a few years to mature, in much the same way as Phonogram needed some distance from Britpop.
    •  
      CommentAuthorBisonkills
    • CommentTimeJun 17th 2009 edited
     (3231.196)
    Yeah, but hardly anyone outside of people interested in the genre anyway have heard of that lot, and let's face it, most of the 'music' is pretty much unlistenable.

    They weren't so much into 'music as magic' as harnessing the energy that was built up in clubs and at gigs. 'Techno-shamanism' and 'Techno-paganism' is generally now taken to mean dodgy witchy-wannabees that simply use online message boards, but at their origins, they really meant 'techno' as in the genre of music and surfing the vibe that was created at raves, or using it to enter shamanic style trance states, for workings that went beyond pure entertainment. So many people have forgotten that, but then, I expect the memories of many of the people who were there are the time are full of all sorts of abscences now.

    I actually have a synopsis for a comic that's set in this area, and linking it up with the crop circle-making scene. I wrote it when I was a part of all that, but it never got completed, and now I think it might need a few years to mature, in much the same way as Phonogram needed some distance from Britpop.

    Hey Oddcult,

    Fair point that they are obscure fairly figures as far as popular music goes. I do agree that the early English industrial scene would be far too niche to base an entire comic on, but I do think it could serve as a nice reference point for an aside within the context of Phonogram.

    Personally, I don’t see how figures like Jhon Balance or Genesis P-Orridge are any more obscure than say, Diamanda Galas. It’s worth keeping in mind that Throbbing Gristle’s first official (and very bloody) set, caused outrage in Parliament and amongst the general populous of the UK. TG were dubbed “wreckers of civilization”, so there’s some level of notoriety there. Peter Christopherson of Coil worked as part Hipgnosis, so he’s cranked out a fair few classic album sleeves. I can’t help but feel a lot of what went on in the mid-late 80s percolated down into the collective consciousness on some level or another. I’ll readily admit that I’m a bit biased, I have a special interest in the period and the music… but surely that’s what Phonogram’s all about. Obsessing over music.

    In terms of how listenable the music is, well I guess that’s all a matter of personal taste. A great deal of how we perceive music is ‘learned listening’, drilled into us from an early age. Certain tonalities and frequencies will at first sound deeply alien, even uncomfortable, simply because we haven’t been exposed to them enough. That said, I find a lot of Coil’s output to be fairly melodic and then there’s always ‘Of ruine or some blazing starre’ by Current 93, which isn’t exactly heavy going either. By in large it’s pure pastoral folk, albeit with the occasional warped psychedelic touch here and there. Admittedly, this came later in the early 90s but it’s still part of their back catalogue.

    Ah, anyway… I am rambling here. I do like your idea for the comic by the way, it definitely sounds like it has promise.
  8.  (3231.197)
    side note: how is PHONOGRAM selling? I know the early numbers for issue one were obviously fantastic with the second run, but how did issue two go? hopefully like gangbusters!


    Yeah, no. It's selling out, but was so under-ordered that that was sort of inevitable anyway. It's a frustrating situation, because we thought the much larger sales of the first trade would lead into orders for the second series, but it didn't pan out. When it became clear that I would then be in a position of making no income for 6 months, I had to put the book on hold to make enough money to get through the rest of the series.

    Suffer for your art, and all that.

    Thanks to everyone picking it up.
    • CommentAuthorAnanzitusq
    • CommentTimeJun 17th 2009
     (3231.198)
    I need to win the lottery so i can bankroll your writing and drawing for the rest of time.
    Anything to make series three a reality.

    I'm going to wizard world philly this weekend and it breaks my heart that I'll be hunting for series one singles that give you no income.
    I sound like a sped-up teenie-popper, but nevertheless, this is fucking quality work and I look forward to it every month.
  9.  (3231.199)
    KID-WITH-KNIFE backup=the funniest thing i have read in weeks.
    • CommentAuthorVermilious
    • CommentTimeJun 18th 2009
     (3231.200)
    Seconded on the lottery thing.
    As per your comments in the back of this book, was the KwK backup intended to clear up the end of Rue Brittania? Because you mentioned something about people thinking there was no resolution. I mean, I got what was going on, so that just rendered it a delightful take on the book. Which was perfect.

    I know I said it earlier, but I'm very sure. Phonogram consistently makes my week. Musically too, apparently, as I went out and bought The Knife's Silent Shout this morning. Good stuff.

    Keep em coming. Any lottery proceedings go straight to you guys.