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  1.  (354.21)
    They are excellent books, I am however curious how things will hold up in the long run as we transition from War of the Roses to what, by necessity, must start to conform to a more traditional fantasy narrative in the aim of seeing a resolution.
    We have had both a steady increase in "magic" and a clear line of development of several characters into the people, and more exactly hero's journey archetypes, they will be for the narrative to come to its end.

    This is not a complaint just an observation, and one more then in part linked to the narratives of Jon Snow and Danerys as they are clearly on parallel journeys in very classic sense, and more so are almost certainly the central characters of the entire work when all is said and done.
  2.  (354.22)
    Great books, maybe the best in the genre, you must read them. I just hope Martin speeds up his writing. It's sad that Robert Jordan won't be able to finish his series but it would be a greater tragedy if it happened to Martin.
    • CommentAuthoreggzoomin
    • CommentTimeDec 20th 2007
     (354.23)
    Jordan was never gonna finish, though. He reckoned there was another TWENTY books to come - even if he hadn't been ill, he was pretty old to be writing some 20 000 pages or so - old age would have got him before it finished. I got pissed off with that series round about seven books in - things had slowed right down and seemed to be an endless litany of sniffing, braid tugging and sulking.
    • CommentAuthorKosmopolit
    • CommentTimeDec 20th 2007
     (354.24)
    "Highly recommended - the first book builds slowly, but just wait until people start getting injured and it takes off rather well."

    Yeah, midway through book 2 people start dying - including one of the main characters up to that point who dies an inglorious off-stage death which is described almost offhandedly.
    •  
      CommentAuthorJoe Paoli
    • CommentTimeDec 20th 2007 edited
     (354.25)
    eggzoomin
    Jordan was never gonna finish, though. He reckoned there was another TWENTY books to come - even if he hadn't been ill, he was pretty old to be writing some 20 000 pages or so - old age would have got him before it finished.

    Word is that he was determined to have the upcoming book 12 be the final book even if it was so long they had to invent a new bookbinding process to make it. There were reports on his blog that he worked on it as much as he was able before dying, and shortly before his death spent about two hours telling a room full of people how the plot unfolds. I'm pretty confident we'll get the final book posthumously.
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      CommentAuthorJoeViturbo
    • CommentTimeDec 20th 2007
     (354.26)
    Tor has Already selected Brandon Sanderson to finish the Last Book in the Wheel Of Time Series
    Announcement
  3.  (354.27)
    Anyone read any Brandon Sanderson books? Is he any good?
    • CommentAuthoreggzoomin
    • CommentTimeDec 20th 2007
     (354.28)
    Hmm, that sounds... well, I might try and borrow it, just so I can see how the infernal bloody thing turned out, anyway. My obsessive sense of completism will allow nothing less. Unfortunately.
    •  
      CommentAuthorJoe Paoli
    • CommentTimeDec 20th 2007
     (354.29)
    @JoeViturbo
    Tor has Already selected Brandon Sanderson to finish the Last Book in the Wheel Of Time Series Announcement
    Thanks for the info and links, Joe. I hadn't heard this.
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      CommentAuthorUnsub
    • CommentTimeDec 20th 2007
     (354.30)
    I'm having a time out until I can learn some manners.
    I love how this site has given me a great reading list. Keep em coming.

    Any fans of Bernard Cornwells historical fiction here?
    • CommentAuthoreggzoomin
    • CommentTimeDec 20th 2007
     (354.31)
    Yeah, I liked the Sharpe books. I've read his Starbuck books too, not as keen on those - equally well written and researched, just not as much gloriously swashbuckling fun.
    • CommentAuthorElohim
    • CommentTimeDec 21st 2007
     (354.32)
    I like Cornwell in general, although not so much his stand-alones like Stonehenge.
  4.  (354.33)
    So then I'll definitely be checking out these books. Thanks for the recs.
  5.  (354.34)
    What DEADWOOD did for the Western, SONG OF ICE AND FIRE does for Sword & Sorcery.
  6.  (354.35)
    Aptly said, especially with who holds the TV rights for the books.
    • CommentAuthortulpa
    • CommentTimeJan 3rd 2008
     (354.36)
    I'll have to actually wade through Song of Ice and Fire then, since apparently it contains all the same ingredients as Book of the New Sun except time travel, philosophy, wordplay, and the Dying Earth.
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      CommentAuthorUnsub
    • CommentTimeJan 4th 2008
     (354.37)
    I'm having a time out until I can learn some manners.
    Eggzomin I agree about Starbuck. I liked it but it seemed like his agent said "write a Sharpe novel for Americans". I would love for their to be a Sharpe novel that took place during the napoleonic wars but over here in the colonies. "Sharpe of the Mohicans" maybe? I loved the ones about the English longbowman and the Saxons and Vikings. It is a great way to learn about history and I have even considered doing some reanacting. I also considered doing some WW2 reanacting as a German officer but with my rather chunky build I would end up looking more like Herman Goring than Otto Skorzeny.

    The thing I don't like about most sword and sorcery books is the characters are usually way to 2 dimensional.
    That's one thing i liked about Cornwalls Viking series is the people acted like real people.

    I would actually like to read a really well written sword and sorcery book. Do you think Song of Fire and ice would be a good choice for someone who does not usually like the genre?
    • CommentAuthorWilf
    • CommentTimeJan 4th 2008
     (354.38)
    Anyone read any Robin Hobb? I'm working my way through her Assassin trilogy now, and loving it. Sounds like it might be on the same lines as George's stuff (not so heavily focused on the magic, no elves etc) - anyone read both? How do they compare?
    • CommentAuthorElohim
    • CommentTimeJan 4th 2008
     (354.39)
    Martin is leagues above Hobb, but she's still good. I thoroughly enjoyed the Farseer Trilogy (Assassin's apprentice etc.).

    J.V. Jones is a good stepping stone between Hobb and Martin.

    @ Unsub - There is a Cornwell book called Redcoat set during the American War of Independence. Also, Patrick Lassan in the Starbuck Chronicles is the son of Sharpe and his French girlfriend/wife.
    • CommentAuthorElohim
    • CommentTimeJan 4th 2008
     (354.40)
    As an afterthought, does anyone know when HBO are planning to start showing Song of Ice & Fire or Preacher?