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      CommentAuthorMark R
    • CommentTimeDec 22nd 2007
     (372.21)
    I follow certain writers pretty closely. If they're on a project, I will at least check out the first issue of what they're on. The art in a book is important, but not more important than a the story. The best art in the world can't save a bad story.

    I seem to be buying more non mainstream comics lately, don't know if I'm 'growing out of' the mainstream of capes and such, but I am reading more non-cape, smaller company published books.

    I'm not opposed to books where the characters get to swear.
  1.  (372.22)
    For me, it has to be a combiantion of a very talented artist (new or established) and a writer who knows what he's doing. This can be tough when dealing with an unexperienced comic writer, but 'Rama interviews at the very least give you an inlking as to the grasp they have for the characters and what they intend to do. I'll use some recent purchases to illustrate:

    * Checkmate, Vol. 1: Saiz has a great down-to-earth style, and I love the idea of blending poltical espionage mixed with superheroics.
    * Gotham Central, Vol. 2: Brubaker and Rucka are a great writing combo, creating a diverse cast rivaling most procedural TV shows, and the art is dark and nasty. In a good way.
    * Manhunter, Vol. 2: Some of the art is also done by Jesus Saiz, so there's that. And the writing is top-notch, creating a female superhero who comes off as more as a collection of the creator's sexual fantasties about the opposite sex.
    • CommentAuthorElohim
    • CommentTimeDec 23rd 2007
     (372.23)
    Firstly, Hellblazer, Preacher, Fables, Transmetropolitan and The Sandman were the first comics I ever read (I started late). My tastes branch out from them, i.e. source material & associated writers/artists.

    Secondly, I found I love Daredevil & Moon Knight, so the same applies to them.

    Plus word-of-mouth.
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      CommentAuthorcurb
    • CommentTimeDec 23rd 2007
     (372.24)
    Like most people here, I choose by writer, so for me it's Ellis, Moore and Morrison stuff mostly. I'll give anything by a 2000 AD affiliated writer a try, which in the case of Simon Spurrier's Gutsville turned out to be an excellent strategy, even if delays have somewhat scuppered that particular series' impact. I generally avoid Marvel and DC's superhero stuff, not out of disdain for the superhero genre so much as a dislike of the dense 'buy every issue of every possible spin off and single character series or find yourself out of the loop' marketing strategy. As for Marvel Zombies, is it just me or is that nothing but a blatantly transparent attempt to milk the zombie cash cow?
  2.  (372.25)
    As for Marvel Zombies, is it just me or is that nothing but a blatantly transparent attempt to milk the zombie cash cow?


    For comics, I think it is the zombie cash cow, as much as you can say there is such a thing.

    Past that we have Walking Dead and Black Gas, which while great choices for your money both if you like horror are probably not a cash cow.
    •  
      CommentAuthorUnsub
    • CommentTimeDec 23rd 2007
     (372.26)
    I'm having a time out until I can learn some manners.
    What is the best mainstream comic/guilty pleasure? I like Peter David's She Hulk and X Force.
    Whedons Xmen is good but not great. I have rather enjoyed the Punisher War Journal although it was Garth;s
    work on the Max version that inspired me to pick it up.

    What comic do you feel the need to explain or make excuses for if your friends see it? For me it was definitly Captain America and She Hulk.
  3.  (372.27)
    Favorite super hero work (I try not to use mainstream for super hero, because thats another notion that needs to die) is a tie between Capitan America under Brubaker and Checkmate. They are both excellent.
    • CommentAuthorharchangel
    • CommentTimeDec 23rd 2007
     (372.28)
    What leads me to what comics i pick up? as an artist it's alot to do with the art, but as a bookaholic and consumate consumer of words, well the writing is improtant as well.

    There are a few artists that i will pick up anything they put out. Chris Bachalo and Mike Mignola are the 2 most collected.

    WRiters i really enjoy and try to pick up is Gaiman, Mignola (again), Mike Carey, and of course Ellis' stuff, though i've only been exposed to hism ore mainstream work. I can't tell you how much i love NEXTWave.

    I'm also an X-men junkie.
  4.  (372.29)
    I prefer mature comics along the Vertigo lines. I read some superhero comics, but only when they're VERY good and/or written by someone talented, which is the case of Astonishing X-Men and Thunderbolts.

    My method is:

    1 - check the author's name: in case it's Garth Ennis, Warren Ellis, Alan Moore or Frank Miller, buy it immediately.

    2 - in case the authors are not the ones above, check on the internet how the readers received the comic. If the reception was good, buy it. If it's a superhero story, buy it only if the reception was very good.

    That's about it, really.
    •  
      CommentAuthorcurb
    • CommentTimeDec 24th 2007
     (372.30)
    Past that we have Walking Dead and Black Gas, which while great choices for your money both if you like horror are probably not a cash cow.


    Agreed. The Walking Dead seems to really capture the spirit of your 'classic' Romero style zombie fare, at least as far as I've read so far. Blackgas has some inventive splatter scenes and actually succeeded in making the zombification process even more horrific than previously imagined, both for the victim and their significant others.
  5.  (372.31)
    Blackgas has some inventive splatter scenes and actually succeeded in making the zombification process even more horrific than previously imagined, both for the victim and their significant others.


    Yeah, in Blackgas the humans became zombies but their consciousness remained intact, so they were aware of what they were doing but couldn't help it. Lovely.

    And let's not forget severed-head-with-cock-shoved-in-mouth.
    •  
      CommentAuthorcurb
    • CommentTimeDec 24th 2007
     (372.32)
    @Adrenavarro

    Well put, and the cock - in - corpsemouth scene sums it up. Doing that to someone you care about, but not being able to stop yourself ... brrr.
  6.  (372.33)
    Well put, and the cock - in - corpsemouth scene sums it up. Doing that to someone you care about, but not being able to stop yourself ... brrr.


    Yes. Well, fortunately the only zombie in the world is Keith Richards and he is unable of procreating due to the fact he cums heroin.

    Of course... your girlfriend could be a psychopath. Remember the girl who cut her boyfriend's dick off? I think it was because he didn't please her enough or something.

    Ah, human beings...
    •  
      CommentAuthorcurb
    • CommentTimeDec 24th 2007
     (372.34)
    Remember the girl who cut her boyfriend's dick off? I think it was because he didn't please her enough or something.


    Yeah, to this day I still worry someone's going to do a Lorena Bobbet on me. I now sleep in a titanium codpiece. However, it worked out ok for John Bobbet in the end, the penis was successfully reattached and he made a fair amount of cash doing talk shows and, bizzarely, porno films.
  7.  (372.35)
    Yeah, to this day I still worry someone's going to do a Lorena Bobbet on me. I now sleep in a titanium codpiece. However, it worked out ok for John Bobbet in the end, the penis was successfully reattached and he made a fair amount of cash doing talk shows and, bizzarely, porno films.

    ...

    ...

    ...

    Porno films?
    •  
      CommentAuthorcurb
    • CommentTimeDec 24th 2007
     (372.36)
    Porno films?

    I shit you not. I'm at home on my parent's PC at the mo, so I can't really go about trying to track down any citation without exposing their fevered elderly brains to more smut than they can handle, but I assure you he did. I think the idea was there was some kind of bizzare novelty that porn fiends would enjoy.
  8.  (372.37)
    I shit you not. I'm at home on my parent's PC at the mo, so I can't really go about trying to track down any citation without exposing their fevered elderly brains to more smut than they can handle, but I assure you he did. I think the idea was there was some kind of bizzare novelty that porn fiends would enjoy.


    Well, there ARE people who get horny by watching a girl piss or take a dump on the other, so I shouldn't be surprised...
  9.  (372.38)
    What is the best mainstream comic/guilty pleasure? I like Peter David's She Hulk and X Force.
    Whedons Xmen is good but not great. I have rather enjoyed the Punisher War Journal although it was Garth;s
    work on the Max version that inspired me to pick it up.

    What comic do you feel the need to explain or make excuses for if your friends see it? For me it was definitly Captain America and She Hulk.


    I love Punisher War Journal, Fraction does pure, bizarre, pulp invention oh-so-well. That goes for Iron Fist too.

    The mainstream comics I pick up are sometimes because they are just great on their own, but sometimes I just love watching editorial in action. Huge, title-spanning stories are great, when done right. It's almost a separate thing to enjoying great writing and art in a stand-alone series, but I do love the scale and nature of Marvel's current plans, even if about half of the individual series are pretty flat. Then, DC just couldn't pay me to get involved in the mess they're churning out.

    That's me done making my excuses :D
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      CommentAuthordswood
    • CommentTimeDec 24th 2007
     (372.39)
    I tend to go for writer/artist combos that excite me to see. As has already been mentioned, great writing can be knocked down by shite art, and likewise just plain bad writing can't be saved by even the prettiest of artwork. It's a medium that gels both, so I need both...

    That gets me to check a comic out. Whether it actually matches whatever I've built it up to in my mind is what decides whether or not I stick around.

    That said, word of mouth counts for a lot in my decision making as well. There will always be combinations of writers and artists on titles I hadn't heard of or just didn't quite catch my fancy at the time I did hear of it. If everybody's talking about it though, odds are I will be curious enough to at least catch an issue or two and see what all the fuss is about.
    •  
      CommentAuthorAlan Tyson
    • CommentTimeDec 24th 2007 edited
     (372.40)
    I've got a few friends I trust to recommend comics to me, and that's usually how I find new titles. Usually, though, when I'm shopping I pay attention to the writer and what the comic has to offer as far as innovation, either in art, genre, or composition. The first comic I fell in love with was The Red Star, which was arguably the first comic to correctly use digital art, and was a pretty ballsy story (a fantasy war epic based on the former Soviet Union), so that's been my template for good reading.

    As far as genre goes, I like stories that screw with the superhero concept, like Starman, Rising Stars, and Ultra. I'll also devour any kind of science fiction title. I prefer to by TPBs, nice long ones, that'll take me more than one sitting to read.