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    • CommentAuthorStefanJ
    • CommentTimeJan 3rd 2008
     (404.21)
    Huckabee did very well in the Iowa caucus. Giuliani? 4% Even Ron Paul beat him (10%).

    But New Hampshire is going to look very different.
    • CommentAuthorbiglig
    • CommentTimeJan 3rd 2008
     (404.22)
    Just watching Huckabee's speech to his supporters... they played him in with Sousa's "Liberty Bell".
    • CommentAuthorbiglig
    • CommentTimeJan 3rd 2008
     (404.23)
    Also: Chuck Norris is standing closer to him than his wife is.
    •  
      CommentAuthorScribe
    • CommentTimeJan 3rd 2008
     (404.24)
    Paul only beat the one man who wasn't officially running Iowa. I'm kind of curious to see how NH and SC play out.
    •  
      CommentAuthorobliterati
    • CommentTimeJan 3rd 2008
     (404.25)
    I'm having a time out until I can learn some manners.
    Obama!

    Kind of off the subject but I just wanted to yell that out loud.
    •  
      CommentAuthorZ
    • CommentTimeJan 3rd 2008
     (404.26)
    @obliterati

    I second that- fuck yeah!

    Obama!

    Woooooooooooooohooooo!

    -Z
  1.  (404.27)
    I have to say I was proud of,(and more than a little surprised by) the turnout last night here in Iowa. My little town of 900 had huge turnouts on both sides, and friends in other parts of the state reported the same.
    Huckabee's win was not a surprise, even though I initially predicted a Romney win. The Obama win did surprise me a bit, due to the support Edwards had enjoyed leading up to the caucus. I'm more than happy with Obama's win, since I just don't like Clinton.
    J
  2.  (404.28)
    I was surprised and displeased with Huckabee's win in Iowa, but I was even more surprised and very happy with Obama's win. It was unlikely but happened all the same, he's my favorite candidate. I have to say, though, Edwards' speech was the best in the night. Hillary limited herself to say cliches. And Obama followed the same style as Edwards, but not with the same energy. I prefer Obama, but I wouldn't feel bad if Edwards became the next president.

    As for Huckabee, a completely dull and uninteresting speech. Surprise, surprise. Anyone noticed Chuck Norris behind him?
    • CommentAuthorhank
    • CommentTimeJan 4th 2008
     (404.29)
    Is it me or does he resemble The Smiler a little too much?
  3.  (404.30)
    Is it me or does he resemble The Smiler a little too much?


    Not really. Edwards looks much more like The Smiler. Maybe because he talks like he just dislocated his jaw.
    • CommentAuthorElohim
    • CommentTimeJan 4th 2008
     (404.31)
    I did see a candidate on the news the other night who made me recoil in horror (because I thought it was the Smiler), but I can't remember which one it was.

    I have to admit, Ron Paul is my favourite Republican nominee... Not sure why, but he seems the best choice from my tired little shell. Suppose it's partly because he's never given up his doctor's practice in all his years in government.
  4.  (404.32)
    Huckabee blew his load in Iowa, and had to win just to keep his little parade of cluelessness going on for a little while longer. He has no chance of gettig the nom, and will flop in the next couple primaries, if he can get enough money to last that long.

    Giuliani finished so bad because he wasn't in Iowa. He's in Florida hoping he can win a big one. He has no money, and is trying to focus on a state with more delgates. I don't think he was in NH much, either, so don't expect mych from him there.

    Obama's win was lovely, as muc for his win as for Clinton's loss - it's a blast watching them scramble to explain that this is no big deal for her campaign.
  5.  (404.33)
    Huckabee blew his load in Iowa, and had to win just to keep his little parade of cluelessness going on for a little while longer. He has no chance of gettig the nom, and will flop in the next couple primaries, if he can get enough money to last that long.


    Very true. And its why I am neither worried and still stand by this thread's title. In fact I wonder if this might screw things up badly for the right, they have a false positive here. A massive focus of evangelical voters, which while important latter on, are reflected out of scope here.

    See, the evangelicals don't scare me anymore as a voting block. They are a strong one - but they are at capacity, and have begun to splinter a bit. There are no more hidden voters to mobilize for the right, while the left still has room to grow. So in certain states evangelicals are over represented and will impact where the delegates go, but its going to hit agaisnt states where they can't. It will be McCain in New Hampshire. Rudy in Florida and New York. This entire thing is gonna be messy indeed.

    On the other hand, I am interested to see where things go on Obama now.
    •  
      CommentAuthorAlan Tyson
    • CommentTimeJan 4th 2008 edited
     (404.34)
    Interesting things I noted at my Democrat caucus station last night:

    1) More 18-30some and 60-70some women voted for Obama, while more soccer moms voted for Hillary. I guess I'd expected more older women to gravitate toward Hillary for her stance on healthcare, but I was pleasantly surprised. More older men (<40) voted for Hillary, while younger men (>40) voted for Obama.

    2) When Biden was disqualified (too few voters for him) they split almost evenly down the middle between Obama and Edwards.

    3) Hillary supporters were more stoic, calm, organized, hardly speaking. Edwards supporters were cautiously optimistic, whispering and looking around the room. Obama supporters for confident, but kinda obnoxious especially when it became clear we had the 45% majority at our station. Towards the end we started tempting the Hillary people with donuts and stimulating intellectual conversation.

    4) The Obama supporters left the fastest after the poll closed, probably to get home and check the results. I stuck around a while, though, to observe the others. The former Biden-supporters huddled in a group, discussing I'm-not-sure-what. The Hillary people filtered out slowly, individually, quietly. The Edwards people sorta tried to chat up the former Biden guys, but it didn't really work. Biden trickled out, and Edwards was the last to leave, all at once. I'm not sure what that says, but it was interesting to note.

    Sadly, I didn't put any money on a Huckabee win. All well. Unfortunately, I think this is going to give Huckabee a good deal of false confidence, which means he can keep going. More merciful, for us and him, that he would have been knocked out early - now he's just going to skew the Republican side of things when it becomes clear that no one other than rural Christians like him.

    I'm really hoping McCain does well in New Hampshire, not because I actually see him becoming president (though I guess I'd be OK with it), but because if he gains enough support towards the end, and he gets into a big competition with Romney or, god forbid, Huckabee, those voters who were attracted to McCain might actually vote Democrat to keep votes from going to his rivals, come the actual election. That's a long shot, I know, but still, it's a shot.
    • CommentAuthorratjin
    • CommentTimeJan 4th 2008
     (404.35)
    I watched C-SPAN's coverage of a single caucus in Iowa last night. They had a few cameras wandering around the room listening in on precinct captains trying to lure undecideds and unviables over to their camp with empty promises and half-hearted compromises like "Okay, I know your issue is capital punishment, and it's mine too, but when I talked to Richardson, he sounded very thoughtful to my objections like he might actually consider changing his mind some day. So come on over here and we can work on things from the inside." Those harangued looked obviously pained and awkward -- as though they were just looking for a polite excuse to run far far away from these people that they know live somewhere near them. And you just know that those precinct captains are the same people as the street captains of the neighborhood association who go around writing down names of people they think are breaking ordinances and trying to get the city to install friggin' speedbumps on the street. Because we all like driving down bumpy roads. . .

    But hey, that's people bein' people. I can't expect their dialogue to be as polished as people who have a whole writing team behind them. . . I know mine isn't. Which is why I keep my mouth shut.

    Considering how freakin' scary Guiliani and Romney and McCain and Thompson all are, I'd still welcome a Huckabee nomination (though not election). I'd rather have a compassionate budget balancer who agrees that Bush's foreign policy is for shit than yet another warmonger who wants to throttle our civil liberties. Plus, you know there'll be jokes about Chuck Norris being the Secretary of Defense or the Director of Homeland Security.

    Back in 2000, I supported the idea of a Hillary run in 2008 or 2012, but that was before I got to experience her record in the Senate. She was far too much of an enabler to the Bush administration to keep my respect. If people aren't going to fight for change when they're in the Senate, why should I believe they'll do it when they become POTUS? Of course, that meant that Dodd got my immediate interest when he stood up last month for denying amnesty for the telecoms for spying on us. He's gone now, not that he ever had a real chance. . .

    I'm tentatively supporting Obama now. He can speak well sometimes, but he's not nearly as charismatic in brief statements as Huckabee can be (when Huckabee isn't talking about abortion rights and gay marriage). I fear that Huckabee is going to turn into a ruthless campaign machine, but I believe that America is dumb enough as a whole to vote someone even worse into office. That's why I'm not hoping for the worst possible Republican. . . we already did that twice in 2000 and 2004. Bastards.
    • CommentAuthorFlabyo
    • CommentTimeJan 4th 2008
     (404.36)
    Being British, and therefore fairly unused to the concept that you have any say in who gets to represent your chosen party, all of this sounds incredibly terrifying, and yet awesome at the same time. There was a story on the BBC news site that said one of the parties ran their vote by having people stand in the corner of the room corresponding to their favoured candidate. It all sounds a little Monty Python.

    I'm trying to imagine a situation where the local Guildford parties get the people together and ask them to choose their candidate. All I can picture is a room full of retired people drinking tea trying really hard not to offend each other.

    This being a constituency where we still vote in national elections in the local community centre using pencils that are tied to the voting booth by some string and sellotapte. Last time I voted there was a group of women's institute volunteers outside the polling station wearing various coloured rosettes offering cake if I'd be willing to take part in the exit poll.

    Democracy. It's just plain mental isn't it really?

    All I really know about the US election is that I don't want Hilary, or anyone on the other side that's like Lieberman, to win because they hate the video games industry. Shallow, but it's not like I get a say anyway...
  6.  (404.37)
    All I really know about the US election is that I don't want Hilary, or anyone on the other side that's like Lieberman, to win because they hate the video games industry. Shallow, but it's not like I get a say anyway...


    If you are worried about paper tiger use of video games as a threat to children they all do it but none of them are serious enough to use any clout to push for any laws from congress on it.
  7.  (404.38)
    I'm trying to imagine a situation where the local Guildford parties get the people together and ask them to choose their candidate. All I can picture is a room full of retired people drinking tea trying really hard not to offend each other.


    Which is why American politics is so exciting! We all punch each other in the head with vigorous zealotry 'cause our candidate is Right and True, until the candidate gets shut out in the caucuses, in which case we side with the Other Fella, 'cause we were on his side all along. Wanna have some real fun? Try to figure out the electoral college thingy....
    •  
      CommentAuthorAlan Tyson
    • CommentTimeJan 4th 2008
     (404.39)
    There was a story on the BBC news site that said one of the parties ran their vote by having people stand in the corner of the room corresponding to their favoured candidate. It all sounds a little Monty Python.


    That's precisely how it worked, at least for me. And now that I think about it, the process was a little Python-esque.
  8.  (404.40)
    Now you understand The Importance of Not Being Seen.

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