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      CommentAuthorjohnjones
    • CommentTimeDec 4th 2008
     (4381.1)
    Having read the series from it's outset, I'm becoming less sure that Mark's aim is to kill the other Freakangels, especially in revenge for for being driven out.

    The attacks that he's launched don't seem especially deadly, especially to people with the capabilities of the other 'angels. I think Mark is playing a different game entirely.

    Look at the nature of the attacks. In the first one we have Alice, shotgun in hand, walking the streets bellowing for a Freakangel. Not exactly subtle. If he was far enough into her head to "reprogram" her with secret commands, he was in their far enough to make those commands more lethal. He could've programmed Alice to act like a lone refugee until the time came for her to launch an attack on a more vulnerable 'angel. For that matter, she had two easy opportunities to kill Conner (holding the shotgun on him and later in his room with the hidden knife) and didn't press them at least not forcefully. Not a good job of programming, if an 'angel's death was what Mark sought.

    The attack on Jack was potentially lethal, but seemed to be initiated by the Mudlarks with no supervision by anyone else. The later attack on Whitechapel was almost laughably inept and easily repelled, even with Alice in the Watchtower instead of the usual Kirk.

    Speaking of Alice in the Watchtower, why not wait to launch a morter attack on the Freakcave while she's up there? Alice might eb able to scramble for the siren, but she certainly couldn't instantly warn the other 'angels as she has no telepathy (yes should can be part of a "mass call" but only if another 'angel specifically includes her, which they hadn't done to that point). All in all, as a "murderous" adversery of the 'angels Mark seems less than deadly.

    Which makes no sense. Unless killing the 'angels isn't his objective.

    What if, instead, he simply wants to be proven right in the argument that resulted in his banishment/near-execution? Recall that Mark's crime was "mass mind control." That speaks to a desire for rulership, not annihilation.

    Suppose Mark is "fucking with the afflicted" to push them into attacking Whitechapel. Eventually the pressure of those attacks would require the 'angels to step out of their preferred defensive posture, go out, and "kick some furniture over." Escalation follows escalation and soon enough Mark can reappear to serve up a big helping of "See, I told you so."

    And then Mark follows up by making the (by now reasonable) argument that the only way that the 'angels will be safe from the remnants of humanity is by taking active, collective contol of it. Which is now possible thanks to the Freakangel "dieback" of six years ago. Mark proposes an Empire with the Freakangels acting as rulers (or even Gods). A Pax Angelica in which the 'angels can fully protect themselves from humanity and perhaps even protect humanity from itself.

    Thus Mark wins his argument with his "family" and through that wins the world itself.
  1.  (4381.2)
    Hmm. Interesting theory. I personally don't believe Mark is out to kill all of the 'angels. I think he'll pick and choose. Because only two of the 'angels tried to kill him, the others don't even know about it. And he may use that against them... ge the 'angels to turn on themselves and sweep the remaining up into his "loving embrace" And possibly kill them. Maybe he wants to be the only one with the power. Maybe not. Maybe he is feeling the sharp loss of an 'angel love. KK, I would think- she's off having tons of sex maybe trying to forget Mark and his betrayal? Maybe Mark still harbors feelings for one of them, more than one, even, and he wishes to make them see his side. Or he could just be a power crazed bastard.

    Only time will tell.
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      CommentAuthorcheesecrow
    • CommentTimeDec 17th 2008
     (4381.3)
    @johnjones cool theory.... very logical...
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      CommentAuthormister hex
    • CommentTimeDec 17th 2008
     (4381.4)
    I love the organic nature of the story, as if it's all just unfolding and Warren and Paul are just transcribing it as it happens. Maybe I ingest too many pills I find on the floor at my CIA handler's office ...
  2.  (4381.5)
    I think it's a little too much.

    Just because Mark is trying to kill 'em or some of 'em, it doesn't mean that he's a perfect killing machine.

    Alice could have killed Conner. If she wasn't dangerous at all, KK wouldn't stop her.

    And the mudlarks could have killed the other 'angel.

    There's much we don't know, yet.

    The characters and the story aren't that predictable, and this is a very good thing.
    • CommentAuthorAnonymous.
    • CommentTimeDec 27th 2008
     (4381.6)
    I'd say it'd be foolish to make too many assumptions about the nature of the Freakangel powers, which I guess are being left ambiguous for a reason. I mean, we've just recently learned what Arkady can do - it seems despite the bond the sharing of knowledge isn't exactly rampant betweem them.
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      CommentAuthorAlan Tyson
    • CommentTimeDec 28th 2008
     (4381.7)
    He could've programmed Alice to act like a lone refugee until the time came for her to launch an attack on a more vulnerable 'angel.

    Who says he hasn't done something very much like this? Sent Alice in, intending her to get caught, and knowing the mercy he knew his sibs would show on the poor little mind-fucked girl, he was counting on them not killing her but going in and removing his mind-locks. But, what if he left something buried deep, I mean really deep. The 'angels think they've got Alice figured out, and as far as Alice is concerned she's back to normal again. But at a time of Mark's choosing, that really deep programming could kick in.

    Nothing's more dangerous than a trap you think has already sprung.