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  1.  (4588.1)
    I was reading this thread

    http://freakangels.com/whitechapel/comments.php?DiscussionID=845&page=1

    and it got me to thinking about trying my hand at mixing up some music...I haven't recorded anything since like 98 so I was wondering what programs people use to record and edit their music...preferably links to free programs as money is tight all over right now...many thanks...
    •  
      CommentAuthorroque
    • CommentTimeDec 28th 2008
     (4588.2)
    Goldwave, for editing. a very simple little tool and very very useful. one of the few free programs I've found worth getting a license for over the years.
    • CommentAuthorearl
    • CommentTimeDec 28th 2008
     (4588.3)
    Reaper is a cool program, not too expensive if you like it and decide to license it out.

    http://www.cockos.com/reaper/download.php
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      CommentAuthorjeremiah
    • CommentTimeDec 28th 2008
     (4588.4)
    goldwave is a good (free) wav editor. i like wavlab for editing if your gonna buy something....

    acid is good for multitracking and editing, you can pirate it easily.
  2.  (4588.5)
    I am using the free version of Cubase. It seems alright for basic multitracking and mixing.

    It may depend what type of music you want to make. Do you need good built in drum sounds etc?
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      CommentAuthorTheremina
    • CommentTimeDec 29th 2008
     (4588.6)
    I've been wrangling with the oh-so-enormous and oh-so-expensive Logic Pro software. I love it.

    But I too would suggest Acid if you're broke.
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      CommentAuthortaphead
    • CommentTimeDec 29th 2008
     (4588.7)
    Audacity is another nice free editor.

    Ableton Live is a glorious program for multitracking, mixing, looping, programming etc. The registered demo version is unlimited for two weeks, after which only saving and exporting are disabled and can be worked around pretty easily. And you can also get another two weeks of unlimited use by registering with another email address...

    (I'm assuming you're using Windows?)
    •  
      CommentAuthorTF
    • CommentTimeDec 29th 2008
     (4588.8)
  3.  (4588.9)
    I use Cubase SX, but recently i've been wanting to get something like pro tools or the old cool edit again to clean up audio files for mixes.

    if your conscience can handle 'borrowing' through torrents then i'd got with cubase, otherwise i've used goldwave before and it seems pretty simple to use but effective!
    • CommentAuthorradian
    • CommentTimeDec 29th 2008
     (4588.10)
    Reaper.
    It's free to try.
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      CommentAuthorbrittanica
    • CommentTimeDec 29th 2008
     (4588.11)
    using cubase, but i long for pro tools. seriously. it's what i was schooled on.
    actually have a copy here, but the computer can't handle it whatsoever.
    • CommentAuthorInexperto
    • CommentTimeJan 15th 2009
     (4588.12)
    Hello, helpful internet people!
    I've been toying around with recording in an extremely amateurish way for a while now - the sum total of my equipment is a USB mic and a rickety laptop running Audacity.

    I've been eyeing up the new Korg Nano range of digital music controller things. I was wondering if:
    a) anyone has had any experience with these things and could offer feedback, and
    b) they might just be accessible enough for a clumsy oaf like me with the most basic of recording skills and gear to be able to make beautiful not terrible music with

    (honestly, I'd really like a Tenori-On. But they've just jacked up the price in the UK and I'd have to put several major organs on eBay in order to afford one)
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      CommentAuthorrickiep00h
    • CommentTimeJan 15th 2009
     (4588.13)
    I've used Sonar, Garageband, Acid, Audacity, Soundforge, Digitial Performer, Live, and ProTools.

    Right now I am using ProTools 7.1, but my wife just got ProTools 8 from work, and we'll be installing that soon.

    The downside to ProTools is the whole "proprietary hardware" thing. I haven't used Logic before, but have been informed that it's extremely powerful, in addition to not having the proprietary issue that ProTools has. And, of course, each program has its own little nuances and things it does better than other programs. If you're remixing, any of the full-on workstation programs (Sonar, DP, Live, ProTools, Nuendo) should be fine, and you could probably get away with using Garageband or Acid. (Aside: Is Fruity Loops still out there?)

    If you're planning on creating your own music I highly suggest Propellerheads' Reason.

    Really, what it all comes down to is personal preference. I use ProTools because it's what I went to school with, and it's the industry standard, but plenty of professionals use Nuendo, Sonar, DP, and Logic. So... my advice is to try a bunch of stuff, I guess?
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      CommentAuthorizenmania
    • CommentTimeJan 15th 2009
     (4588.14)
    I started out on GarageBand, and found it sufficiently powerful for most of my home recording needs. It was great for getting things down as a demo, though it had some weaknesses on the mixing front. Up until it decided to stop opening.

    After that I jumped to Logic Studio, and I loved it. I know I've only scratched the surface of its capabailities, but I'm already turning out stuff that sounds leaps and bounds better than my GarageBand recordings. It is definitely an investment, though.
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      CommentAuthorLBA
    • CommentTimeJan 15th 2009
     (4588.15)
    Can you use logic on a PC? Are there any issues with it?
    •  
      CommentAuthorizenmania
    • CommentTimeJan 15th 2009
     (4588.16)
    Unfortunately these days Logic is Mac-only. I haven't had any problems with it yet, but I've admittedly only just begun to delve into the more complex functions.
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      CommentAuthorrickiep00h
    • CommentTimeJan 15th 2009
     (4588.17)
    I believe Digital Performer is Mac-only, as well.

    As far as "issues" with Logic, I hear the interface can be really intimidating. It does a LOT of stuff, and you can customize just about every window and panel to your liking. So if you want to spend a long time getting to know the system, it can be really, really powerful.

    So I've heard.
    •  
      CommentAuthorizenmania
    • CommentTimeJan 15th 2009
     (4588.18)
    Have you seen the size of the package? There is almost no wasted space in that box, because it's packed with something like 20 pounds of user manuals. That is how much crap there is that I have to learn about that program.

    For as customizable as it is, though, it's not too bad for a quick start, either. The default interface gets you everything you need to get started laying down tracks.
    •  
      CommentAuthorJehrot
    • CommentTimeJan 15th 2009
     (4588.19)
    You can use Logic 5.1 (and earlier) on a PC. It's powerful, complex and processor hungry, but I use it with few problems. In fact most of my issues arise from piling too many DSP's into the memory.
    On the plugin front, there are hundreds of top notch free DSP's around. I'll post some links when I've got a bit more time.
    It's not a patch on Logic 8 though..*sniff*.
    •  
      CommentAuthorAlastair
    • CommentTimeJan 15th 2009
     (4588.20)
    i use garageband, Fruityloops 6 (i think) and an old amstrad 5 channel tape desk.


    garageband records my mindless meanderings, fruityloops is for when i get obsessive with making electronic bloops and the amstrad we use for grindcore as it speeds everything up by about 10-20bpm, making voices sound silly but brutal downtuned speed sounds nice and grizzly and fast in it.

    oh i also use a Boss RC-20xl for live looping and noisemaking