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  1.  (4756.21)
    I think by the end it's just going to be one long panning shot of every chraracter weeping and cutting their wrists while "The Cure" plays in the background.


    I'm up for that.
    •  
      CommentAuthorPyD
    • CommentTimeJan 17th 2009
     (4756.22)
    seconded
    •  
      CommentAuthoroddbill
    • CommentTimeJan 17th 2009
     (4756.23)
    As far as I can recall, there's only ever been a single episode that had an all out, celebratory victory - that one way back in season 1 where Lee Adama destroys the Cylon mining operation on that asteroid they need to capture for fuel - remember that?

    Maybe that episode "Scar" could be considered a victory too.

    Part of what I love about this show is that the victories aren't clear or bombastic, and the misery is always present. I mean, if you think about the premise (12 planets full of people reduced to a few thousand individuals in one day of genocidal efficiency, and despite the fact that they flee in abject defeat, they are still pursued by their destroyers. They have to limp along aping civilization in essentially a collection of commercial airliners, cruise ships and one aircraft carrier) - it's more surprising that more of them haven't committed suicide by now.

    Winning a dogfight in spaceships sort of dims in significance against the rest of it.

    Though something is converging. Something sublime is on the horizon, I think.
  2.  (4756.24)
    Anyone here ever see "Threads"? It's analogous, and I think contemporary, to "The Day After" in the states.

    Watching this show is starting to feel like that. Only with higher production values and MORE CRYING.

    It's always been a very uneven show, moments of really great drama (Pretty much every second Admiral Cain was walking around, Baltar's descent from science-sex-hero to politician to messiah) with over-cooked nonsense (Fat Apallo and his speechifying, the Iraq occupation metaphor with all the subtlety of a Warner Bros cartoon) and now it's choosing the path of melodrama and CRYING as an ending. I'm curious to see if my own supposition
    (they're all Cylons and it's been a cycle of rebirth and death for hundreds of millenia)
    bears out. But man, I'm going to start drinking before I settle down to watch.
    • CommentAuthorchris g
    • CommentTimeJan 17th 2009
     (4756.25)
    why do i feel the need for alcohol and Russian roulette?
    • CommentAuthoricelandbob
    • CommentTimeJan 17th 2009
     (4756.26)
    @Orwellseyes

    I must be one of the only people here that hasn't seen Any of Battlestar Galactica (will prob get the entire set for my birthday), but i have seen threads and all i can say is that is the most brilliant, yet bleak,gruesome and depressing dramas i have ever had the misfortune to see. Not sure i want to see BG now....
    •  
      CommentAuthorCamyLuna
    • CommentTimeJan 17th 2009
     (4756.27)
    @ chris g - Russian roulette was my first thought when Adama went to see Tigh.

    @Oddcult -
    I didn't think of that angle with Ellen being an older version of Starbuck or a Six.It opens up a lot of possibilities
    •  
      CommentAuthorFinagle
    • CommentTimeJan 17th 2009
     (4756.28)
    I was kind of hoping that the tail section would read "Oceanic Flight 815."
    • CommentAuthorStefanJ
    • CommentTimeJan 17th 2009
     (4756.29)
    @johnjones: Yes, exactly.

    * * *
    So . . . could there something else going on that isn't awful? Something analogous to the "white ship" in the original series?

    It wouldn't be in character with the current series, but somebodies really powerful arranged for Starbuck's wild ride. That wasn't Cylon work, although Cylon technology (cloning/downloading) seems to have been involved.
    • CommentAuthorSteadyUP
    • CommentTimeJan 17th 2009
     (4756.30)
    @Stygmata - Ana Lucia was totally a Cylon.
    •  
      CommentAuthorjohnjones
    • CommentTimeJan 17th 2009
     (4756.31)
    Ana Lucia was totally a Cylon


    I don't know, she seemed a little too stiff and robotic to be a Cylon...
    • CommentAuthorOddcult
    • CommentTimeJan 18th 2009
     (4756.32)
    @camyluna -
    it's been set up for a long time. Right from the start, Ellen was set up as a Cylon. And now it's fairly obvious something is up with Starbuck. If the numbers are right, then Ellen has to be an older version of either her or six.
  3.  (4756.33)
    @Icelandbob:

    Threads is bone-rattling stuff. The last image, of the girl screaming at her dead and horribly disfigured child in the dark of a nuclear winter...good lord.

    But this is a space opera. Moody shots of actors staring into the middle distance on color-wiped landscapes just seems goofy.

    The mini-series and first season are fairly decent. James Callis is great fun as the completely terrified scientist whose sex life brings about the apocalypse and ends up being viewed as a hero while possibly further betraying everyone. Later on he cries. A lot.
    •  
      CommentAuthorhowyadoin
    • CommentTimeJan 18th 2009 edited
     (4756.34)
    But this is a space opera.
    I dunno, the sex, religion, politics and genocide on the show have never seemed space-operatic to me.
    •  
      CommentAuthoroddbill
    • CommentTimeJan 18th 2009
     (4756.35)
    I agree with howyadoin... I think the spaceships fool the viewer into expecting space opera... but this isn't space opera. It's something else.
    •  
      CommentAuthorFinagle
    • CommentTimeJan 18th 2009
     (4756.36)
    @oddbill -

    Yes and no. I think there's something always a little dark and suppressed in genre fiction. Westerns are just horse operas, but look at what Eastwood managed to bring to /Unforgiven/.

    I think the large problem is that the best cultural examples we have of sci-fi getting darker, /Star Wars/ and /Star Trek/, both did so with ham-handed unsubltety. I prefer my space opera with a little less "Khaaaaaaaaaaaannnn!" (peace be upon him) and a little more desaturation.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSt.Wanger
    • CommentTimeJan 18th 2009
     (4756.37)
    Well, many good Science Fiction Stories are always more about the point they want to make rather than about the Science Fiction itself.
    •  
      CommentAuthorGekko
    • CommentTimeJan 18th 2009 edited
     (4756.38)
    Definitely.
    The first BG was also a mirror of the era at the time. And said time pretended to be merry (Do we miss the crappy jokes? We still have the cigars)
    So is the new one: a reflection on our society right at the time it's produced. That's why we like SF, we have great stories that make us ponder about our lives today, under a different angle.
    • CommentAuthorSteadyUP
    • CommentTimeJan 18th 2009
     (4756.39)
    @Oddcult -
    "Over the course of the third season, Ellen came and went in my thinking in terms of who the final five were. It probably wasn’t until we settled on the final four that I knew it was Ellen. When we got to the final four -- Tigh, Anders, Tory and Tyrol -- then it felt like, “and Ellen has to be the fifth.” Because Tigh being revealed as a Cylon was such a profound shift in that character, such a big leap for the show, that it felt really natural that she was also a Cylon." - Ronald D. Moore

    Everyone interested in this thread simply has to read this.
  4.  (4756.40)
    This is a tangent, but somehow it almost fits...
    I keep thinking about Asimov's Foundation series and how at the end of the five or six books it turns out one of his original Robots was a secret force behind everything for millenia, essentially keeping an eye on Humanity and obeying the Three Laws.

    Now, on BSG, with cylons going back thousands of years.... hmmm.

    And the hybrids keep saying, "This has all happened before and will happen again..."