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    • CommentAuthorKosmopolit
    • CommentTimeJan 12th 2008 edited
     (488.1)
    Okay, it appears the supposed threats directed at US navy ships by Iranian Revoluntary guards may actually have come from a notorious local radio pest called "the filipino monkey".

    Filipino Monkey’ may be behind radio threats, ship drivers say

    By Andrew Scutro and David Brown
    Posted : Friday Jan 11, 2008 17:24:25 EST

    The threatening radio transmission heard at the end of a video showing harassing maneuvers by Iranian patrol boats in the Strait of Hormuz may have come from a locally famous heckler known among ship drivers as the “Filipino Monkey.”

    Since the Jan. 6 incident was announced to the public a day later, the U.S. Navy has said it’s unclear where the voice came from. In the videotape released by the Pentagon on Jan. 8, the screen goes black at the very end and the voice can be heard, distancing it from the scenes on the water.

    “We don’t know for sure where they came from,” said Cmdr. Lydia Robertson, spokeswoman for 5th Fleet in Bahrain. “It could have been a shore station.”

    While the threat — “I am coming to you. You will explode in a few minutes” — was picked up during the incident, further jacking up the tension, there’s no proof yet of its origin. And several Navy officials have said it’s difficult to figure out who’s talking.

    “Based on my experience operating in that part of the world, where there is a lot of maritime activity, trying to discern [who is speaking on the radio channel] is very hard to do,” Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Gary Roughead told Navy Times during a brief telephone interview today.

    Indeed, the voice in the audio sounds different from the one belonging to an Iranian officer shown speaking to the cruiser Port Royal over a radio from a small open boat in the video released by Iranian authorities. He is shown in a radio exchange at one point asking the U.S. warship to change from the common bridge-to-bridge channel 16 to another channel, perhaps to speak to the Navy without being interrupted.

    Further, there’s none of the background noise in the audio released by the U.S. that would have been picked up by a radio handset in an open boat.

    So with Navy officials unsure and the Iranians accusing the U.S. of fabrications, whose voice was it? In recent years, American ships operating in the Middle East have had to contend with a mysterious but profane voice known by the ethnically insulting handle of “Filipino Monkey,” likely more than one person, who listens in on ship-to-ship radio traffic and then jumps on the net shouting insults and jabbering vile epithets.

    Navy women — a helicopter pilot hailing a tanker, for example — who are overheard on the radio are said to suffer particularly degrading treatment.

    Several Navy ship drivers interviewed by Navy Times are raising the possibility that the Monkey, or an imitator, was indeed featured in that video.


    http://www.navytimes.com/news/2008/01/navy_hormuz_iran_radio_080111/
  1.  (488.2)
    Yes, very funny, let's send transmissions and raise tensions between two countries, because the world would oh so much benefit from it.

    It scares me what people are capable of doing when they don't have a life.

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