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      CommentAuthorSoulcraft
    • CommentTimeMar 18th 2009
     (5346.1)
  1.  (5346.2)
    I don't know why, but I really like listening to things like this. I have "Jupiter Music" on my iPod for sending me to sleep on long journeys.

    It's very nice.
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      CommentAuthorcelan
    • CommentTimeMar 18th 2009
     (5346.3)
    I remember reading somewhere that the earth's frequency was like a super low F#...but can't think where...
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      CommentAuthorrickiep00h
    • CommentTimeMar 19th 2009
     (5346.4)
    Okay, at the risk of sounding like a moron... what exactly would that microphone be picking up? Is that actually high-altitude wind, or what? Because space is sort of lacking a transduction medium.

    That whole "in space, no one can hear you scream" thing?
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      CommentAuthorDraug
    • CommentTimeMar 19th 2009
     (5346.5)
    Comment from the video poster:

    "OK, first of all I had no idea this video was going to be this popular. Pretty exciting stuff. Anyways, there's alot of arguing on here about sound in space. Obviously sound needs a medium to pass through, to vibrate through so that it can carry the sound waves. Space has no air, and therefore cannot project sound in audible wave form. As it says in the description, these sounds are not from satellites zooming around the earth with a normal microphone. Sohpisticated instruments can detect the different sonic vibrations going on in the planet GENERALLY. So what you are hearing is not what it would be like if you just stuck an ear out the window of a space ship. First of all you would probably either die or go deaf in that ear for the rest of your life because of the pressure of the vaccum. What the remote sensors on the sattellite are doing is analyzing different radio frequencies coming off the surface of the earth and converting it into audible soundwaves for you and I to hear. So you're not hearing whales, you're not hearing cars or even wind. You're merely hearing the general frequencies of the Earth in an audible format."
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      CommentAuthorPaul Sizer
    • CommentTimeMar 19th 2009
     (5346.6)
    This reminds me of Thomas Dolby on his last tour telling the crowd that he has been monitoring posted sunspot transmissions online (also translated transmissions from signals from the sun), and that he had determined that the "key" of our sun is A flat minor (if I recall), and that it was also the same key he played his song "Windpower" in. Very geektastic.
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      CommentAuthorinfomancer
    • CommentTimeMar 19th 2009
     (5346.7)
    @encephalo ray

    Where could one get their hands on these sorts of recordings? I've been trying to track stuff like this down, but to no avail.
  2.  (5346.8)
    You can get a thing called the Schumman frequency.

    Don't ask me why I know this...
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      CommentAuthorsomnonaut
    • CommentTimeMar 19th 2009
     (5346.9)
    So, is it an amalgamation of all the radio transmissions and satellite banter that's just pouring off of the planet, or the actual frequencies at which Earth resonates?
  3.  (5346.10)
    @infomancer -

    I've not managed to find standalone tracks on any torrents.

    The Jupiter music, Sun sounds, Earth frequency, they're all on Youtube. My reccomendation would be to download software that converts Youtube files into MP3 files. Free, easy, all that.

    If you're willing to risk the download (lot of people are irrationally fearful of this type of file) then i'll happily link/send/name one.
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      CommentAuthoragentarsenic
    • CommentTimeMar 19th 2009 edited
     (5346.11)
    @info and encephalo

    Use Audacity, it picks up any sound passing through your sound card (and works with most desktop sound cards/integrated sound, laptops are hit and miss). It's free and open source and everything. I use it all the time to rip songs from MySpace or Youtube. The only drawback is you actually have to listen to whatever you're trying to record all the way through.
  4.  (5346.12)
    @agentarsenic -

    I used to use Audacity, but like you said, it's hit and miss on a laptop.
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      CommentAuthorsomnonaut
    • CommentTimeMar 19th 2009
     (5346.13)
    You could also use AudioHijack which you can use to select what program you want to capture sound from. Unfortunately, unless you buy the full version, it adds static after 10 minutes of recording.
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      CommentAuthorinfomancer
    • CommentTimeMar 20th 2009
     (5346.14)
    Excellent, thanks everyone.
  5.  (5346.15)
    In that vein, there was an unusual "music of the spheres" vinyl record I obtained years ago. Based on an astronomer's observation of the orbits of our solar system's planets, it set each of the orbits to a particular musical instrument then mixed them all together. Even though the end result was a sort of aural cacophony, it was a pleasant one because you could pick up each of the planets' movements if you listened closely. The wild thing was that because this was a vinyl record, you could alter the turntable speed and get a different audio experience when you heard the recording.

    It's been years since I heard the recording, so I've forgotten the title and the who made it part.
    • CommentAuthorKosmopolit
    • CommentTimeMar 20th 2009
     (5346.16)
    Needs more cowbell.