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    • CommentAuthorOddcult
    • CommentTimeApr 10th 2008 edited
     (550.41)
    @DJ Dead Billy

    pfft. i guess it WASNT for poseurs when YOU were reading it


    It was actually on the reading list for a college course I was doing titled 'American Subcultures. The tutor who took the course dressed like John Voight in Midnight Cowboy. Yes...

    enjoy the (potentially) dubious honor of being heads above the rest of those trendy fauxcultists in the "magick scene


    Most people who stick at it get to this point sooner or later. I'm certainly not unique in being extremely frustrated with all the dross in something which should be fascinating.
    • CommentAuthorOddcult
    • CommentTimeApr 10th 2008
     (550.42)
    @Rudi

    Lucifer Rising, by Gavin Baddeley. It was a good read that traces the history of Satanism from the Dark Ages until present day.


    Yeah. A genuinely good book on the subject. I very briefly knew Baddeley a while back. There is absolutely no bullshit in his books and they're exceptionally well researched. He's got even less tolerance for the nonsense on the occult scene than I have.
  1.  (550.43)
    @warren

    Having not so much as seen a Bey book since the mid 90's, i couldn't tell you what his fans are like now. I can certainly tell you that when you've grown up practicing run of the mill western traditional magic and then find TAZ on the internet when you're 16, it tends to rattle some of your senses.

    his work doesn't really stand up once you've read the serious stuff and historical backdrop that his stuff was standing on the shoulders of


    oh of course it's heavily based on stolen ideas. i remember reading the part about spray painting odd phrases on the wall and thinking "cool, he knows about the situationists" (yeah yeah,i was 16) but of course,i'd say the exact same thing about the invisibles...or crowley.

    i had a girlfriend who once quoted Bey at me. We were talking about abortion and she quoted something along the lines of "seeing every bastard child come full term". I responded saying Hakim only spreads that idea so there'll be more kids to fuck. Our relationship didn't last long.
  2.  (550.44)
    then find TAZ on the internet when you're 16, it tends to rattle some of your senses.

    See, that's the perfect age to discover TAZ.
  3.  (550.45)
    @oddcult
    Most people who stick at it get to this point sooner or later. I'm certainly not unique in being extremely frustrated with all the dross in something which should be fascinating.


    i've only practiced for 16 years but and i understand your point. This still doesn't lead me to jump people's shit about the authors of the books they've read. i didn't see you complaining about Evola's fascist leanings. I've been continuously rolling my eyes at the chaos magicians of the last 10 years AND the "wise old magician" leftovers of the hippie generation. Here on the internet, everyone seems to knows better than everybody else. i stay away from any kind of occult "scene", this keeps me from being let down. i've met plenty of 30 something pagan men who's ultimate desire in life is to get girls "skyclad". i've also met quite a few older folks in OTOesque groups who's main point seems to be rallying people's money. i've practiced solo with the exception of maybe a handful of rituals and it has kept me satisfied. i don't go on occult forums or websites because i know i'll have to read through tons of crap before finding anything that's actually poignant. If you go into some occult forum,don't expect to come out of there liking what you've seen. That's like going to have your teeth drilled and then being angry that you're in a foul mood when you leave.

    The thing about "trendy fauxccultists" was a joke. Practicing magic isn't trendy. Do a bunch of 13 year olds inevitably get interested in it? Of course. With publishing companies like Disinfo putting retarded "teen witch" books in every borders/barnes and nobles across the country, stuff like this is bound to happen, but that sort of thing occurs in every subculture. Personally, i wouldn't spend too much time fixated on that. Otherwise, you'll end up a curmudgeon who's only source of joy comes from recanting about how things were in "the good old days".
  4.  (550.46)
    i suppose i'll list a few more that i've yet to see in this thread.


    the book of the sacred magic of abramelin the mage- samuel macgregor mathers
    the magus- francis barrett
    transcendental magic, its doctrine and ritual- eliphas levi
    3 books of occult philosophy- cornelius agrippa
    the training of the mind- alann bennett
    the book of pleasure- austin osman spare
    the zoetic grimoire of zos-austin osman spare
    thee grey book- TOPY
    nightside of eden- kenneth grant (really sp0OoOkY and oogily boogily,beware dear reader! XD)
    • CommentAuthorJigsy Q
    • CommentTimeApr 10th 2008
     (550.47)
    Tales from a Chinese Studio is a neat little compilation of old Chinese ghost stories & supernatural tales. If you're looking for something non-western.
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      CommentAuthorVespers
    • CommentTimeApr 18th 2008
     (550.48)
    I was reading through this topic, in fact writing down most of the recommendations so I can start looking around for some of them, and it reminded me that I actually own a copy of Cavendish's The Black Arts, which I bought several years ago when I was still young enough that I didn't really seriously read it, I just got it cos, y'know, omg its so coooool. Heh. But now I'm starting to look into this stuff more seriously, I dug through my shelves until I found it. As slybyron said up near the top, it's a really good overview, and reading it is giving me several ideas for directions to study for fully.

    On that note, does anyone know any decent books on numerology? I didn't see anything of that sort mentioned yet, although I could easily have missed it.
  5.  (550.49)
    @vespers? Numerology or Gematria?
    I can help with Gematria:
    Regardie touches on some of the finer points of Gematria in several of his books. Two books I have found indispensable are 777 by Crowley and Godwin's Cabalistic Encyclopedia.

    You can get a revised 777 (Now with the Arabic Parts!) here: http://www.rahoorkhuit.net/library/libers/Liber777_Revised.pdf
    I believe they host the original 777 as well.

    I wound up getting a copy of Godwin's Book from Amazon.
    •  
      CommentAuthorVespers
    • CommentTimeApr 18th 2008
     (550.50)
    @hank

    Numerology is what I'm looking at now. But thanks for the recommendations, I'll take those pdfs and put the Encyclopedia on the list with the other books from here in case I manage to wander onto the topic.