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  1.  (5623.1)
    Just curious, because it seems like there's a lot of different ways to read a comic on the screen.

    I'm trying to make it all work with the pdf format and plain low-res online presentation, but the more I dig into it, the more I see that there are all kinds of comic reader apps and comic files with unique extensions I've never heard of, plus now with webcomics there's scrolling and clicking to read things panel by panel, so I'm wondering, what do you think works best and why?

    And if I had a webcomic of my own and was looking to get it into as many computer screens as possible, what format would I have the most success at doing this with?
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      CommentAuthorLazarus99
    • CommentTimeApr 18th 2009
     (5623.2)
    I find CDisplay best. Easy to move between pages, reads all reader-type formats and best of all, you can have a floating magnifier.
  2.  (5623.3)
    The easiest way to run a webcomic by far, for the creator but especially for the reader - fewest barriers to entry - is to do it on a blog. You don't have to download any special software, and it has an rss feed so you can follow it using Google Reader or Bloglines or similar. I use Wordpress for my comic, The Cattle Raid of Cooley, along with a navigation bar I wrote with html at the top and bottom of each entry pointing the readers to the next and previous pages and so on.
  3.  (5623.4)
    I'll definitely try to explore both of those formats. We've got a blog for our comic here but it's mostly background extras and goodies. Maybe we'll try posting the chapters directly on it and see if that works.

    And how does CDisplay compare to CBR? I hear that CBR has similar functions.
    • CommentAuthorngebe
    • CommentTimeApr 18th 2009 edited
     (5623.5)
    i think you are a bit confused .cbr and .cbz are just extensions of rar and zip
    •  
      CommentAuthorFinagle
    • CommentTimeApr 18th 2009 edited
     (5623.6)
    CDisplay is the software; CBR is the file format - basically a bunch of zipped JPGs. However, it isn't that convenient for web distribution - as far as I know there's no browser plugin, it mainly runs on Windows, and although is free requires a software download as well as downloading the file.

    None of which is particularly onerous, but when you're facing a split-second decision by a consumer as to whether they want to read your comic or not I'd want to keep it as low as possible.
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      CommentAuthorLazarus99
    • CommentTimeApr 18th 2009
     (5623.7)
    Ja. Generally speaking, webcomics are either jpegs, tiffs or png files. Or, very occasionally, gifs.
  4.  (5623.8)
    Ah. Okay. Thanks for the clarification.

    Yeah, we've got everything in jpegs and are experimenting with pdfs right now, so I guess we're on the right track.
  5.  (5623.9)
    Pdfs allow higher quality of reproduction, but that might actually be a disadvantage. Anyone who downloads it can produce their own quality print edition, and can pass copies of the pdf to other people to do the same thing. My comic is offered free to view on the web as 72 dpi jpegs, which aren't print quality, so the only person with the ability to produce quality prints is me - which means I retain something I can sell.
  6.  (5623.10)
    Does anyone have any experience using Issuu? Basically, you upload PDF files and then it's converted into a magazine or book-like format that users can flip through. It only accepts PDF's, but those can be generated easily enough.

    The cool thing is that the Issuu viewer can be embedded within basically any type of web page. They have specific code that can be used for platforms like MySpace, Drupal, WordPress, LJ, and so on.
  7.  (5623.11)
    @Stygmata while CDisplay is stuck on windows there are .cbr readers for most operating systems, Comical for example runs on all of the big three, windows, mac and linux.
    I'd agree that for ongoing web distribution it isn't the ideal format but it could still have it's place, if you're intending to go on an archive binge for example it may well be preferable to spend ten minutes downloading a year of comics than having to load each page of a site.
    • CommentAuthorGreenBeard
    • CommentTimeMay 11th 2009
     (5623.12)
    I read all comics usually with CDIsplay. .cbr extensions. So far it's worked fine with me, but on a friends' computer it won't open any file with that extension. We got basically the same comp. configuration and same OS and still nothing. He hasn't got a virus, but something still won't allow him to open it.
  8.  (5623.13)
    I've been very happy with Simpleviewer, which automatically resizes the comics to fit the viewer's monitor up to whatever size you choose. I'm slowly streaming all the comics on my website into it so people don't have to read day-by-day/post-by-post as Comicpress is designed to release these things.

    But I wish Airtight, Simpleviewer's designer, would release PhotoSpace, his other app. It's gorgeous to leap through.
    • CommentAuthorCatFang
    • CommentTimeMay 13th 2009
     (5623.14)
    Has anyone played with the iphone apps for comics?

    They are intriguing in terms of new ways to expand the mdium but right now I think they only really work for comics that were written specifically for the format, even though you can zoom in to speech bubbles, panels etc on large traditional format pages.

    Am I just being a reactionary luddite?
    • CommentAuthorE0157H7
    • CommentTimeMay 13th 2009
     (5623.15)
    I just put the images into folders sorted by either story lines or dates that keep them in manageable groups and direct Microsoft Photo and Fax Viewer (or the analogue in whatever Linux distro I'm using) to them, skipping forward and back with the arrow keys. It works for me
  9.  (5623.16)
    I use CDisplay on my Samsung Q1 UMPC which is about the closest thing there is to a "Kindle for Comics" IMO. It's a bit of a wrist-breaker for one-handed use (at 1.7 lbs.), but the d-pad lends itself well to easy page-turning. The 7" display is about as small as I'd go to read an entire page in one view. You can probably get one for around the price of a Kindle now too.

    I've also been playing with the ACV reader on my Android/Google phone. It's a bit clunky so far, but does CBZs, ZIPs and their own ACV format. They also do content, like Cory Doctorow's Futuristic Tales of the Here and Now. http://www.robotcomics.net

    Watchmen is great to read with it's nine-panel format. Each panel fits perfectly on the screen. I haven't tried too many other titles on it yet, but I'd imagine other page layouts could be difficult to navigate on such a small screen.

    Any subscribers to Marvel's digital comics? I think they did a bang-up job on the interface.
    •  
      CommentAuthorAndySpield
    • CommentTimeJun 4th 2009
     (5623.17)
    @Gunderstorm
    Thanks for the news about ACV. I just got a Google phone and was wondering how to read comics on this device. Much appreciated!
  10.  (5623.18)
    Does anyone have any experience using Issuu? Basically, you upload PDF files and then it's converted into a magazine or book-like format that users can flip through. It only accepts PDF's, but those can be generated easily enough.

    The cool thing is that the Issuu viewer can be embedded within basically any type of web page. They have specific code that can be used for platforms like MySpace, Drupal, WordPress, LJ, and so on.


    So far, it seems awesome! I really like the way it lays out the comic to be read. You can check it out here
  11.  (5623.19)
    I'm doing my next webcomic with wordpress. But it's just going to be a weekly strip. And each strip will be sort of self-contained. I'm trying to make the things I put on the web much more self-contained and quicker to process.

    Has anyone used tumblr for their webcomic with any good effect?
  12.  (5623.20)
    Comicpress has added a flip page app that I intend to play around with once I get back at the helm of my own cpu.