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      CommentAuthorelwood
    • CommentTimeJan 22nd 2008
     (598.1)
    Not to use anyone here for free research at all, but I thought some here might find this a fun topic.

    I have been putting together some material regarding what changes in technology we can expect in the next 2-5 years and the effect it will have on crime. Its been a very fun topic, and there is a wealth of areas to go with this.

    Between cell phones, new places for fraud, items that used to be of low value going up, etc etc, there is a lot coming from my POV. I don't want to pre-bias anyone with some stuff I have found however - So my question is, what crime does everyone see coming up that is technology related in the next 2 to 5 years?
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      CommentAuthorm1k3y
    • CommentTimeJan 22nd 2008
     (598.2)
    RFID cloning - via the old-style pickpocket bump technique.
    used to gain unlawful access to cars/homes/offices
    • CommentAuthorKosmopolit
    • CommentTimeJan 22nd 2008
     (598.3)
    On a similar line - swapping RFID tags in stores with automated check-out to pass expensive items off as cheaper ones.
    •  
      CommentAuthorAlan Tyson
    • CommentTimeJan 22nd 2008
     (598.4)
    Increase in wireless access. Increase in cybercrime. Increase in variety of cybercrime.

    Also, someone is about to hack China.
    •  
      CommentAuthorm1k3y
    • CommentTimeJan 22nd 2008 edited
     (598.5)
    first homicide caused by bad customer service.

    flip of the old Going Postal.

    someone gets soooooo crazed by being treated like a turd that they open fire on the staff.

    (now - how is this technology related?
    'cause companies think they've put all their knowledge in their IT systems..
    ergo treat the human staff element with disdain. putting the minimum possible no. of staff, given the minimum amount of training
    - 'cause they're just a human-interface to their magical IT System.)
    •  
      CommentAuthorUnsub
    • CommentTimeJan 23rd 2008
     (598.6)
    I'm having a time out until I can learn some manners.
    Actually there have been plenty of murders because of bad customer service already.


    Using real time sat photos to evade law enforcement.

    As some countries tighten their borders and gun control you will start seeing guns made in underground workshops rather than smuggled commercial firearms.

    EMT's(electronic money transfers) being used for drug deals rather than cash.

    Patent infringement will be the new drugs.
    • CommentAuthorKosmopolit
    • CommentTimeJan 23rd 2008
     (598.7)
    First domestic robot (or surplus military robot) used in a homicide.
    •  
      CommentAuthorelwood
    • CommentTimeJan 23rd 2008
     (598.8)
    Here is one of my thoughts -

    Water theft will soon become a real way to make, or save, money. Poseidon Resources, who is investing over $300 million in ocean desalination technology, is expecting the price of water to rise 5.5% a year. These price increases will provide consumers with a greater incentive to create more creative and less detectable meter tampering systems. Further, this can lead to a black market of water distribution, or perhaps even theft from public water sources.
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      CommentAuthorVespers
    • CommentTimeJan 23rd 2008
     (598.9)
    perhaps even theft from public water sources.


    There are at least 3 lake/reservoirs within half an hour's drive of my house, and a purified reservoir within 20 mins walk. Maybe I should go take a look at the locks on that thing.
    •  
      CommentAuthorUnsub
    • CommentTimeJan 23rd 2008
     (598.10)
    I'm having a time out until I can learn some manners.
    Actually water theft has been a crime for hundreds of years.
    Rich landowners would illegally cut off the water supply for poor landowners near them and buy their farms for pennies when they failed.
    It was actually the plot in 3.10 to Yuma.

    Canada is quite concerned with the US already using bullying tactics to force us to give them our fresh water.

    Also the first robot killing a human has already happened. It is not Homicide because that means killed by a human. It was in Afghanistan when the US put a bomb on a UAV
    and killed an insurgent. It was not considered important by the media but I have a hunch we will look back on it as a milestone. There are already motion sensor equiped machine gun emplacements that can be set up to auto shoot.
    •  
      CommentAuthorelwood
    • CommentTimeJan 23rd 2008
     (598.11)
    There are at least 3 lake/reservoirs within half an hour's drive of my house, and a purified reservoir within 20 mins walk. Maybe I should go take a look at the locks on that thing.


    The point is, if the price of water goes up to a given level, you will have incentive to take a walk to those water sources, take a little bit of it, then turn around and sell it. Its not yours, but the theft may be easy, so the incentive is high.

    Back to the technology aspect of this, mods to your water meter have in the past not been seen by most as worth risking due to the low cost of water and the high penalty (even though you have a low chance of getting caught). If municipal water prices go up high enough, which if companies like Poseidon are right they will, a black market for easy modifications to these meters will quickly grow.

    And Unsub is correct, water crime has been around for a while. Including the black market for water.
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      CommentAuthorVespers
    • CommentTimeJan 23rd 2008
     (598.12)
    The point is, if the price of water goes up to a given level, you will have incentive to take a walk to those water sources, take a little bit of it, then turn around and sell it. Its not yours, but the theft may be easy, so the incentive is high.

    Hah. Yeah.. That was why I was wondering what the locks on that purified reservoir are like.

    As for modding water meters... Hmm, I had an argument against it but I've changed my mind, I was thinking too short-term. However, the meter for MY water and the meter for the neighbor up the driveway's water are right next to each other... I bet I could figure out how to mod them in such a way that *I'd* get the benefits but *he'd* get in trouble for modding the meters if they ever bothered to check... If I were ever to need to.

    Rains so damn much around here it's a lot simpler to just collect and purify my own, if it came to that level of difficulty, though.
  1.  (598.13)
    I think the new technology crimes are going to revolve around RFID. If identification becomes more and more reliant on RFID then opportunities for identiy theft and fraud are going to revolve around that.

    As for water, some of this already happens. It's not much spoken of but basically understood up here in Northern California that large-scale marijuana gardens have been stealing water from public and private sources such as stock ponds and rivers, using up staggering amounts of wate.

    There are also some stories of marijuana growers who have drained fire protection tanks for water, but those reports are unreliable.
    • CommentAuthorKosmopolit
    • CommentTimeJan 24th 2008 edited
     (598.14)
    During the drought in Australia there were quite a few farmers fined for stealing water from rivers.

    There was also one murder which arose from a neighbourhood dispute over water restrictions.
  2.  (598.15)
    >EMT's(electronic money transfers) being used for drug deals rather than cash.

    As someone who used to steal things for a living, I'd much rather deal with the hassle of cash than the electronic trail of EMTs.

    As surveillance becomes more and more pervasive, I'm waiting for the coming steganography boom. Yeah, it's being used now, but I'm waiting for every porn download and MySpace page to be loaded with missile codes.
    •  
      CommentAuthorVespers
    • CommentTimeJan 24th 2008
     (598.16)
    steganography

    *wikis*

    Huh. Ya learn something every day I guess, that's pretty awesome. The weak point of encryption systems like that that require the recipient to know how the sender encoded it is that somehow they still have to be informed of the coding technique at some point, yes? I mean, yeah, a single transfer is safer than many, but that one transfer absolutely cannot afford to be caught... right? Or am I missing something?
  3.  (598.17)
    >the recipient to know how the sender encoded it is that somehow they still have to be informed of the coding >technique at some point,
    How is that different from other deep coding systems? All recipients need to know how to unravel the knot of data and that includes having access to the code key.

    >but that one transfer absolutely cannot afford to be caught
    You can say that about pretty much any code. All coding systems are vulnerable if you smack them hard enough. The idea of encoding banal imagery is that it will make it less likely to attract attention in the stream of banal imagery that flows through network pipes.