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  1.  (6792.1)
    You've heard of records, right? I'll save you a googlepedia search if you haven't:

    Basic principle is that textures on the record make the needle twitch, and then you get different sounds.

    Got the concept?

    Now imagine playing a cross section of the lunar surface like it was a record. A really strange record...
    • CommentAuthorAlexGBYMR
    • CommentTimeSep 14th 2009
     (6792.2)
    That is great.
    It has the feeling of one of those things that you could spend hours just staring at/listening to.
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      CommentAuthorFractal
    • CommentTimeSep 14th 2009
     (6792.3)
    Oh my fuck. This is amazing.
    •  
      CommentAuthorPaul Sizer
    • CommentTimeSep 15th 2009
     (6792.4)
    I just listened to this for 2 HOURS! fucking A! With the ability to set the kinds of instruments for each range (I set Vibes for the high, Marimba for mid-range and Church organ for the lows) this was some of the best ambient jazz I've heard in ages! Genius!
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      CommentAuthorrickiep00h
    • CommentTimeSep 15th 2009
     (6792.5)
    Vibes for high, organ 1 for mids, strings for lows. Holy god is this thing weird.
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      CommentAuthortaphead
    • CommentTimeSep 15th 2009
     (6792.6)
    If only this thing spat out MIDI for my Ableton...
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      CommentAuthorFrekky
    • CommentTimeSep 15th 2009
     (6792.7)
    This is utterly fantastic.
    Can't wait to get home and record some of this stuff as ambient listening for later.
  2.  (6792.8)
    that is seriously rad
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      CommentAuthorRob Bass
    • CommentTimeSep 15th 2009
     (6792.9)
    What a leap. Conjures up images of the great-grandchildren of Gilmour and Waters charting out the perfect flight path for the conceptual sequel to LIVE AT POMPEII. Or wild-eyed mad 23rd century composers running amok with nitroglycerine, leveling mountains trying to build the perfect concerto before the fellow across the ocean beats them to it. All kinds of speculative fiction nestled up in that simple jump, planets as instruments, and that's before you even bring it all back home to Pythagorus. Thanks so much for the link.
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      CommentAuthorPaul Sizer
    • CommentTimeSep 15th 2009
     (6792.10)
    During his "Sole Inhabitant" tour, Thomas Dolby told the audience that he had determined through charting sun spot activity data (sent from satellites positioned halfway between the Earth and Sun) and running that data through midi controllers, that the "key" of our sun is A Flat minor. Which is the same key he played "Windpower" in. Which is incredibly geeky and cool, like this thing.