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    • CommentAuthorMek
    • CommentTimeOct 1st 2009
     (6922.1)
    It can't read your genome wholesale but the friggin thing is handheld
    NP Dr. is the world’s first hand held semi-conductor device that will be able to read your DNA in about 15-30 minutes. I was able to chat with DNA Electronics CEO Prof. Chris Toumazou who is also the founder of Toumaz Technologies, the company that brought you Sensium. Toumazou let me in on how SNP Dr. will change medicine and genetic testing, and what we can look forward to in the future of semi-conductors and biology.

    From what I understand it doesn't use crystalography, which would explain the size and speed? I'm at work now so I only skimmed it but thought I'd post this in case Warren Ellis gets a kick out of it. I must admit back when I read the G-Reader in Transmet I had the first prototype pegged for AD 2100+ so I feel pretty foolish right now. This, and the fact the US military is researching news ways to make us shit our pants from a distance leads to one conclusion:

    Mr. Ellis, stop making the future. Yours is scary. Awesome, yes, but scary.
    • CommentAuthorMek
    • CommentTimeOct 1st 2009
     (6922.2)
    Except the Shrieky Girls. Those are pretty awesome.
  1.  (6922.3)
    I'm telling you, people, Matt Taibbi is going to become Spider Jerusalem. That's the singularity that hurtles us into the world of the Beast.
  2.  (6922.4)
    So in a few years I can go into a doctor’s office, find out all of the incurable diseases I’m likely to get, and have my employer’s insurance premiums triple the following day?

    …Matt Taibbi is going to become Spider Jerusalem.

    Taibbi will never be anything more than another partisan harpy shrieking to the choir.
  3.  (6922.5)
    Partisan to whom? He's not exactly pro-Democrat.
    • CommentAuthorFan
    • CommentTimeOct 1st 2009
     (6922.6)
    > So in a few years I can go into a doctor’s office, find out all of the incurable diseases I’m likely to get, and have my employer’s insurance premiums triple the following day?

    I expect that people ought to be using that knowledge for "preventative" medicine.

    Many diseases are treatable (even if not curable), early detection means early treatment, early treatment means better outcome, and knowing that you have a higher risk means that it can be tested/detected with greater probability.

    For example I'm at risk for developing glaucoma, so I'm tested for it annually. The way it works is that if the disease causes damage then that damage is irreparable ("incurable"); but as soon as (but not before) the disease is detected than it can be treated, which arrests the damage (prevent any further damage): so early detection is what matters, and knowing what you're at risk for (i.e. what to test for) makes healthcare cheaper rather than more expensive.